Judge Reed

March 21, 2011

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Courthouse

January 26, 2011

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Farmer’s Trust 2010

December 22, 2010

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Courthouse. One morning in winter.

December 22, 2010

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Back of Irvine Row 2010

December 22, 2010

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First Lutheran 2010

December 22, 2010

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Frederick Watts

December 16, 2010

This property was the location of the law office of Frederick Watts in 1860. Previously it had been the residence of the Watts family, when the patrairch was David Watts, the father of Frederick Watts. The Watts family was of Welsh descent and carried a tradition of being lawyers. David Watts graduated from Dickinson College in 1787 and began a celebrated career as an attorney following his graduation. Frederick Watts continued this trend with his own graduation from Dickinson in 1819 at the age of 18. He then became one of the leading attorneys in Carlisle before his retirement in late 1860, at which time he was the president of Carlisle Gas and Water Company starting in 1854 and of the Cumberland County Railroad from 1841 through the early 1860s. During his career in Carlisle, Frederick Watts used his old family home as his law office, where he also took on freshly graduated law students to mentor. The building that served as the law office is known as the Blaine House and the building that remains from 1860 is merely one side of the old Blaine House. The house as it is seen today was built in 1794 by Ephram Blaine for his two sons to live in, which explains why there were two sides to the house. David Watts bought directly from the Blain family and used it as a private residence and potentially an office. When it was inherited by Frederick Watts, it’s primary use was that of a law office, which continued with the next owner, R.M. Henderson. Henderson is the person seen in the period image of the interior of the Blaine House. The photo can be estimated to be from the early 1870′s when Henderson was practicing law and was known to be the owner of the building. There are indications that the side of the Blaine house that was demolished before it could be restored was the residence of John Boas and his family in 1860. This could not be confirmed though and is being noted here as a possibility. Included in this residence would be John Boas, his wife, Rebecca, their four children, David, Albert, Elmira, and Edward, and a domestic servant, Catherine Pope.

Image courtesy of Cumberland County Historical Society


Image Courtesy of Cumberland County Historical Society


First Presbyterian Church

December 16, 2010

The First Presbyterian Church of Carlisle was not originally located at this location, but came to be here in 1757 when the first section of the present day church was built. The original location of the congregation of the First Presbyterian Church was at Meeting House Springs, where an old church graveyard can be found with graves dating to 1744. The building in 1860 had undergone some restructuring and additions from the original 1757 structure. These changes included the addition of a brick chapel to the western side of the church in 1827 and the relocation of the front doors from the south side of the building to the eastern side of the building on Hanover Street. In the interior, gas lights were added by 1857, but the interior of the church today originates from a remodeling project from 1873 to 1876 and as such differs from the 1860 interior. The interior of the church as it looked in 1860 can be seen in the period image of the interior of the church. President Washington worshiped here in 1794, while moving through Carlisle due to the Whiskey Rebellion.

Image courtesy of the “Carlisle Old and New”

Image courtesy of "Carlisle Old and New"


Dr. Stevenson

December 16, 2010

The next property lot was owned by A.B. Sharpe and Rd. Parker. The first building on this lot was one owned or rented by a Dr. T.C. Stevenson. This was not a residential building, but instead the office of Dr. Stevenson, a respected physician in Carlisle. Included with this post is an image of a surgical set that is marked as belonging to T.C. Stevenson. There are indications that Dr. Stevensons knew President Washington, and in invitation to dine with the President is also included.

Image courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society

Image courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society

Image Courtesy of “Carlisle Old and New”


Dr. C.J. Neff

December 16, 2010

This property lot was jointly owned by John Neff and Elizabeth Trout. The building on this lot was the home and office of a dentist, John Neff. He was advertised in The Carlisle American as selling catharic pills, which were described to fight off any diseases. In the 1860 Census, the inhabitants of this building included John Neff, his wife Margaret, their three children, and two employees of Margaret Neff. Margaret Neff is listed as a milline in the 1860 Census along with her daughter Annie and two other millines, Virginia James and Lizzie Warton. With the presence of two non-family member millines in the home, it could be assumed that Margaret Neff had a small milline shop within the home that she ran with the help and employment of her daughter and these two other women. Their son Theophilus, was a member of the Dickinson College class of 1863. However, he was a non-graduate of Dickinson.

Image courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society


The Irving Building

December 15, 2010

The Irvine building was erected in the 18th century as a two story stone building. It was served as a tavern known as the “Sign of Dickinson College.” When brick building came into vogue, a brick façade was added to the original stone structure. According to Richard Tritt, Diller Leidich ran a dry goods store inside in 1860.


Farmer’s Hotel

December 15, 2010

The property was sold in 1843 to Robert Cornman. The 1872 Atlas of Cumberland County shows that the hotel was then called the “Bentz House.” It was later called the “Florence House,” and by the turn of the century it was renamed as the “Wellington Hotel.” According to the 1860 Carlisle Business Directory, this hotel was called “Farmer’s Hotel” at the time. David Martin was the hotel keeper in 1860.


Cumberland County Prison

December 15, 2010

The old jail was built in 1854 at a cost of $52,000. It was designed by Edward Haviland and resembling a Norman Castle. In 1984, a new county prison was established in North Middleton Township and the old jail has since then been readapted for other county use.  Accroding to the Jail Walking Guide, there were several major modifications to the prison over the years. In 1890, a housing addition was added. A remodeling of the “cell block” was finished in 1960 and a kitchen expansion in 1970. Some interesting historical events concerning the prison includes the story of the infamous Lewis the Robber, an early 19th Century “Robin Hood,” legend has it robbed the rich and helped the poor. In addition, Carlisle resident Bessie Jones was imprisoned several times for tax evasion in the middle 1900s.


St. John’s Episcopal Church, Carlisle

December 15, 2010

The parish was founded under the Anglican Church in 1752.  The building standing in 1860 and existing today was started in 1826 and replaced an earlier stone structure.  Originally, the tower on the structure was located at its east end but beginning in 1860 and completed the following year, a full steeple was erected over its western entrance as it now stands. Extensive remodeling also took place at that time.  The vicar of the church at the start of 1860 was the Reverend Jacob B. Morss and Reverend Francis J. Clerc succeeded him later in the year and served as parish priest throughout the Civil War years.


				

December 13, 2010

Hey guys do you wanna meet tomorrow evening and Thursday morning to go over our presentation etc?


The Carlisle Market

December 11, 2010

This wooden market building was built in 1837 and was the second market house in this location. It would be replaced in 1878 with a larger, brick market house. The Pennsylvania Statesman reported on January 1, 1846 that the Carlisle market was “as good a market, for all luxuries of life as can be found in any inland town of the same size in Pennsylvania.”  The ordinance the Carlisle Town Council passed on June 3, 1852, labeled Wednesday’s and Saturday’s as market days for the borough, which began at seven in the morning from April through September and eight in the morning from October through March.  In January 1860, the Carlisle Herald reported the following  market prices:

  • superfine flour per bbl. $4.75
  • white wheat per bushel $1.28 to $1.83
  • rye per bushel $0.82
  • corn (new) per bushel $0.65
  • oats (new) $0.35.

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress


Images on the Blog

December 10, 2010

Good work on the images, if a little “last minute.” Remember that all these entries must have citations, unless you took them yourself and do not want anyone to know. This is a history methods blog, after all. And, when you can, title your blog entry.
But good work.

(Copy the “courtesy of” notation that I used on the 1896 Sanborn maps to credit the CCHS)


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010


December 10, 2010