2 thoughts on “Mrs. Dalloway: Clarissa and Her Role(s)

  1. Connecting Clarissa/Mrs. Dalloway to feminism: I think one thing that makes Mrs. Dalloway a feminist book is that there are several times in the book, where Clarrisaa sees herself as independent from her husband and calls herself Clarrissa. Even other times, when she calls herself Mrs. Dalloway , I believe she is criticizing it more than thinking of it positively.

  2. I know this really isn’t the place for this sort of thing (This post was for feminism, after all) but this was a part that struck me as worth mentioning.

    In the first chapter of Woolf’s “A Room Of One’s Own” the author dedicates a few pages to talking about her experiences with luncheons (pg. 10 – 18). Now, I won’t turn down a few pages on a discussion of food. However, what struck me as odd was how she used the luncheon to compare attitudes before and after the war and, seemingly, a loss of the romantic spirit.

    During the luncheon Woolf recollects the presence of a ‘humming’ before the war, a sound that lingered behind the discussions of dinner guests that “changed the value of [their] words themselves.” (pg. 12) To give reason to the in-definable sound Woolf flips through a conveniently (Too convenient, in my oppinion. I think Woolf is dipping into fiction a bit here.) placed book of poetry from Tennyson and Christina Rossetti, both pre-war poets who wrote romantic works. As the woman relishes the romantic poetry she ponders over a change of emotion that happened before and after the war. She claims that the old pre-war romantic poetry was so invigorating to her now because it “celebrates some feeling that one used to have” (pg. 14). Woolf is lamenting the loss of romanticism, a shattering of the capacity to create works that worship art and beauty in the wake of war.

    Now, for any other writer this look at war-changed states would be just a momentary blip. However, for the woman who penned the war-worn Septimus, this perceived loss of romanticism can help us delve a little bit further into her work on Mrs. Dalloway.

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