Entries from December 2017

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Mobility in the HR and CR

The Harlem Renaissance and the Celtic Revival are both movements that literally moved outside of their regions of origin.  By focusing on the movement within the movement, one can understand the influence that the Celtic Revival and Harlem Renaissance had on the societies.  W.B. Yeats and Claude McKay are two writers whose texts should be […]

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Internal Criticism and Variances within the Celtic Revival and Harlem Renaissance

The Celtic Revival and the Harlem Renaissance are both social and literary movements centered around marginalized groups of regional and ethnic groups.  While the Celtic Revival was, in an entirely broad sense, an attempt to reclaim and reestablish a national Irish identity and create a meaningful connection to the land itself, the Harlem Renaissance was […]

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Introduction

As an introduction to this anthology, I am presenting texts that investigate the power of silent protest during times of oppression and racial movements. It has come to my attention that aggression and violence have made its way into pop culture and media simulating that these are the proper responses to injustice. My belief on […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Introduction and Thesis

The literature of the Celtic Revival and the Harlem Renaissance both use prose and poetry to depict the desires of social and political change. Looking through the lens of sexuality between these two movements, attitudes towards sex and women are uncovered and represent the greater social beliefs towards gender equality at this time. Looking at […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Response to “An Evening with Solmaz Sharif”

“An Evening with Solmaz Sharif” was a wonderful opportunity because her writing is absolutely fascinating. Listening to a poet read their own work is always interesting because they emphasize different words than I would reading the same poem. I particularly enjoyed Sharif’s reading of the letters that she wrote because she changed her voice intonations […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Final Project Intro

The concept of alienation from society is found throughout both Celtic Revival and Harlem Renaissance literature. This rejection of the Irish by English society and rejection of African Americans by American Society fueled the need for these groups to create their own spaces in literature. These spaces became a place to move past their “othered” […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Creating Society at the End of Empire

The First World War and the time period around it had a transformative, profound effect on colonized peoples. The tensions between European empires led to the outbreak of World War I, which included the U.S. Literary responses to this moment from writers of artistic, political movements laid out the foundation for discourse on post-colonialism and […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Final Project Introduction and Thesis Draft

The Harlem Renaissance and the Celtic Revival movements explore race through literature and art. As students in the United States during the 21st century, we are often unaware of the racialized nature of the Celtic Revival texts, and we tend to over simplify the aspects of race in Harlem Renaissance literature. As Matthew Frye Jacobson’s […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

1923/1959: O’Casey and Hansberry’s Post-Event Plays

Somewhere around the midcentury, Lorraine Hansberry walked into a performance of Juno and the Paycock, Sean O’Casey’s working class drama, and heard in the language that pain, pain ever, for ever of poverty, of war, of human suffering. Herein she found the bottomless well from which she would derive the waters of her plays. The careers […]

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Anthology Introduction

When studying the Harlem Renaissance and Celtic Revival, sexuality is driving force in drawing parallels between these two movements. Throughout the Harlem Renaissance, authors like Langston Hughes combatted previous conventions of sexuality and depicted sexual attraction as capable of crossing racial lines. Additionally, authors like Claude Mckay introduced queer desire among African American individuals and […]