Entries Tagged as 'Uncategorized'

Friday, November 17th, 2017

Emily Bernard’s Views On Modernism

Emily Bernard’s Views on the intersection of modernism and the Harlem Renaissance are interesting when compared to the definition of modernism that we read about for class. In “Introduction: In Conversation: The Harlem Renaissance and the New Modernist Studies” by McKible and Churchill, differences and similarities between the Harlem Renaissance and the movement of modernism […]

Friday, November 17th, 2017

Modernism/modernity

  Hutchinson makes a good point that needs to be understood, that simply writing in this time period does not make one a modernist writer.  What I am understanding when reading this is that the writer must fill the genre that is being pushed forward and continue to make advancements to open up the world […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Emily Barnard Answers Modernism/moderninity

In her response Emily Barnard answers the question “how has your ideas about the Harlem  Renaissance evolved since you first began writing about it?” She says that her ideas haven’t changed but “evolved.” Emily says she was first drawn to the Harlem Renaissance because of the style of the era. As she learned more about […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Modernism Survey and Question

Kathleen Pfeiffer Survey Pfeiffer states that modernism and the Harlem renaissance are overlapping but not necessarily dependent on each other. She also states that their intersections are both outlived by the movements themselves. She states that there is a lasting value in the Harlem renaissance due to its always relevant political, and societal critique. This […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Modernism/modernity

In her answer to the first question, Kathleen Pfeiffer makes the connection and distinction between modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. She says that they work together, but they are not “interdependent.” Writers involved in both movements understood used the ideas from both movements together to strengthen their pieces, but writers only part of one movement […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Maureen Honey’s Response to McKible and Churchill’s Questionnaire

Maureen Honey addresses the question of  how she understands the relationship between modernism and the Harlem Renaissance in her response to McKible and Churchill’s questionnaire.  She begins by discussing the difficulties that minority groups had in entering into the literary canon before the Harlem Renaissance.  For example she mentions women writers and African-American writers.  These difficulties […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Modernism/Modernity: Houston A Baker

Summary of Questionnaire Responses: Houston A. Baker For Houston A. Baker, the notion that the Harlem Renaissance ceased to exist towards the end of the 1900s or failed to achieve its ambitions is a myth that must be remedied. Rooting the start of this falsehood in the 1960s when black nationalists and artists “castigated the […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Needs More Groucho, or, uh, is it the other one? Barbara Foley’s Dissatisfaction with Marxism in the “Harlem Renaissance” (as those Pesky Capitalist Fascists like to call it)

Barbara Foley succinctly draws out the problem with the title “Harlem Renaissance” for what she would call the New Negro movement with one word: “capital.” In her response, she uses capital to both refer to the centralization of the diasporic black societal revolution in Harlem as well as its its underlying Marxist meaning. In capitalizing […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Emily Bernard on Modernism/modernity

Emily Bernard focused her response around style, depth, and theater. While she first studied the Harlem Renaissance in undergrad, she mostly appreciated it for the surface level style. She appreciated and was attracted by the “elegance” of the clothing and buildings. However, the more she studied it, the more depth she saw in the movement. […]

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Honey’s Questionnaire Response

Maureen Honey’s response to McKible and Churchill’s questionnaire revolved around the lack of diversity in the cannon, specifically non-white individuals and females. She says that the cannon is “reflective of the inequalities in American life” as it is built upon the intellects of the “five or six white poets [who] shared deep political roots” (Honey, […]