Entries Tagged as 'Uncategorized'

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

On Yeats’ “The Man Who Dreamed of Faeryland.”

The longest of the three poems we’ll focus on during Friday’s class, this poem seems most invested in developing the detail/description of the narrative or story being told. The  title centers the dreaming man as the poem’s key focus, and the body of the poem furthers this effort by beginning every stanza with “he.” Specifically, […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 Notes About “To the Rose Upon The Rood of Time”

The title has a pretty alliteration that catches my eye. The “Rose and “Rood” flow well together, and the word rood tells me that the rose is fixed to the landscape of time.  The poem’s opening repetition of “red rose” already signifies the roses importance in the universe of the poem. The first stanza serves […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 things i noticed about the man who dreamed of faeryland

there’s an element of storytelling throughout, not only is the poem a story from his burial to the fish singing/waking him from rest to his disappointment in the end, but the “protagonist” is told stories by the different creatures/nature he encounters. the diction/colors in the poem are glimmering, glittering, silvers and golds, adding a sense […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 things I noticed about “Who Goes with Fergus?”

1.) 8 out of the 12 lines in the poem begin with “And” 2.) The rhyme scheme in both stanzas is ABCABC 3.) The verb brood is repeated in the second stanza after being used in the first 4.) The image and place of the “wood” is utilized twice 5.) The poem is addressed to […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 Things I Noticed in “The Lake Isle of Innisfree”

In the beginning, to have peace, the speaker must go to Innisfree. The last three lines negate this because the speaker claims to hear this peaceful place where he currently is. The overall poem exemplifies the Romantic idea of going into nature and living there, similar to Thoreau’s and Emerson’s ideas. While the speaker plans […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 observations, “The Man Who Dreamed of Faeryland”

By Olivia Watson Written in the third person; the “he” referring to the unnamed man of the poem’s title Each stanza consists of 12 lines Stanzas follow a consistent rhyme scheme (enclosing rhyme?) References to specific places in Ireland at the beginning of each stanza: “Drumahair”, “Lisadill”, “Scanavin”, “Lugnagall” Romantic language: “twilight”, “Druid”, “star-laden seas”, […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

Ten Observations about “The Man Who Dreamed of Faeryland”

The rhyme scheme is ABBACDDCEFFE, with four stanzas in total. Other than proper nouns and beginnings of each verse, the only capitalized words are Time, God, and Nature. The poem seems to be of a man who is either dead or dying, as it describes him as “musing upon” things and his “mind [runs]” before […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 Things I Noticed About “Who Goes with Fergus?”

Repetition of verbs. Within the first three lines, the narrator questions “Who will go drive“, “And pierce“, “And dance” with Fergus. All actions. There is a lack of explanation or background of who Fergus is. There is no description of his identity. In class, we discussed the name Fergus as a typical Celtic name used […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 Things Noticed about “The Cloak, The Boat, and the Shoes”

1. The last word in every stanza rhymes except for the word “Sorrow.” 2. In the second and third lines the speaker says, “I make the cloak of Sorrow: /O lovely to see in all men’s sight…” which I find interesting because sorrow is not usually associated with words like “lovely.” 3. The poem is […]

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

10 things about “The Man Who Dreamed of Faeryland”

At the beginning of the poem the subject appears to be dying/ dead The cause of death might be starvation, because when food was poured on the body- given to him- he was resurrected. In the first stanza, the speaker personifies Earth, and considers it a woman: “Before earth took him to her stony care” […]