Research Journals

Students will be required to post a total of THREE research journal entries at the course website (October 18, November 1, and November 8 (all dates revised), describing their experiences in seeking information and insights relevant to assigned biographical subjects from the Dickinson & Slavery initiative.  The first entry should narrate the process of finding basic genealogy from Ancestry.com (due 10/18).  The second entry should describe the process of researching assigned record collections at the Dickinson College Archives (due 11/1). The third entry should detail the results from collection searches at the Cumberland County Historical Society (CCHS) (due 11/8).  Each journal entry should occupy about 1,000 words (or 4-5 pages).  The narrative posts should include properly credited images and (where relevant) hyperlinks to outside sources.  Late entries will be penalized up to 5 points per day.

ASSIGNED SUBJECTS:

  • Lavine = Pinkney family (especially Noah, c. 1846-1923, and wife Carrie, c. 1850-1917, who sold food to Dickinsonians, but also note that Noah Pinkney also had two other wives, first wife Margaret with daughters Sarah and Ellen, and third wife, Nan Folks)
  • van Kuilenburg = Spradley family (including at least college janitor Henry, c. 1830 – 1897, and his son Shirley, 1874-1928, but also might try to include information Henry’s wife, Jemina or Mina, and their daughter Lizzie and her husband Alexander Bowman, who also worked as a Dickinson janitor).

HOW TO USE WORDPRESS

ANCESTRY ASSIGNMENT (DUE BY OCT. 18th –REVISED)

  • Receive assigned subjects (on 10/7) and try researching them in Ancestry.com (via the library database finder).  Create a narrative post that describes what types of documents you can discover about the subjects and their extended families.  Be careful to show relevant cropped images of those documents (with proper captions & credits).  Try to create a family tree that might lead toward the present day ancestors of these subjects.  Also, make sure to address the limitations or obstacles in such genealogy research and offer a conclusion that addresses some lessons learned from the experience.  You may use outside sources to help support your Ancestry research, but focus on the materials available inside that database.  Here are some student models from past journal projects:

COLLEGE ARCHIVES ASSIGNMENT (DUE Nov. 1st)

  • Visit College Archives on October 11th.  Start to seek out information on assigned subjects from the following collections:  drop files, Microcosm and Dickinsonian, Charles Himes photo collection, faculty minutes and treasurer’s expenditure accounts (for canceled checks).  Students may also consult other collections seeking additional information.  Then create a narrative post that describes some of the key documents and images that you were able to discover.  Make sure that you provide readers with a clear roadmap and citation guide to all relevant materials.  Here are some student models from past journal projects:

CCHS ASSIGNMENT (DUE BY NOV. 8TH)

  • Visit Cumberland County Historical Society (CCHS) on October 18th.  Then start to seek out information on the assigned subjects from newspaper collections, photo files, or from relevant contextual information on African African life in Carlisle during the 1880s and 1890s.  Create a narrative post that describes some of the key documents and images that you were able to discover.  Make sure that you provide readers with a clear roadmap and citation guide to all relevant materials.  Here are some student models from past journal projects:

BACKGROUND ON BLACK CARLISLE

  • 1896 article, “Negroes Under Northern Conditions” by Guy Carleton Lee (features analysis of black community in Carlisle) [Google Books]
  • 1910 Pennsylvania Negro Business Directory (hard copy, CCHS)
  • Sanborn Insurance Maps of Carlisle: 1885, 1890, 1896, 1902, 1909, 1915, 1923, 1929 (CCHS)
  • 1880 and 1900 US Census (note 1890 census records mostly destroyed) (Ancestry)
  • Bell, Janet. Lincoln Cemetery: “The Story Down Under” 1884-1905. Carlisle: Self-Published, 2011. (CCHS)
  • Cavenagh, Susan. “Blacks In Carlisle, 1870-1880,” History Department honors thesis, Dickinson College, 1970
  • Reis, Linda.  “Looking for Lochman” essay from 2000 collection on photographers (Carlisle photographers from this period include:  John Nicholas Choate, Charles Francis Himes, Albert Allen Line, Charles Lochman)

VIDEO TUTORIALS

CCHS “PASTPERFECT” TUTORIAL