Table of Contents

Chapter One: Introduction

Chapter Two: McKim and “the Impending Crisis”

  • This chapter will address McKim’s travels to Virginia with Mary Brown, his pre-Civil War involvement with abolitionists, his shift from being an absolute pacifist to supporting secession to rid the nation of slavery, and his resignation from the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.

Chapter Three: McKim and the “Experiment of Freedom”

  • This chapter will focus on McKim’s time in Port Royal, his involvement in the Port Royal experiment, his rallying for black enlistment and troops, and his support of Lincoln’s re-election.

Chapter Four: McKim and the Reconstruction Effort

  • This final main chapter will address McKim’s emphasis on freedmen relief societies, his first publication of the Nation, and his focus on the desegregation of Philadelphia street cars.

Chapter Five: Conclusion

 

Introduction

Brown, Ira V. “Miller McKim and Pennsylvania Abolition.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies no. 1 (1963): 56-72. [JSTOR]

Cohen, William. “James Miller McKim: Pennsylvania Abolitionist.” Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1968.

Cohen, William. “The Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.” Unpublished Master’s Dissertation, Columbia University, 1960.

Cowan, Alison Leigh. “A Very Special Delivery.” New York Times Upfront. Apr. 19, 2010. [Ebscohost]

Dusinberre, William. “Abolitionism and the Fugitive Slave Question.” The Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1965. [JSTOR]

Dusinberre, William. “Conclusion.” Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1965. [JSTOR]

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher and Carla L. Peterson. “Chapter 4: ‘We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident:’ The Rhetoric of Frederick Douglass’s Journalism.” Black Press. 2001. [Ebscohost]

Foner, Eric. Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of America’s Fugitive Slaves. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.

Jeffrey, Julie Roy. “Fugitives as Part of Abolitionist History.” Abolitionists Remember: Antislavery Autobiographies and the Unfinished Work of Emancipation. University of North Carolina Press, 2008. [JSTOR]

Kastor, Peter J. “‘Motives of Peculiar Urgency:’ Local Diplomacy in Louisiana, 1803-1821.” The William and Mary Quarterly 58. No. 4. Oct. 2001. 819-848. [JSTOR]

McPherson, James M. The Struggle for Equality: Abolitionists and the Negro in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1964.

Oakes, James. Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013.

Pierson, Parke. “Parcel Post to Freedom.” America’s Civil War. May 1, 2009. [Ebscohost]

Pollak, Gustav. “The ‘Nation’ and Its Contributors.” Nation 101. No. 2610. Jul. 8, 1915. 57-61. [Ebscohost]

Rose, Willie Lee. “‘Iconoclasm Has Had Its Day:’ Abolitionists and Freedmen in South Carolina.” The Antislavery Vanguard: New Essays on the Abolitionists, edited by Duberman Martin. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965. 178-206. [JSTOR]

Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.

Sinha, Manisha. “Editor’s Note: June 2018 Issue.” The Journal of the Civil War Era. May 22, 2018. [WEB]

 

Chapter 2: James Miller McKim and “the Impending Crisis”

Cohen, William. “James Miller McKim: Pennsylvania Abolitionist.” Unpublished PhD Dissertation. Ann Arbor: Unpublished PhD Dissertation, 1968.

Cohen, William. “McKim, James Miller (14 November 1810-13 June 2074).” American National Biography, June 2017. [ANB]

“The Funeral of John Brown at North Elba.” Chicago Press and Tribune. December 15, 1859. [ProQuest]

“The ‘Impending Crisis.'” The New York Herald. December 12, 1859. [ProQuest]

Laughlin-Schultz, Bonnie. The Tie That Bound Us: The Women of John Brown’s Family and the Legacy of Radical Abolitionism. Cornell University Press, 2013. [Google Books]

DeCaro Jr., Louis. John Brown Speaks: Letters and Statements from Charlestown. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015. [Google Books]

McPherson, James M. The Struggle for Equality: Abolitionists and the Negro in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1964.

Oakes, James. Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013.

Proudfoot, Devon. “From Border Ruffian to Abolitionist Martyr: William Lloyd Garrison’s Changing Ideologies on John Brown and Antislavery.” Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University, 2013. [PDF]

Reynolds, David S. John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights. New York City: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2009. [Google Books]

Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.

Williams, James. “The Road to Harper’s Ferry: The Garrisonian Rejection of Nonviolence.” Kent: Kent State University, 2016. [PDF]

 

Chapter 3: McKim and the “Experiment of Freedom”

Bacon, Margaret Hope. “Lucy McKim Garrison Pioneer in Folk Music.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 54, no. 1 (1987): 1-16. [JSTOR]

Cruz, John. “From Testimonies to Artifacts.” Culture on the Margins: The Black Spiritual and the Rise of American Cultural Interpretation. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999. [JSTOR]

Cruz, John. “Sound Barriers and Sound Management.” Culture on the Margins: The Black Spiritual and the Rise of American Cultural Interpretation. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999. [JSTOR]

Epstein, Dana J. “Garrison, Lucy McKim (1842-1877).” American National Biography. June 16, 2017. [American National Biography]

Howard, Victor B. “The Election of 1864.” Religion and the Radical Republican Movement, 1860-1870. University Press of Kentucky, 1990. [JSTOR]

“Pay of Colored Troops.” The Liberator, Feb 12, 1864. [The Liberator Files]

Pinsker, Matthew, and Sarah Goldberg. “The Prince of Emancipation.” Google Arts & Culture. [WEB]

Rose, Willie Lee. Rehearsal for Reconstruction: The Port Royal Experiment. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, 1964. [Google Books]

Roy, William G. “Music and Boundaries: Race and Folk.” Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010. [JSTOR]

 

Chapter 4: McKim and the Reconstruction Effort

Dusinberre, William. “Democrats, Negroes, and Conscripts.” Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1965. [JSTOR]

Dusinberre, William. “Dissenters, Slaves, and Volunteers.” Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1965. [JSTOR]

“National Freedmen’s Association Formed.”  The Liberator, Sept 1, 1865. [The Liberator Files]

 

Conclusion