Final Project and Projects to finish

So I have been continuing to research for my final project and clean it up as much as possible. Still struggling with Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. have only been able to track down one article form the whole month of July 1863 and it is some what informative but not as much as I would have liked. However, I think it will be helpful to add it to my paper none the less. Don’t know if anyone got a chance to look at the draft I posted last week and if anyone had any comments for me? If so please feel free to share them with me any constrictive criticism will help me. I have also been cleaning up my letter editing project as well and getting ready to submit tomorrow. Hope all you guys are getting through your work as well and not too crazy with the end of the semester approaching.

Project

So I have continued to research my project and make the corrections to my original draft. I had to research more in-depth Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. The Archives was only able to give me the editions from 1864 six months to a whole year after the battle took place. So i have added those two articles to my paper. I know that they are way out my 5 day timeline but they certainly will help describe use of the magazine. Here is my paper so far with some of the corrections done. I have highlighted my argument in the first paragraph. Let me know what you guys think and if it needs to be changed what I should change it to. I am struggling a bit coming up with a good argument wording wise.

The Battle of Gettysburg was one of the biggest and bloodiest battles in American history. As the battle escalated reporters kept appearing to report on the situation and conflict. The newspapers were people’s source of all this information. The newspaper people read was their lifeline to the world. The newspaper a person read was the key to how well informed they were and depending how far they lived away from Gettysburg depended on how long it would take them to receive information on the battle. If a person lived in New York City they read The New York Herald, if they lived in Rochester, NY they read The New York Herald as well, if they lived in Boston, MA they read the Boston Daily Advertiser, and if the lived in Lowell, MA they read the Lowell Daily Citizen and News.[1] 

            After the battle ended people all over the country were rushing and waiting with anxiety to see what the repot was from Gettysburg. Reporters crammed the telegraph lines with reports from the battlefield. With all this information to report the Associated Press was born. The Associated Press was created because of how many reporters were present in Gettysburg. With only maybe one or two telegraph available to the reporters they had combine messages to their editors. So when people were reading the paper they would see and article and at the end of it read “as seen in the United States Gazette and Philadelphia North American.”[2] The New York Herald was probably the most popular or at least one of the most popular papers of the day. While the battle ended on Friday July 3, 1863 the paper really did not start covering the news of the battle until Monday July 6. What the paper reported on July 6 was the retreat of Lee’s army[3] and the victory. Also reported in this edition were the casualty reports from the battlefield for people in the New York area but mostly more prominent members of the Union Army. Also in the news was the injury report on General Sickles[4] and how he was progressing as well as his unit. [Sickles article information here]. Also in this day’s paper was a report from General Meade[5]. He spoke of the great things that Union army accomplished and was even compared to the Duke of Wellington “Meade resisted the impetuous onsets of the Southern troops with all the obstinacy of Wellington at Waterloo, and with the same fearful losses to the enemy and himself”[6]. Most of the information that the readers saw in this would come from other newspapers or would appear in similar wording in other papers. One common newspaper that The New York Herald typically used information from was the United States Gazette and Philadelphia North American. As the days dragged on though the news of the battle began to dwindle. On Thursday July 9th the news that appeared was less than normal on the battle. The articles in The Herald took up some of the first page and covered the aftermath of the battle and movements of troops for both armies. All the reports of joy and celebrations are gone. People all over celebrated the victory and the Fourth of July with great pride and patriotism. Reporters who were covering the scenes in the streets said “In this city especially the day was observed with patriotic enthusiasm Crowds of people left the city upon steamboat excursions and picnics in the country; but crowds came to the city from all the towns and villages for miles around, and the streets were thronged as ever.”[7] Starting on Friday July 10th the reports really begin to dwindle and become less informative. The most informative piece that made headlines that day was a report of an engagement at Boonsboro.[8] By Saturday July 11th The New York Herald had moved on in their reports on Gettysburg and the citizens of New York City have moved away from interest in Gettysburg and any information that keeps coming from the battlefield.  

            The people in Rochester, New York were either readers of The New York Herald or the magazine Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.[9] The citizens of Rochester had to pay more attention to The New York Herald for the first few days because their local paper could not receive the information as fast as the bigger papers could. While researching Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper I was not able to find any information about the battle right after it’s conclusion.[10] What I found was in an edition written six months after its conclusion. On January 2, 1864 the magazine ran an edition that included a story from Gettysburg. The story was titled Reminiscence of Gettysburg: The Last Though of a Dying Father.[11] The other story that appeared in Frank Leslie’s was about Jack Dayton and titled Jack Dayton: An Episode of lee’s Raid in Pennsylvania.[12] The story explains the task of the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry and the death of Dayton after a firefight.

Granted while New York had a lot of divisions and individuals taking part in the battle Massachusetts was slightly different. Being so far from Pennsylvania, Massachusetts did not have many divisions take part in the battle. However, some were. The units that served in the First Corp Second Division were the 12th and 13th Massachusetts. The units that served in the Second Army Corp First and Second Division were the 28th, 15th, 19th, and 20th Massachusetts. Finally serving in the Third Corp Second Division were the 1st, 11th, and 16th Massachusetts. [13]The citizens of towns like Boston and Lowell[14] were certainly interested in the result from Gettysburg. Lowell would be most interested due to the fact that they since they had more cotton looms in one city then all the Confederate States combined and were responsible for weaving the cotton for the confederacy[15] they would certainly be interested in who won the battle. The biggest paper in Massachusetts at this time was the Boston Daily Advertiser.[16] The newspaper gave their citizens a lot of in-depth information about the battle that would have appeared in any other major newspaper. The information most important to any person who read this paper was what was the result of the battle and what, if any, division fought at the battle and how did they fair. Also they were certainly interested in the casualty list from the New England area. An example of an individual who died and who could have been prominent members of Boston were Lieutenant Summer Paine who served in the 20th Massachusetts and was a sophomore at Harvard University and son of Charles C. Paine.[17]               

            The citizens of Lowell did receive the Advertiser but that did not carry information that they would be interested in if someone from their area was involved in the fighting. Again we see a big city versus a smaller city/town. They wanted the news that the bigger papers delivered but also wanted the news that would captivate their attention. Papers back then had allegiance to political parties and certain individuals. If a private from Lowell was killed the Advertiser would probably not mention him in their list of casualties but the Lowell Daily Citizen and News[18] would because the people would want to know. Some of the articles that did appear in this paper were also articles that appeared in the Advertiser. The article appeared on the morning of July 10, 1863 for the citizens of Lowell was a short and just brief overview of what had taken place the last few days. It really gives their citizens no information on what really took place at Gettysburg and the effects had been. It does share with them the death total and the retreat of General Lee. It does also give the reason why Lee got away so easily “Lee retreated in better order and losing less artillery than has been represented. The reason is, that the Federal troops fought the Battle of Gettysburg entirely on the defensive and did not pursue the enemy beyond the contested ground.”[19]  So while this type of article was informative to the people of Lowell it was nowhere near the in depth analysis of the Advertiser. Granted a lot of the information in this article had been reported a few days ago in the other papers.

            People who received papers such as The New York Herald and Boston Daily Advertiser where people who would have a much better connection with the outside world because of the depth and quality of information given to them. Smaller towns that received papers such as the Lowell Daily Citizen and News were getting news but it wasn’t the same quality as the bigger papers. The news was just a watered down version of what appeared in the bigger papers. Also the news that would appear in smaller papers was most likely reported a day before or even earlier. These examples of papers really showed the difference between living in a big city and smaller town. Second the difference between being closer to the action and further away. Finally the difference between reading a big time paper and a smaller paper. You can a see a tremendous gap in reporting and information given by each newspaper. You can also see favoritism by each paper depending on the political party they were loyal to and what audience they were writing for.       


[1] The New York Herald was first published in 1835 and run by James Gordon Bennett Sr. By 1845 it was the most popular paper in the United States. It was a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party throughout the Civil War. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper was created in 1855 by English immigrant Frank Leslie in New York City, New York. Is regarded with a lot of historical value because of the illustrations that were added to it from battlefields during the Civil War. It survived until 1922. The Boston Daily Advertiser was founded in 1813 and run by Nathan Hale. It overtook the Boston Patriot and then The Boston Gazette. The Lowell Daily Citizen and News was founded in 1856 and ended its publication on 1876. The Publishers of this newspaper were Brown and Morey.     

[2] Talked about later in the paragraph.

[3] Lee’s Army was referred to as the Army of Northern Virginia. The army began a retreat on July 4th that took place on a rainy Saturday morning and continued long into the night.

[4] General Sickles was a commander of Union forces at Gettysburg who injured on the second day of battle. His unit was supposed to protect the area near the Round Tops but he advanced his unit forward into the Peach orchard where they were slaughtered by General Longstreet’s advance. He would be wounded and loose his right leg but awarded the Medal of Honor for his valiant services.

[5] General Meade was the commander who took of the Union Army after the firing of Hooker. He was altered of this promotion right before the battle took place and had to ride immediately to Gettysburg. He arrived the night of July 1st after the first day of fighting. He would go on to lead the Unions to victory and turn around the Union’s chances for winning the war.

[6] New York Herald, “General George Meade, the Commander of the Army of the Potomac” pg. 1 Col. 3 and 4 Monday July 6, 1863.

[7] New York Herald, “The Celebration of the Fourth of July- The Effect of the War News” pg. 1 Col. 4 Monday July 6, 1863.

[8] Boonsboro is located in Maryland and at the base of South Mountain in Washington County. It is located right in between Hagerstown and Frederick, Maryland. It was founded in 1792 by George and William Boone cousins of Daniel Boone and is a rural little town. As lee’s Army retreated from Gettysburg they based through Boonsboro but clashed with Union forces, which led to minor skirmishes.   

[9] Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper was a local paper in Rochester, New York. Look to footnote 1.

[10] Our archives did not have an edition available before the year 1864. They will continue to look for it and if found they will let me know. I will continue to look at our online collection and see what I come across.

[11] The story is about a father who dies from a mortal and is found clutching a picture of his three children. Since he was widowed and only knew that he was from New York Newspaper ran the story to try and find his children and tell them what had happened. It is one of the more touching stories from the battle.

[12] Jack Dayton was a member of the 16th Pennsylvania cavalry who had volunteered during the war in Mexico. He rejoined them again during the Civil War. As they are pursuing Lee’s army they clash with confederate forces under Fitzhugh Lee’s and Jenkins command. Dayton is injured during the battle and dies in the early morning hours the following day.

[13] These are just a few of the units from Massachusetts that actually were present at the Battle of Gettysburg. These were the most probable regiments who actually saw battle being in the higher corps. The other corps were mostly filled with reserves. As a side note the 1st Company of Massachusetts Sharpshooters were unattached to the 106th Pennsylvania. Information was found at www.michiganinthewar.org.

[14] Boston was the capital city of Massachusetts and is famous for sending divisions to aid the Union cause. Units such as the 54th Massachusetts are among these famous regiments. Lowell was one of the larger cities in Massachusetts at this time. It was the major producer of textile and manufacturing city in Massachusetts. Located just Northeast of Boston and located on the Merrimack River.

[15] Information found on www.lowellma.gov. November 15, 2010. Website designed 2010 City of Lowell, MA.

[16] Boston Daily Advertiser was located in Boston Massachusetts. Look to footnote 1.

[17] Boston Daily Advertiser, “Died” Friday July 10, 1863.

[18] Lowell Daily Citizen and News was the local newspaper for the city of Lowell. Look to footnote 1.

[19] Lowell Daily Citizen and News, “The Situation on the Potomac” Col. A, July 10, 1863.

Project

So I after completing the rough draft I had some more research to do. I still have to look up information on Frank Leslie’s newspaper and search for the General Sickles article. So far the Gen. Sickles article has proven to be somewhat hard to track down but I do know what newspaper it is. I also need to research information on the newspaper or magazine as it really is. Our archives does have some copies so I will look into them tomorrow and certainly after the break. Hope all your projects are going well.

Project

So far my paper is taking to take shape and look like its supposed to. At least in my opinion. I have gotten about three and a half solid pages of information. I still have information that I am researching and trying to figure out to add to my paper that will make it even better. Some the information is much harder to find because of the detail I do need to go in to. I think that the information I have been able to track down so far has been extremely helpful to add to my paper to give it some richness. Hope all of you guys are making progress on yours. I’ll post my paper on here so you guys can take a look at it and give me any criticisms or ideas that you guys have. 

The Battle of Gettysburg was one of the biggest and bloodiest battles in American history. It captivated peoples attention and when it was finally over on July 3, 1863 people wanted to hear the results and what occurred directly after it. The newspapers were people’s source of all this information. However depending on the newspaper people received and the distance people lived form the battlefield people may have been more out of touch with the information then they actually thought.  If a person lived in New York City they read The New York Herald, if they lived in Rochester, NY they read either The New York Herald or Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, if they lived in Boston, MA they read the Boston Daily Advertiser, and if the lived in Lowell, MA they read the Lowell Daily Citizen and News.[1] 

            After the battle ended people all over the country were rushing and waiting with anxiety to see what the repot was from Gettysburg. Reporters crammed the telegraph lines with reports from the battlefield. With all this information to report the Associated Press was born. The New York Herald was probably the most popular or at least one of the most popular papers of the day. While the battle ended on Friday July 3rd the paper really didn’t start covering the news of the battle until Monday July 6th. What the paper reported on July 6th was the retreat of Lee’s army[2] and the victory. Also reported in this edition were the casualty reports from the battlefield for people in the New York area but mostly more prominent members of the Union Army. Also in the news was the injury report on General Sickles[3] and how he was progressing as well as his unit. [Sickles article information here]. Also in this day’s paper was a report from General Meade[4]. [Insert information from his report]. Most of the information that you saw in this would come from other newspapers or would appear in similar wording on other papers. One common newspaper that The New York Herald typically used information from was the United States Gazette and Philadelphia North American. As the days dragged on though the news of the battle began to dwindle. On Thursday July 9th the news that appeared was less than normal on the battle. The articles took up some of the first page and covered the aftermath of the battle and movements of troops for both armies. All the reports of joy and celebrations are gone. [Examples of reports]. Starting on Friday July 10th the reports really begin to dwindle and become less informative. The most informative piece that made headlines that day was a report of an engagement at Boonsboro.[5] By Saturday July 11th The New York Herald had moved on in their reports on Gettysburg and the citizens of New York City have moved away from interest in Gettysburg and any information that keeps coming from the battlefield.  

            The people in Rochester, New York were either readers of The New York Herald or their own local newspaper Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.[6] The citizens of Rochester had to pay more attention to The New York Herald for the first few days because their local paper could not receive the information as fast as the bigger papers could. By Saturday July 11th Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper ran its first and only pieces of news on The Battle of Gettysburg eight day’s after its conclusion. The paper talked about the invasion by the Confederates and what took place at Gettysburg. They gave their citizens updates on the military activities by the Union forces in the Southern States. Other than that the paper too much of it’s information from the Herald and just recited for it’s readers. [Examples]. This newspaper was informative however for it’s readers. Since New York was such a big state the Herald could not cover everyone’s death from smaller cities such as Rochester. Leslie’s would have to do this, especially the people from their own town. [List some of the dead and other articles referring to this].

            Granted while New York had a lot of divisions and individuals taking part in the battle Massachusetts was slightly different. Being so far from PA Massachusetts did not have many divisions take part in the battle. However, some were present at the battle. The units that served in the First Corp Second Division were the 12th and 13th Massachusetts. The units that served in the Second Army Corp First and Second Division were the 28th, 15th, 19th, and 20th Massachusetts. Finally serving in the Third Corp Second Division were the 1st, 11th, and 16th Massachusetts. [7]The citizens of towns like Boston and Lowell[8] were certainly interested in the result from Gettysburg. Lowell would be most interested due to the fact that they since they had more cotton looms in one city then all the Confederate States combined and were responsible for weaving the cotton for the confederacy[9] they would certainly be interested in who won the battle. The biggest paper in Massachusetts at this time was the Boston Daily Advertiser.[10] The newspaper gave their citizens a lot of in-depth information about the battle that would have appeared in any other major newspaper. The information most important to any person who read this paper was what was the result of the battle and what, if any, division fought at the battle and how did they fair. Also they were certainly interested in the casualty list from the New England area. [Examples and actual names].

            The citizens of Lowell did receive the Advertiser but that did not carry information that they would be interested in if someone from their area was involved in the fighting. Again we see a big city versus a smaller city/town. They wanted the news that the bigger papers delivered but also wanted the news that would captivate their attention. Papers back then had alegions to political parties and certain individuals. If a private from Lowell was killed the Advertiser would probably not mention him in their list of casualties but the Lowell Daily Citizen and News[11] would because the people would want to know. Some of the articles that did appear in this paper were also articles that appeared in the Advertiser.   


[1] All these newspapers have been viewed on the 19th Century Newspapers link on the Library’s website. The New York Herald was first published in 1835 and run by James Gordon Bennett Sr. By 1845 it was the most popular paper in the United States. It was a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party throughout the Civil War. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper was created in 1855 by English immigrant Frank Leslie in Rochester, New York. Is regarded with a lot of historical value because of the illustrations that were added to it from battlefields during the Civil War. It survived until 1922. The Boston Daily Advertiser was founded in 1813 and run by Nathan Hale. It overtook the Boston Patriot and then The Boston Gazette. The Lowell Daily Citizen and News was founded in 1856 and ended its publication on 1876. The Publishers of this newspaper were Brown and Morey.     

[2] Lee’s Army was referred to as the Army of the Potomac. The army began a retreat on July 4th that took place on a rainy Saturday morning and continued long into the night.

[3] General Sickles was a commander of Union forces at Gettysburg who injured on the second day of battle. His unit was supposed to protect the area near the Round Tops but he advanced his unit forward into the Peach orchard where they were slaughtered by General Longstreets advance. He would be wounded and loose his right leg but awarded the Medal of Honor for his valiant services.

[4] General Meade was the commander who took of the Union Army after the firing of Hooker. He was altered of this promotion right before the battle took place and had to ride immediately to Gettysburg. He arrived the night of July 1st after the first day of fighting. He would go on to lead the Unions to victory and turn around the Union’s chances for winning the war.

[5] Boonsboro is located in Maryland and at the base of South Mountain in Washington County. It is located right in between Hagerstown and Frederick, Maryland. It was founded in 1792 by George and William Boone cousins of Daniel Boone and is a rural little town. As lee’s Army retreated from Gettysburg they based through Boonsboro but clashed with Union forces, which led to minor skirmishes.   

[6] Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper was a local paper in Rochester, New York. Look to footnote 1.

[7] These are just a few of the units from Massachusetts that actually were present at the Battle of Gettysburg. These were the most probable regiments who actually saw battle being in the higher corps. The other corps were mostly filled with reserves. As a side note the 1st Company of Massachusetts Sharpshooters were unattached to the 106th Pennsylvania. Information was found at www.michiganinthewar.org.

[8] Boston was the capital city of Massachusetts and is famous for sending divisions to aid the Union cause. Units such as the 54th Massachusetts are among these famous regiments. Lowell was one of the larger cities in Massachusetts at this time. It was the major producer of textile and manufacturing city in Massachusetts. Located just Northeast of Boston and located on the Merrimack River.

[9] Information found on www.lowellma.gov. November 15, 2010. Website designed 2010 City of Lowell, MA.

[10] Boston Daily Advertiser was located in Boston Massachusetts. Look to footnote 1.

[11] Lowell Daily Citizen and News was the local newspaper for the city of Lowell. Look to footnote 1.

Project

I have begun writing my paper and it is coming to together slowly but surely. I have formed an opening paragraph and working together on the second paragraph and forming a constructive argument to make the paper flow. I will be working on it all throughout this week and will be posting my updated paper as the week goes on. If you guys would like to look at it and maybe point out any observations you guys have on it and I would be glad to do the same for anyone else. Hope you guys are making progress on your projects as well.

Project Progress

So as I stated in my last blog I have found an argument: The further you lived from PA and depending on the newspaper you received the less you knew about the aftermath and information on the Battle of Gettysburg you less you probably knew. I am going to mix in the newspapers of Bangor, ME, Boston, MA, New York City, NY, and Rochester, NY. Now I feel like that may not be enough to cover 8 pages but at the same time feel like it might be. I may want to keep the paper from Philadelphia, PA and Harrisburg, PA but feel that may be over doing it. So I am kind of caught in between the two possibilities. I can always add it all in and then take out what I don’t need or just get as much as I can from my original idea and see where that takes me. However, even with all of that all the newspapers that I have been researching have been very informative and detailed with events. Surprisingly the paper from Rochester has been just as good as the major paper from New York City.

Project Update

So I have been researching further into my project and I believe that I am going to attempt to argue the difference between the newspapers of big cities and smaller towns outside the cities. The two cities I want to concentrate on are New York City and Boston. I will compare them to Rochester, New York  and Lowell, MA. What i want to look at is how each newspaper covered the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg, how long they covered it for, and what they really focused on. The papers I will be using are The New York Herald, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated News Paper, Boston Daily Advertiser, and Lowell Daily Citizen and News. If there is room to spare which I am assuming there might be I will compare those papers to two in Pennsylvania. One out of Philadelphia and one out of a smaller town. I still need to look into which one I want to research. I believe that these 3 states, and 4 to 6 newspapers will be able to give me the insight I need into how big cities cover the aftermath of the battle vs. the smaller towns.

Project Progress

So as the days go by the research is becoming a little more tedious and less exciting. The papers in the Northern States are harder to find information in those papers since regiments from their states are less likely to actually have fought in the battle. This is certainly making my argument a little harder I believe and my research more demanding. My fear though that if I open up my topic too much I won’t be able to fit it into 8 pages and if I shrink it the same result will happen. I think What I want to do is maybe just look at papers from places like Maine and Minnesota for papers in the North since they had famous regiments fighting in the battle. Besides those two northern states the fighting was mostly done by Pennsylvanian regiments and brigades. I think that with some more in-depth research on now just certain papers I will be able to establish a firm argument and solid evidence and information to support it.

Project

So I have been able to develop an argument that I think will prove to a good one. I am going to argue that the further away you lived from Gettysburg and the smaller the city you lived in you would be more likely to hear less and less about the battle and the aftermath. The bigger the city the better the chance you have of hearing about it. I think it will prove to be a great argument and help me narrow me search to certain cities and newspapers without shrinking my scope too much and not leaving myself open to looking at too much and running into something that may has already been talked about. The cities I want to focus on are New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Bangor, and one to two more smaller towns. If any of you guys have some feedback on what you think of my argument let me know.

Topic Proposal

Dates subject to change on timeline:

Justin Farrell

October 11, 2010

Prof. Osborne

History Methodology

Proposal

            For my topic I plan on researching and writing about how cities and newspapers covered the celebration and aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg. I will read through old 19th century newspapers such as the New York Herald and look at how long they covered the aftermath of the battle of long their citizens celebrated it for as compared to a newspaper from Maine and see what information they had and how long they covered it. If I cannot fine enough information on this topic alone I will compare how the papers of the North covered the celebration and for how long as compared to how the Sothern newspapers covered the defeat at the battle and for how long.

            These topics are significant because especially the first one is bringing both small and large newspapers into the light and showing how covering big events was hard because there was no email or anything like that. They had a much more difficult time covering events since they had to wire information in and write about what they knew at the time. This also leads to having both a morning and evening paper. This will bring into the light how people treated the victory and if they clung to it as a symbol of hope in the North or if after about a week they just moved on and waited for the next big even to take place. The second topic is just as interesting because it is comparing the two sides. Both of their respective papers had ample information on the battle but each side a different story to tell. The South especially having lost the battle had to report to people and they may have twisted it a bit to make it sound more cheerful or maybe the told it straight as it was. How long did the South cover the defeat versus how long the North covered the victory? What opinions the South had on their army compared to the opinions the North had their army? These are questions that each paper had to cover.

            The content of this is important because I can understand how the North felt after this great victory and how people in certain areas felt about the victory and how long they celebrated it for. Also I can see how long the papers covered the aftermath of the battle and what they switched too when they thought the time of coverage was up. Also if I was to go to option two I could how each side of the country felt about the events that occurred. How long the South papers talked about the defeat and how people reacted versus how people in the North celebrated and felt after the battle. 

            The following are some of the sources that I have used so far for research on my topic.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier, Contained information that was wired to Maine and their newspapers. Information was on cavalry movements for the Unions and information from the aftermath of the battlefield.

“The Terrific Three Day’s Battle of Gettysburg- The Great Friday Victory”, New York Herald. Contains information on the battle news in the city of New York, how the city feels, and the death of the soldiers from New York.

New York Herald. Monday July 6, 1863 covers the victory on the whole first page. Mixed with reports on casualties and a message on the victory from Gen. Meade.

New York Herald. Thursday July 9, 1863 covers the aftermath of the battle, the movements of both armies, and the joy and celebrations of people has begun to die down and disappear.

New York Herald. Friday July 10, 1863 covers engagements at Boomsboro and small dispatches from the Gettysburg on the aftermath but the articles are becoming smaller and less important to people.

New York Herald. Saturday July 11,1863 columns begin to become smaller on Gettysburg. Information on Rebel accounts of the battle, movement of troops, and deaths. However, majority of focus is moving away from Gettysburg.

United States Gazette and Philadelphia North American. Monday July 6, 1863 covers the feeling of victory and the retreat of Lee’s Army.

United States Gazette and Philadelphia North American. Wednesday July 8, 1863 covers the continued celebrations in Philadelphia.

Unites States Gazette and Philadelphia North American. Friday July 10, 1863 covers deaths and casualties but all information of Gettysburg has begun to dwindle and has been reduced to just small articles.

All this information was found on the link for 19th Century Newspapers on the library’s website. I have also been able to find information on the New York Times website and will look through the archives to see what I can find as well.

            A timeline of my work follows:

October 11th -14th will look through more articles on both websites and in the archives.

October 20th – 22nd begin to craft my essay portion of the project and outline how I will go about writing the paper.

October 25th – 29th write the paper and take it to the writing center to get it reviewed.

November 1st– 3rd complete the project by writing the final draft and will have the writing center look at it one more time. Write my final copy.           

Project Update

Hey guys hope you’re weeks are progressing nicely and midterms aren’t kicking anyone’s ass. So I have done a little more research and Have yet to have a major break through on the editors and what they wrote about the aftermath and feeling of people in their cities after the Battle of Gettysburg. I am going to look into only a certain number of paper’s and see who the editor was and then just focus on the editorials that they wrote after the battle and see how long they even decided to cover it. Also I will compare that to the smaller papers and how their editors covered the aftermath of the battle. Also Kristina I have the paper I wrote last year that have the sources that may have information on the shelling of Carlisle and Stewart’s movements/actions. Just let me know if you want me to email them to you of print them off for you.

Project

Hey all. So As I have begun to research more in-depth I have begun to find out that the newspapers in certain areas varied. Papers such as the New York Herald and the United States and Philadelphia Gazette had a lot of information on the battles but as the days dragged on they began to report less and less on the feeling of their cities and the aftermath of the battle. They simply just move on to the next best thing. The smaller paper’s such as the  Bangor Daily Whig and Courier had to report on the information they received which took longer so they would be filling their readers in on information that may have been reported on the day before in bigger papers. They had to wait longer for their reporters at Gettysburg to wire information to them. They also didn’t write about the battle that long after it finally ended. So so far it has been rather interesting to see how the papers varied. I plan on looking into more papers from the New England are next to see how they covered the victory.

Project topic and research

Hey guys so after class on Monday I have continued doing research on the topic about the newspapers. What I have begun to find out is that New York and Philadelphia newspapers go into the most detail about the battle and about how the city feels. They each give information from the battlefield and what each army is doing. As the day progressed I began to find out that the papers began to shorten the information from the battlefield and on how the city felt. They began focus more on the troop movements and impending battles that could come. The 19th century newspapers link on the database section of the library’s website has been extremely helpful in finding this information so far.  I have also begun to find out that the information on the battle and how the citizens of smaller towns felt in their own papers is all depending on what information these papers got from the big boys in Philadelphia and New York. So they may be giving new information on the victory on July 10th that was in the New York Herald on July 9th. It is becoming pretty interesting.

Project Idea

Hey guys so after doing more research I have found some interesting topics that hopefully could fit the requirement of the research paper. What I have found after searching through the databases on the library’s website is that I am planning on maybe looking into the either the celebrations by cities after the victory at the Battle of Gettysburg and what the North felt about their chances. I also was considering looking into the burning and shelling of Carlisle and the Carlisle Barracks and how Carlisle rebuilt after that. I think these two would be interesting topics of history to look at and somewhat easy to research with the help of our archives and the newspapers from that time period. So far I was able to locate a lot of articles on the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg through the 19th Century Newspapers link. Let me know what you guys think.

Project Topic

Hey guys hope you all are having a good week so far. So I have been doing some thinking on possible topics for our new project. What I have come up with is topics that are related to the Battle of Gettysburg. My initial idea is writing about Robert E. Lee. Most historians blame Gen. Longstreet or Gen. Stewart for the loss. However, I was going to take a different approach to it a blame Gen. Lee for the loss. I was going to talk about his plans at the battle the and the constant stubbornness he showed by ignoring Gen. Longstreet who was probably right in not fighting there at all. I have two books that may help with this project so far. One is on Stewart called Saber and Scapegoat and General James Longstreet. My overall goal is to prove that Gen. Lee is to blame for the loss and the slaughter of his men not Longstreet or Stewart who most like to blame. I think this can be narrowed down and focus in on one event such as Pickett’s Charge which was an ultimate disaster for the Confederates. Let me know what you guys think.

Letter Project

Hey guys in the final stages of completing my letter project. Feel like I have researched all that I can on the matter. Have a good amount of information this Lemuel Terrel or Lemuel Terrell character. Some of the other content within the letter was a little more difficult to look up and find. But I feel like I have a good amount of information the people and certain events that are stated in my letter. Hope all of you guys are doing well on this project.  Best of 0f luck on the successful completion of it.

Project Update

Well I have finally been able to track down this Lemuel Terrell character. However, I have stumbled upon something very interesting in my research. While looking for him which has taken me about 5 days and with help from Mrs. Bombaro and Jim from the Archives I have discovered that Lemuel Terrell, which is what the 1860 and 1880 Federal Census say. May also be the Lemuel Terrel in the 1840 census. Both of whom lived in New York and then apparently moved to Pennsylvania and in 1880 when recorded had a family as well. Also as a side note I have come across a Lemuel Terrel who lived in Virginia around the time when the 1840 Census was taken. The trail goes cold on him after that. Now it’s just piecing the two gentlemen together who may be the same person just under a different spelling. Keep all you updated.

Research on Letter

Hello all. Hope all is well and that the letters are going well. Still trying to track down this Lemuel Terrell character. Working on how to find more information on him. Getting plenty of information on Governor Curtin. Actually there is no place I haven’t looked that hasn’t given me information on him, whether that is a little or a lot. Was wondering if anyone had the website for the course and would be kind enough to give it to me. I think I may have copied it down wrong and therefore can’t get into it. Good luck with the project and see you guys tomorrow.

Letter Research

Hey guys hope you all are having a great weekend. I have been able to find a great amount of information on Andrew Gregg Curtin the Governor of Pennsylvania during the Civil War. However, the gentleman who wrote him the letter I am researching is becoming quite difficult to find. I have tried looking him up in ancestory.com and they don’t even have him listed. I have also tried looking him up through another database but can’t recall it off the top of my head. Will start searching for him a different way now. If anyone needs any help let me know.

Hey all hope you guys are having a good week. So I have been busy researching my letter and the people in it. So far I am getting results on one of my people but coming up short on the other. However, My bigger question is on the library assignment. With the books can someone clarify what we are exactly supposed to do? I am a little confused on that part. If anyone needs help on something don’t hesitate to ask.

Hey guys hope everyone’s week is going well. Read through my letter today and surprisingly it was very legible and easy to understand. Luckily for me the recipient of the letter Gov. Curtin went to Dickinson College and there is an enormous drop file on him. I have yet to start research on the other gentleman who wrote the letter but will start tomorrow. I am also in the process beginning the research assignment and think I may just use my letter to help me with the whole project due for Sunday. If anyone has any advice on how they are doing theirs it would greatly appreciated. I am just using the information we received in class. Have a great week.

Second Post

Hey guys just about to start writing the essay on, What is History? and have somewhat of an idea about what I am going to say. The Whig book seems easy enough to understand but would be up for any advice from someone who has started on how I should go about using it? My bigger question is how do I use the Tey book? I understand it but I feel like it was of a story than a guide to help us understand what history is. Let me know if anyone has any good ideas. Hope you guys are doing well with this assignment.

Hey guys started reading last night and so far find the Butterfield book to be pretty interesting. Haven’t started the other one yet, but managed to get the last copy remaining in the bookstore this morning.