Fall 2016:

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
A multi-disciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the regions through a study of their history, economics, politics, literature, and culture in transnational and comparative perspective. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework that will prepare students for more specialized courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of LALC studies. Required of all LALC majors.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 200-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and FLST 210-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
LALC 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
LALC 300-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01 and ENGL 370-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
LALC 300-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.
1330:TF   BOSLER 313
LALC 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and AFST 320-03. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
LALC 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: SPAN 305. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 341 and is taught in Spanish.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
0800:W   DENNY 315
LALC 550-01 Female Political Participation in Argentina
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-03 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 370-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
Courses Offered in FLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 210-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-02 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-01 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: 305. This course is cross-listed as LALC 341.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 370-01 and LALC 300-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
SPAN 380-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.