Author: einbende (page 2 of 2)

Fall 2012

Course Offerings Fall 2012

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
1330:MR   TOME 115
AFST 100-02 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
AFST 310-05 Anthropology/Music – Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:T   ALTHSE 08
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-03 Latina/o Studies
Instructor: Laura Grappo
1330:MR   DENNY 21
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 222-01 Contemp Peoples of Latin Amer
Instructor: Kjell Enge
1230:MWF   DENNY 21
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
ANTH 345-01 Anthropology/Music – Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:T   ALTHSE 08
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 314-01 Cuba’s Economy
Instructor: Sinan Koont
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 130-01 Latin American History I
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
0900:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 315-01 Immigration Race Nation in LA
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
1500:MR   WESTC 1
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Intro Latin American Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 242-01 Brazilian Cultural/Soc Iss
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1030:MWF   BOSLER 308
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
LALC 490-01 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
LALC 550-01 Independent Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 242-01 Brazilian Cultural/Soc Iss
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1030:MWF   BOSLER 308
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 251-01 Latin Amer Govt & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
1330:MR   DENNY 313
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 341-01 St in Latin Amer 20C Txts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
SPAN 350-01 Studies in Latino Texts
Instructor: Mariana Past
1230:MWF   BOSLER 213

Cuba Mosaic

Cuba Mosaic

 

Also see a story and photos taken by Carl Socolow ’77 in the Dickinson magazine

 

Last spring, I accompanied a group of students and faculty on a Dickinson Mosaic in Cuba. As college photographer, I was photographing the group to illustrate the cultural and international experience that has become a hallmark of a Dickinson education. I had also been invited by Victor Casaus to exhibit a series of photographs that I had made in Mexico in 2006 as a Guggenheim Fellow. Casaus had participated in Dickinson’s 10th-annual Semana Poética last fall and is director of Central Pablo, an arts and culture organization in Havana.

Click link above to read more.

 

 

 

Indigenous Latin America week kicks off with a film by Valeria Mapelman and Phillip Cox

Trailier

 

Mbya, Tierra en Rojo, is a film that shows the ongoing struggle of the indigenous Mbya Guaraní community in northeast Argentina to gain rights for their land, receive basic social services and to be recognized by the Argentine state. The directors lived in the community for many months and got to know the community and their daily fight for survival. The film shows how the indigenous populations of Argentina are still on the margen of national consciousness and reflects the persisting colonial ideology and erasure of the indigenous identity. Through the portrayal of daily activities, relationships and universal sentiments as satisfying hunger or caring for loved ones, the film relates a personal quality to the audience that stirs compassion in the viewers and makes us relate to their situation.

 

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The second event of the week was a presentation by Hernán Ávila Montaño on the forested richly biodiverse region of the Isiboro Securé Indigenous Territory or TIPINIS in central lowland Bolivia. Hernán gave an overview of the history of indigenous mobilization and protests from 1990 up through today.  He focused on the current struggle between the Bolivian state, the TIPINIS and the interest of private corporations in constructing a highway that would run straight through the territory. In addition, it would destroy and disrupt this environment which is home to many different species of flora and fauna. 

 

Hernán explained that there were a number of marches in protest in 1990, 1996 and 2002 that indigenous communities led to fight for their land rights. Dating back to the late nineteenth century and leading up to the Bolivian Revolution in 1952, there has been an active rural and indigenous political tradition that has resisted the privatization of indigenous communal lands. Protests, ‘sit-ins’ and marches have been used in the past to fight for representation land and civil rights.

The fight continues up until today, raising questions of how to modernize Bolivia, create economic opportunities for foreign investment that will lead to  growth, however it also involves the exploitation of the land and the people who inhabit it. Below is a paragraph from an online journal that summarizes the start of the march. In 2011,

“Beginning on 15 August, lowland indigenous movements—in alliance with fractions of the highland indigenous movement, and later with the support of the urban labour movement—launched a 600-kilometre, 65-day march of protest from Beni to La Paz to prevent the construction of the highway. The march, after having been denounced by state managers as an imperialist conspiracy, and violently repressed en route by police forces on 25 September, eventually forced the Morales government to capitulate to its demands, at least temporarily.”

 

Hernán explained to us that a new constitution was established in 2009 which recognizes the political and juridicial plurality that exists in Bolivia and deemed the TIPINIS as a protected “untouchable” ecological zone. However, a law was created called, el derecho de consulta (Law of Consult) that would discuss the TIPINIS’ status as untouchable and consult the indigenous communities on the construction of the road and measures to be taken to protect the territory from be settled illegally in the future.

 

The marches from Beni to la Paz were repressed violently by Bolivian police, which caused an uproar throughout the country. The consult law also opened up national controversy over the road and the TIPINIS as it has ambiguous connotations for the legal battles to follow. Because the contract between the Bolivian government and the Brazilian companies have already been made, it is difficult to foresee how Evo Morales is going to deal with the strong rural movements throughout Bolivia.

 

 

 

 

Indigenous Latin America: October 1-4, 2012

A week of events co-sponsored by the Center for Global Study and Engagement; the Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies Program; the Office of Diversity Initiatives; the Community Studies Center; and the departments of Anthropology and History

Monday, October 1, 7 p.m., East College 405
Mbya, tierra en rojo [Mbya, Red Earth or We Are the Indians], 2008. Film presentation followed by Q&A by filmmaker Valeria Mapelman

Tuesday, October 2, 7 p.m., East College 405
Territorio en Resistencia: Indigenous Mobilization in Contemporary Bolivia. Lecture by Bolivian sociologist and social activist Hernán Ávila Montaño

Wednesday, October 3, 7 p.m., East College 405
Octubre Pilagá: Relatos sobre el silencio [Pilagá October: Tales about Silence], 2010. Film presentation followed by Q&A by filmmaker Valeria Mapelman

Thursday, October 4, 7:30 p.m., Althouse 106
Indigenous Latin America: Reclaiming the Past and Building the Future. Roundtable with Valeria Mapelman and Hernán Ávila Montaño. Co-moderated by Professor Maria Bruno and Amanda Wildey (’13) 

Valeria Mapelman  

After ten years working in photography and film in Chile, Valeria Mapelman returned to her native Buenos Aires in 2010 to co-direct her first feature-length documentary, Mbya, Tierra en Rojo [Mbya, Red Land or We Are the Indians], with Philip Cox. Filmed with the Mbya Guarani communities of the Kuña Pirú Valley, in Northeastern Argentina, this documentary presents an intimate view of the challenges faced by the Mbya Guarani to keep sustainable communities in a hostile sociocultural and political environment. Praised by critics for its complex portrayal of the Myba reality that avoids condescension, this film received the Human Rights Prize at the 2006 Buenos Aires Festival of Independent Cinema. In 2005, she began working with testimonies of survivors of the 1947 massacre in La Bomba, among the Pilagá communities of northeastern Argentina. These testimonies formed the bases of her 2010 film Octubre Pilagá, Relatos sobre el Silencio [Pilagá October: Tales about Silence] and of her collaboration with the Research Network about Genocide and Indigenous Policies in Argentina which resulted in the multi-authored book History of Argentine Cruelty: Julio A. Roca and the Genocide of First Peoples, coordinated by Osvaldo Bayer. She also produced Debates about Genocide of Argentina’s First Peoples and the Limits of Justice, an interactive DVD in collaboration with the Course on Human Rights of the University of Buenos Aires.

Hernán Ávila Montaño

Bolivian sociologist and social activist who has been working with indigenous communities of the Bolivian Amazon since 2001. From 2001-2004, as part of the NGO Centro de Investigación y Promoción del Campesinado (CIPCA), Hernán worked with the communities surrounding the town of San Ignacio de Moxos in the process of defining and legalizing their indigenous lands. In 2005, he began working with the NGO Centro de Estudios Jurídicos e Investigación Social (CEJIS) as an assistant to Miguel Peña, one of five presidents of the Constitutional Congress, in the writing the new Constitution after the election of Evo Morales which defined Bolivia as a plurinational state. He has also worked with the movement of the Indigenous Territory of the Isiboro-Securé (TIPNIS) to protest, and ultimately to stop, the construction of a paved road through this protected region. He is currently the director of CEJIS in Trinidad, where he advises indigenous groups in the Department of Beni on their defense of their territorial and cultural rights. Through this experience, he is considered to be an expert of the new Bolivian Constitution, particularly the components that define the rights and autonomy of indigenous groups to defend and determine the uses of their territories

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