Category: Courses

LALC Spring 2017 Courses Offer

SPRING 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
LALC 121-02 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Kimberly McNair
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-02. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
LALC 200-01 Latina/o Popular Culture
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-01. This course will examine how the increasing diversity of audiences, voices, and participants in popular culture point to deficits, needs, and changes in American culture. Focusing specifically on Latinas/os, we will analyze representation of Latinas/os in a variety of different genres music, film, sports, and television for what they tell us about race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and language. We will look particularly at how Latinas/os negotiate mainstream media representations and create new forms of culture expression. Exploring how Latinas/os produce media representations that defy both narrow understandings of Latinidad as well as dominant U.S. culture, class discussion will explore how identity is produced and contested through popular culture.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
LALC 200-02 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01 and PORT 380-01. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
LALC 231-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 131-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as HIST 131.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
LALC 295-01 Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 295-01.Taught in Spanish. This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: SPAN 231. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 295.
1500:TR   ALTHSE 109
LALC 301-01 Undocumented in America
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 303-01.”Undocumented immigrants,” Luis Alberto Urrea writes, “have no way to tell you what they have experienced . . . They are, by the very nature of their experience, invisible.” In actuality, the undocumented aren’t invisible, so much as “hidden in plain sight,” they are exempted of legal membership, deprived of political rights, and confined to spaces outside of recognition or public concern. How do producers of culture try to capture lives and experiences that are silenced and invisible to the broader public? This interdisciplinary course will try to engage directly with both the history of legal and economic parameters that designate one as undocumented and how narratives, artistic representations, and media that endeavor to portray and symbolize these particular immigrants. This class will pay particular attention to how legal, political, and economic designations of immigrant’s “illegal” or “undocumented” status depend on and sustain U.S. discourse about race and ethnicity.
1030:TR   DENNY 21
LALC 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 304-01 and PORT 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese.This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and AFST 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
LALC 390-01 Do Your Friends Really Like You?
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
1500:M   WESTC 1
LALC 550-01 Female Political Participation in Argentina
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
AFST 100-02 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Kimberly McNair
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-02. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
AFST 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 304-01 and PORT 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 Latina/o Popular Culture
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01. This course will examine how the increasing diversity of audiences, voices, and participants in popular culture point to deficits, needs, and changes in American culture. Focusing specifically on Latinas/os, we will analyze representation of Latinas/os in a variety of different genres music, film, sports, and television for what they tell us about race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and language. We will look particularly at how Latinas/os negotiate mainstream media representations and create new forms of culture expression. Exploring how Latinas/os produce media representations that defy both narrow understandings of Latinidad as well as dominant U.S. culture, class discussion will explore how identity is produced and contested through popular culture.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 210-01 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02 and PORT 380-01. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 304-01 and LALC 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as AFST 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
PORT 380-01 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01 and LALC 200-02. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 295-01 Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 295-01.Taught in Spanish. This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: 231. This course is cross-listed as LALC 295
1500:TR   ALTHSE 109
SPAN 410-01 Do Your Friends Really Like You?
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07

LALC Studies Fall 2016 Courses Offer

Fall 2016:

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
A multi-disciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the regions through a study of their history, economics, politics, literature, and culture in transnational and comparative perspective. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework that will prepare students for more specialized courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of LALC studies. Required of all LALC majors.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 200-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and FLST 210-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
LALC 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
LALC 300-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01 and ENGL 370-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
LALC 300-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.
1330:TF   BOSLER 313
LALC 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and AFST 320-03. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
LALC 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: SPAN 305. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 341 and is taught in Spanish.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
0800:W   DENNY 315
LALC 550-01 Female Political Participation in Argentina
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-03 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 370-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
Courses Offered in FLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 210-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-02 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-01 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: 305. This course is cross-listed as LALC 341.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 370-01 and LALC 300-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
SPAN 380-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.

Spring 2013

Course Offerings Spring 2013

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
AFST 220-02 Caribbean Diasporic Identities
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
0900:TR   DENNY 204
AFST 235-01 Introduction to Caribbean St
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:TR   ALTHSE 106
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 Caribbean Diasporic Identities
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
0900:TR   DENNY 204
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 236-01 Latin America Economics
Instructor: Sebastian Berger
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 110
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Intro Latin American Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 121-01 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
LALC 122-01 Introduction to Caribbean St
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:TR   ALTHSE 106
LALC 200-01 Border Feminisms
Instructor: Gloria Garcia
1500:MR   DENNY 203
LALC 200-02 Caribbean Diasporic Identities
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
0900:TR   DENNY 204
LALC 236-01 Latin America Economics
Instructor: Sebastian Berger
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 110
LALC 300-01 Writing Chile in the 19th C
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
1030:TR   BOSLER 314
LALC 300-02 Rethinking Brazilian Lit
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1130:MWF   BOSLER 321
LALC 490-01 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
LALC 500-01 Independent Study
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 380-01 Rethinking Brazilian Lit
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1130:MWF   BOSLER 321
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 380-01 Writing Chile in the 19th C
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
1030:TR   BOSLER 314
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 202-05 Border Feminisms
Instructor: Gloria Garcia
1500:MR   DENNY 203

Fall 2012

Course Offerings Fall 2012

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
1330:MR   TOME 115
AFST 100-02 Intro to Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
0900:TR   ALTHSE 207
AFST 310-05 Anthropology/Music – Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:T   ALTHSE 08
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-03 Latina/o Studies
Instructor: Laura Grappo
1330:MR   DENNY 21
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 222-01 Contemp Peoples of Latin Amer
Instructor: Kjell Enge
1230:MWF   DENNY 21
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
ANTH 345-01 Anthropology/Music – Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
1330:T   ALTHSE 08
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 314-01 Cuba’s Economy
Instructor: Sinan Koont
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 130-01 Latin American History I
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
0900:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 315-01 Immigration Race Nation in LA
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
1500:MR   WESTC 1
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Intro Latin American Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 242-01 Brazilian Cultural/Soc Iss
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1030:MWF   BOSLER 308
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
1030:MWF   DENNY 211
LALC 490-01 Lat Am Interdisciplinary Res
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
LALC 550-01 Independent Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
:
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 242-01 Brazilian Cultural/Soc Iss
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
1030:MWF   BOSLER 308
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 251-01 Latin Amer Govt & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
1330:MR   DENNY 313
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 341-01 St in Latin Amer 20C Txts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
SPAN 350-01 Studies in Latino Texts
Instructor: Mariana Past
1230:MWF   BOSLER 213

Courses Spring ’12

LALC Courses

  • LALC 201  Introduction to Latin American Studies  TF 1:30  Ruhl
  • LALC 490  Latin American Interdisciplinary Research TBD  Borges

LALC Electives

AFST 100  Introduction to Africana Studies  TR 9:00-10:15  Thompson
AFST 235  Introduction to Caribbean Studies  TR 10:30 Moonsammy
AFST 310-01  Caribbean & African Diaspora   W 1:30-4:30 Moonsammy
AFST 310-11 Literature to the Rescue: The Case of Haiti MR 3:00-4:15 Brindeau

ECON 214  Cuba: Sustainability  R 1:30-4:30 Koont & Rose
ECON 236  Latin American Economies   MWF 9:30-10:20 Koont

HIST 131  Latin American History II   TR 9:00-10:15  Borges
HIST 283  Latin American-US Relations   TR 1:30-2:45  Borges

SOC 230  Cuba: Sustainability    R 1:30-4:30 Koont & Rose

WGST 300-02  Border Feminisms    MR 3:00-4:15  Garcia

PORT 242  Brazilian Cultural & Social Issues  MWF 10:30 Castellanos

SPAN 321  Late Colonial & 19th C LA Literatures  MR 1:30 Delutis-Eichenberger
SPAN 400  The Pen, the Sword & Pillars of Salt  W 1:30-4:30 Frohlich

FREN 364 Literature to the Rescue: The Case of Haiti MR 3:00-4:15 Brindeau

 

Dickinson in South America

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Spring 2013

Cuenca, Ecuador

Mendoza, Argentina