Category: News and Events (page 1 of 3)

Tamales Build Community

Jackie Amezcua, Gaby Corcoran, and Leo García

If I’ve learned anything from my Mexican culture, it’s that nothing brings us together faster than food. This proved to be true yet again when guest speaker Professor Jeffrey Pilcher of the University of Toronto visited campus in collaboration with the LALC and History departments. Pilcher’s talk explored the topic of beer and food as a focus of cultural study and understanding. Prior to his lecture, however, professors, students, staff, and our guest speaker came together to make a traditional Mexican dish: tamales. Although different forms of tamales are eaten throughout Latin America, Professor Héctor Reyes Zaga revealed his family’s top secret tamale recipe from México. Many Latino and non-Latino students, faculty, and staff came together to enjoy the delicious history told through tamales. There’s nothing quite as gratifying as joining mi gente from all over Latin America to enjoy dishes I’d normally eat during holidays and instead creating new memories, bridging the invisible geographic borders that divide our countries. 3,000 miles away from home, I find community in sharing cultural dishes and joking about who cries first after having eaten a spicy dish. Food brings us together because regardless of whatever language you speak, or wherever you’re from, we can all enjoy a mouthwatering plate of rich food.

By Jacqueline Amezcua (LALC Studies major ’19)

 

Noted Latin Americanist and food historian Jeffrey Pilcher was in residence at Dickinson on March 30 and 31, 2017. He delivered the annual Pflaum lecture and participated in a Clarke Forum-sponsored salon to discuss his work. Before the lecture, students, faculty, and guests got together for a tamales-making session, supervised by LALC Studies and Spanish Department Professor Héctor Reyes-Zaga.

 

“La Cucaracha” and Political Satire

“La Cucaracha” and Political Satire
Political cartoonist, satirist & television writer, Lalo Alcaraz 
 
Tuesday, February 7, 2017 
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.
 
Alcaraz will present an illustrated lecture on his cartoons, work in political satire, and writing/producing in Hollywood.
 
Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally syndicated, politically themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” which is read in American newspapers nationwide, including the Los Angeles Times. Lalo’s comics are syndicated by Universal Uclick, home of “Doonesbury” and “The Boondocks.” Lalo produced editorial  cartoons for The LA Weekly from 1992-2010 and now creates  editorial cartoons in English and Spanish for Universal. Lalo’s books include Latino USA: A Cartoon History (2000 by Basic Books), and Migra Mouse: Political Cartoons On Immigration,(2004). Alcaraz also authored the first collection of his daily comic strips, “La Cucaracha.” (2004, Andrews-McMeel Publishing.) His upcoming book is Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States (2014 by Basic Books). Lalo taught editorial illustration at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles in 2013. Alcaraz was a writer and producer of “Bordertown,” the animated TV show on FOX, which
ran for one triumphant 13 episode season before being canceled. Lalo is also consultant on the upcoming 2017 Pixar film, COCO. Alcaraz was a segment producer on Al Madrigal’s (Daily Show) “Half Like Me” comedy special for Fusion/ABC. Lalo is also featured on the upcoming HBO Latino program “Habla y Vota” special along with George Lopez and Jorge Ramos.
Lalo Alcaraz has received five Southern California Journalism Awards for Best Cartoon in  Weekly Papers, and numerous other awards and honors.
 
This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies, and Spanish & Portuguese.

Posada Conference Keynote Speech – Videos

On Nov. 5 and Nov. 6, 2016, Dickinson College successfully hosted Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satire in Latin America, a two-day conference sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This international conference provided a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America.
The conference keynote speaker is William Beezley (University of Arizona), noted historian of Mexico and Latin America and author and editor of numerous books, including Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico(1987), Latin American Popular Culture: An Introduction (Linda Curcio-Nagy, 2000), and A Companion to Mexican History and Culture (2011).

Access to the whole speech can be found here.

Posada Conference Poster IMG_1412 IMG_1400FullSizeRender[8]

Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo – Photos Recap

On Nov. 5 and Nov. 6, 2016, Dickinson College successfully hosted Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satire in Latin America, a two-day conference sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This international conference provided a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America.

Posada Conference Poster

EXHIBIT

The Trout Gallery – the art museum at Dickinson College – has been presenting José Guadalupe Posada and the Broadside in Early Twentieth-Century Mexico since Oct. 28, 2016. For more information, visit The Trout Gallerie Exhibition Website here.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Conference Program

Friday, November 4th

5pm – Altar Offerings. Waidner-Spahr Library

6pm – Keynote Speaker. Althouse 106

Professor William Beezley, University of Arizona, “Laughter and Hope: Humor in Everyday Life in Mexico”

 

7pm – Reception. Weiss Center

7-9pm – Sugar Skull-Making Workshop.

Saturday, November 5th

8:30am Coffee – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

9:00am Panel #1 – Althouse 106

1. Gabriel Antúnez de Mayolo Kou, University of Wisconsin-Madison, “Boogie, el “americano”: el uso de parámetros globales en la adaptación cinematográfica animada de la tira cómica Boogie, el aceitoso de Fontanarrosa”

2. Lloyd Anglin, Universidad Veritas: Costa Rica, “Humor gráfico en Costa Rica: identidad y otredad 1917-1948”

10:00am Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

10:15am Panel # 2 – Althouse 106

1. Jason A. Bartles, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, “El Gaucho Jodón: Mocking Nationalism in Juan Filloy’s Ochoa Family Saga”

2. Brian Bockelman, Ripon College, “‘Poor Palms’ and Petty Politicos: The Role and Forms of Satire in the Argentine Plaza Palms Crisis of 1883”

3. María del Pilar Aja Pérez, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, “Goya’s and Goitia’s Hanged Men: Ironic and Grotesque Sociopolitical Criticism at War Periods.”

11:30am Tour of Exhibit “José Guadalupe Posada and the Mexican Penny Press” – Trout Gallery (Weiss Center)

Trout Gallery Director and Associate Professor of Art History Phillip Earenfight

12:30pm Lunch and Student Poster Presentation. HUB

2:00pm Panel # 3 – Althouse 106

1. Ana Yolanda Contreras, United States Naval Academy, “Memes humorísticos, irreverencia y crítica sociopolítica contra los ex-mandatarios guatemaltecos”

2. Elizabeth Cooper, Gettysburg College, “Correa’s #CaricaturaCrackdown: Social Media, Satire, and Free Speech in Ecuador”

3. Michele Nascimento-Kettner, Montclair State University, “‘Rir para não Chorar’: Why Laughing Matters in Brazil’s Current Political Debates?

4. José Alfredo Contreras, University of Maryland, College Park, “Current Events and Culture as Laughing Matter in Hernández and Helguera’s Monosapiens”

3:20pm Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

3:35pm Panel # 4 – Althouse 106

1. Jacqueline Avila, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, “El espectáculo on Stage and Screen: Evocations of the teatro de revistas in cine mexicano”

2. Marina Fleites, Gettysburg College, “Pushing the Critical Limits in Tomás Gutiérrez Alea’s La Muerte de un Burócrata (1966) and Guantanamera (1994)”

4:40pm Closing Reception

Posada Conference

POSADA CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 4TH, 2016:

MOCKING THE STATUS QUO: SOCIOPOLITICAL HUMOR AND SATIRE IN LATIN AMERICA

 

Posada_Revoltijo

CONFERENCE

Sociopolitical humor and satire have a long tradition in Latin America. Since the 19th century, a variety of artists and writers have contributed to its development. Mexican illustrator José Guadalupe Posada (1851-1913), whose satirical broadsides and calaveras, or “skulls,” provided a critical portrayal of social, cultural and political tensions in Mexico during the Porfiriato and the beginning of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, is considered one of the founding figures of this tradition. Many other figures took this tradition in different directions up to the present. The growth in newspaper circulation and popular media during the 20th century created new outlets for social and political humor and satire, especially in the form of political and comic cartoons. Published in newspapers and in popular graphic publications such as Tia Vicentaand Humor Registrado in Argentina, O Pasquim in Brazil, and Monos y Monadas in Peru, among others, graphic humor became the vehicle of commentary of dominant social conventions and it provided a space to challenge and subvert political structures. In addition to graphic humorists, radio and TV performers have also contributed to the genre. The list of artists, writers and performers who have followed in Posada’s footsteps is long and rich in discursive perspectives, media choices and aesthetic representations – as varied as Quino’s Mafalda, the controversial cartoons of Bonil (Javier Bonilla), the sketches of the long-running Venezuelan show Radio Rochela, and the international TV phenomenon CQC or Caiga quien caiga/Caia quem caia. Publication and performance outlets have increased and audiences have diversified with new media and digital content.

Dickinson College will host a two-day conference on Nov. 5 and 6 sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This two-day international conference provides a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America. The conference will provide an important opportunity to attend the inauguration of José Guadalupe Posada’s exhibit and aims to bring together academics working across interdisciplinary fields.

EXHIBIT

The Trout Gallery – the art museum at Dickinson College – will present José Guadalupe Posada and the Broadside in Early Twentieth-Century Mexico. This exhibition features over sixty works of graphic art by Posada and his contemporaries, including many of his best-known images of calaveras, sensationalistic crimes, natural disasters, political prints, curious phenomena, chap books, devotional images and game boards. It considers the meaning and importance of Posada’s imagery in turn-of-the century Mexico and its role in society. The exhibition is complemented by an extensive catalogue by curator Diane Miliotes as well as educational programs and a mobile application. For additional information on the exhibition see: www.troutgallery.org. The exhibit will open on Oct. 28, 2016.

 KEYNOTE SPEAKER

The conference keynote speaker will be William Beezley (University of Arizona), noted historian of Mexico and Latin America and author and editor of numerous books, including Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico(1987), Latin American Popular Culture: An Introduction (Linda Curcio-Nagy, 2000), and A Companion to Mexican History and Culture (2011).

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Friday, November 4th

5pm – Altar Offerings. Waidner-Spahr Library

6pm – Keynote Speaker Prof. William Beezley. Althouse 106

7pm – Reception. Weiss Center

7-9pm – Sugar Skull-Making Workshop. Open Arts Lab (Weiss Center). Stop by 20-30 minutes

———

Saturday, November 5th

8:30am Coffee – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

9:00am Panel #1 – Althouse 106

10:00am Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

10:15am Panel # 2 – Althouse 106

11:30am Tour of Exhibit “José Guadalupe Posada and the Mexican Penny Press” – Trout Gallery (Weiss Center)

12:30pm Lunch and Student Poster Presentation. HUB

2:00pm Panel # 3 – Althouse 106

3:10pm Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

3:30pm Panel # 4 – Althouse 106

 

REGISTRATION

Registration is free of charge, but if you want to attend the conference and you are not presenting a paper, please, fill out this form:

Registration for “Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satyre in Latin America” Conference

 

Afro-Brazilian Funk Workshop

Afro-Brazilian Funk at Dickinson, Monday, April 11

Afro-BrazilianFunk LALC April 11 bPercussion Workshop and Performance by Dendê and Banda

4:30 Workshop: Learn to play timbal with Dendê (Allison Great Hall)

7:30 Performance by Dendê and Banda (Allison Community Room)

Cuba and its Exile: Political Generations

Lecture by Silvia Pedraza (Sociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

Thursday, December 3, 2015
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.

Using the concept of political generations, Pedraza traces the evolution of the Cuban exile, mostly in Miami, and the Cuban revolution, in the island.  Political generations refers to young people that in their transition from adolescence to adulthood experienced dramatic historical events that marked their consciousness. Pedraza identifies several major political generations that developed during the course of the Cuban revolution and its exile.

This event is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the department of Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies. It is also part of the Clarke Forum’s Leadership in an Age of Uncertainty Series.

Obama Is Brazilian: (Re)Signifying Race Relations in Contemporary Brazil

Lecture by Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte (Vanderbilt University)

Thursday, November 12, 2015
Stern Great Room, 7 p.m.

Screen Shot 2015-12-07 at 11.16.43 PM

Barack Obama’s election to the American presidency in 2009 sparked a renewed interest in the theme of race in the Americas and worldwide. The sight of an African American as President of the United States led analysts to declare that North America was living in a post-racial era. But Obama’s election also had a tremendous impact on the imaginary of the African Diaspora. This lecture by Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte, Vanderbilt University, will examine his characterizations in the Brazilian media, especially in examples of political humor, such as cartoons and memes. The program is sponsored by The Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues. For more information, visit the Web site  or call 717-245-1875.

Stern Great Room, 7:00

Brazilian Race Relations and Affirmative Action Lecture

4/23 lecture

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