Literacy and Liberty


Reading a Map
Posted by: , September 5, 2018, 2:51 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

I seldom make generalized statements about myself, and I am always trying to become better at everything that I do. Nonetheless, the one thing that I can guarantee will never change is my horrible sense of direction. When I have a schedule that I must follow, it is extremely difficult for me to arrive on time unless I know exactly to where I must go. To ease my anxiety about becoming quickly lost and confused while navigating this, not even particularly large, campus, I downloaded the Dickinson app onto my cell phone. One of the features within this application includes a campus map. Using this app, I am able to search for specific buildings within several different sections of campus. For example, if one needs to locate Kaufman, one simply must type its name into the search bar and a map will appear. Despite the usefulness of this map, I find myself easily misreading the instructions and becoming more lost than I ever had been at the beginning. It is therefore necessary for me to put down my electronic map and actually ask someone to point me in the direction of my intended destination. When I inevitably get myself lost despite my usage of a map, I find it somewhat amusing (once I have found my way). An important form that literacy takes is one’s ability to read and understand a map. I am a seemingly literate individual; however, if I was to be put into a situation where my life and wellbeing depended on my ability to read a map, I would be deemed nearly entirely illiterate.




5 Comments so far
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Meredith, thank you for sharing this story! Dickinson *can* be a weirdly dizzying place, I know. What if, for your literacy narrative essay, you *narrate* a specific instance of finding/losing your way on campus? That way, you don’t even risk generalizing statements about yourself, but instead *show* us how you’re working on your sense of direction.

   Professor Seiler 09.06.18 @ 4:16 pm

I really like how you chose something that all of us, to some extent, can relate to at the moment. Coming to Dickinson has most certainly been a transition and sometimes it hard to find our way within those transitions. I agree with Professor Seiler in that it would be a great idea to make your essay a narrative of you struggling to find your way. You can definitely relate this to bigger concepts, such as growing up in general. We’re in this with you!

   Jessica 09.07.18 @ 1:34 pm

I posted a comment previously but for some reason it is failing to show up now so sorry if there is two!!

What I was saying was that I think it is great that you chose something basically all of us can relate to right now. Dickinson has definitely been a huge adjustment that has taken a lot of navigating.

I agree with Professor Seiler with the narrative idea of a specific situation! I think if you make it super specific you could also expand it to bigger concepts, such as growing up in general.

   Jessica 09.07.18 @ 2:19 pm

I really like how you chose something that all of us, to some extent, can relate to at the moment. Coming to Dickinson has most certainly been a transition and sometimes it hard to find our way within those transitions. I agree with Professor Seiler in that it would be a great idea to make your essay a narrative of you struggling to find your way. You can definitely relate this to bigger concepts, such as growing up in general. We’re in this with you!

   Jess 09.07.18 @ 2:20 pm

I relate so much to this post! I also have a terrible sense of direction and always have. This is really interesting because reading a map is not one of the first things that many people think about when they think of a literary event, so I can’t wait to see where you take it!

   Kelly Coyle 09.07.18 @ 4:34 pm



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