Month: August 2011 (Page 2 of 3)

WordPress Blog – Outline

Outline

  • Give location of course blog
  • Tell students to check email and accept invitation to system
    • Change password from auto generated to user selected
  • Overview of post screen
    • Title
    • Body
    • Formating Toolbar
    • Uploads
    • Categories
    • Tags
    • Saving Drafts
    • Publishing
  • Editing Posts
  • Deleting Posts
  • Commenting

Links

Dickinson Blog

Resources

WordPress Author Tutorial

 

WordPress Blog

Description

Dickinson hosts it’s own installation of WordPress MU (Multi User) and any class can choose to have a blog set up for their students to blog.  Wordpress is a very user friendly platform and most people easily adapt to using the program quickly.  Each person’s posts can be track for grading purposes and the platform is well suited to help engage dialogue inside and outside of the classroom.  It can be open for the public to view or closed down so only the students within the course can read the content of the posts.

This session consists of walking the students through the process of logging into the system and posting at least one test post to get accustom to the software.

Audience

Faculty & Students

Type

Instructor Led-Hands on

Time

30-45 Minutes-In Class Time

Outcomes

  • Learn location of class blog
  • Receive account information to login
  • Learn basics of posting, uploading media, & commenting
  • Post first post to blog

Want to know more?  Contact  mediacenter at dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.  You can also get a sneak peek of what we cover in our training by looking over our Training Outline.

Intro to RSS – Outline

Outline

  • RSS stands for ‘Really Simple Syndication’. Many people describe it as a ‘news feed’ that you subscribe to.
  • RSS In Plain English
  • It’s like subscribing to a magazine that is delivered to you periodically but instead of it coming in your physical mail box each month when the magazine is published it is delivered to your ‘RSS Reader’ every time your favorite website updates.
  • Both of these feed readers work a little like email. As you subscribe to feeds you’ll see that unread entries from the sites you’re tracking will be marked as bold. As you click on them you’ll see the latest update and can read it right there in the feed reader. You are given the option to click through to the actual site or move onto the next unread item – marking the last one as ‘read’.
  • Tools
    • Create a new folder in Google Reader
      • Feed settings > New folder
    • Search Blogs

Links

RSS In Plain English
Google Blog Search
Technorati
Google Reader

Resources (Class files-pdfs)

Research and Organizational Tools

Description

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is an easy, timely  way for people to keep up with what is going on at their favorite websites.  In the past, if you wanted to know if something new was posted on a site, you would have manually go to the site to see.  RSS is a way of sending those new little bits right to you.  You need to use some sort of program to collect all of this information so you can read it when you are interested.  In that way, it’s kind of like email because you open one program and all of the information is there no matter who sent it to you.

During this training we will cover what RSS is and discuss the many ways you can connect with the information these sites are sending out.  You can read it, reply to it, publicize it and other options.

Audience

Faculty, Staff, Students

Type

Instructor Led-Hands on, Overview or both

Time

20-30 minutes

Outcomes

  • Learn what RSS is and how to connect with sites that use it
  • Learn about different RSS readers
  • Learn how to search for more sites using RSS

Want to know more?  Contact  mediacenter at dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.  You can also get a sneak peek of what we cover in our training by looking over our Training Outline.

Digital Storytelling

Description

“Digital Storytelling is the practice of using computer-based tools to tell stories. As with traditional storytelling, most digital stories focus on a specific topic and contain a particular point of view. However, as the name implies, digital stories usually contain some mixture of computer-based images, text, recorded audio narration, video clips and/or music. Digital stories can vary in length, but most of the stories used in education typically last between two and ten minutes. The topics that are used in Digital Storytelling range from personal tales to the recounting of historical events, from exploring life in one’s own community to the search for life in other corners of the universe, and literally, everything in between.”

University of Houston

“Tell me a fact and I’ll learn.
Tell me a truth and I’ll believe.
But tell me a story & it will live in my heart forever.”
-Indian Proverb

“Digital Storytelling is the modern
expression of the ancient art of storytelling.
Digital stories derive their power
by weaving images, music, narrative
& voice together, thereby giving deep dimension
and vivid color to characters, situations, experiences,
and insights.”

– Leslie Rule, Center for Digital Storytelling

Audience

Faculty and Students

Type

Instructor Led – Overview or Hands on

Time

1 hour

Outcomes

  • Understand various styles/technologies available to create DS
  • Use a story prompt to start writing script
  • Know places to collect resources available through a Creative Commons License

Want to learn more?  Take a sneak peek at our training outline.

 

Storyboarding Using Comic Life – Outline

Outline

  • Showcase good examples from related classes
  • Discuss process of outlining story
  • How to transition to using comic
    • How many pages should the end product be in length?
    • Evaluate best layout for project
  • Comic Life Introduction
    • Using templates
    • Adding a new panel
    • Narrative
      • Text Bubbles
      • Text Box
      • Word Art
    • Adding Images
      • Importing
      • Taking Pictures with ISight Camera
    • Customizing Styles
    • Saving
    • Exporting
      • Export JPEG 150 dpi

Links

Comic Life Download

Resources

Comic Life Tutorial

Language Exchanges – Outline

Outline

  • Connect through Skype with remote language learners
  • Pair students and language learners together for discussion
    • If number of participants don’t align, partners will be doubled up to ensure everyone speaks
  • Have students add Skype user to their contacts
  • Text chat with user to ask if they are ready to speak
  • Call user
    • Speak first 20 minutes in language students are learning
    • Speak next 20 minutes in English
  • Students may have been assigned example questions to ask during exchange and should be writing down answers throughout conversation

Links

The Mixxer

Babylon Translation

Skype

Language Lab Intro – Outline

Outline

Introduction of Staff/Media Center

  • Introduction to installed software
    • Skype
    • Can 8
    • Antidote
  • Overview of online resources
    • Dictionaries
    • Spell check/Grammar
  • Windows and Mac language settings
  • Language specific sites
    • News
    • Entertainment
    • Helpful Hints

Links

Wordchamp – Creates mouse overs for all the words on a given page with dictionary definitions.  Great resource for introducing students to online newspapers or books in the public domain.

Project Gutenberg – Great site of public domain books.  Also works in conjuction with the site above.

The Mixxer – Organize language exchanges with native speakers via Skype.  Students can speak with their partner during our outside of class.

Babble – if you’ve seen the rather expensive Rosetta Stone software and like the principle, this is a good site.  It’s basically flash cards of words and phrases with audio.  Students add groups of vocabulary to their list and progress as they master each group.

Livemocha– rather traditional vocab and grammar excercises, though “friends” can leave comments and text anyone else on their site.  Integrates the tandem principle into the exercises with learners commenting on each other’s writing.

BBC Languages – BBC languages are very good.  They also integrate multimedia well and continue to more advanced levels than most other sites.

Google – Google tricks  – Search within site:.de  site:.fr  site:.es

Broadband TV – Watch Television from other countries


Youtube – Localized youTube  ex.  http://www.youtube.de

Advanced Video Editing

Description

Video projects can take on many forms and some stories are move involved than others.  The Media Center understands this and is prepared to train classes in higher level video editing when projects require more than what IMovie has to offer.  Final Cut Express is located in the Bosler Microroom and Media Center is a main program students use when creating a short film for Film courses.  We walk the class through the whole process of editing by working with them in a lab for a few hours.  We are also available to assist them as they are working on their projects during the rest of the semester.  The Media Center becomes a second home to these students as they work through building their projects and shaping their stories.

Audience

Faculty & Students in Film Classes

Type

Hands On-Instructor Led

Time

2-3 Hours-In Class Time

Outcomes

  1. Know how to use the software program Final Cut Express to import & edit video
  2. Have observed a variety of course related video examples.
  3. Know best practices to use when writing script.
  4. Be provided online resources to help you get started finding creative commons audio, video or image files.

Examples

The Beatles: Fame in the 21st Century- Documentary

Professor Liza Trevino- Social Documentary Course

 

Silent Witness

Prof Stephanie Gilmore

 

Intro To Video – Training Outline

Outline

Dickinson Examples:

  1. Ken Burns Style/Storytelling-Asian Art – Sherri Lullo-Imovie
  2. Ken Burns Style/Mashup – Wal-Mart – Michael Fratantuono
  3. Text/Live Motion Video – Close Reading – Writing Center
  4. Live Motion Video/WhiteBoard – Outline-Draft-Revision – Writing Center
  5. Ken Burns Style/Storytelling/Oral History – Carlisle to Andersonville – House Divided Project
  6. Green Screen/Silent – Samurai Movie – Prof Alex Bates
  7. Live Motion Video/Stop Motion – Sonnet – Prof Mark Aldrich
  8. Live Motion /Explanation – E G G C E P T I O N – Prof Christine O’Neill

Different Style Options

  1. Interview
  2. Screen Capture
  3. Explaining Style
  4. Behind the Desk/News Style
  5. Simple Animation

Assignment Preparation

Student Treatment Plan Form-(copyright Dartmouth College)
Example Video Grading Rubric

Imovie

IMovie Tutorial

  • Video Editing
    • How to record video-ISight Camera
    • How to import video from camera or computer
    • Editing
      • Selecting portions of video
      • Fine editing
      • Adding Distortions/Enhancements to video
        • Speed up/Slow Down
        • Color/Style
    • Understanding Clip Pane
      • Color coded clips (Used in Project, Favorites, Deleted)
    • Transitions
    • Titles
  • Audio
    • Pulling in tracks
    • Recording Narration
    • Layering Audio
  • Adding Images
    • Ken Burns Effect
    • Adding Distortion/Enhancement to images
      • Color
    • Saving
  • Exporting
  • Burning to DVD

Resources

Music-Sound Effects CCMixter-variety of music styles
Moby Gratis – Free music from your favorite Electronica artist (yeah, that guy)
Museopen-free classical works
Free Sound Project-Authentic Sound Effects

Images
Flickr Commons – Museum Collections
Creative Commons

Video
Archive.org
Free Public Domain Movies
Open FLV.com
Wikimedia Commons
National Archives
Stage 6
Public Domain Torrents
EMOL
Public Domain Movie Database

Fair Use Checklist-Help deciding if you can use a copyrighted work in your project

 

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