Category: Training Catalog (Page 1 of 2)

Historical Simulations Using Civilization IV

Description

Civilization IV is a PC game that allows the player to control a civilization from 4000 BC until the modern era.   The player needs to make decisions regarding resource management, diplomacy, technology research and civics in order to successfully guide the civilization into the modern era.  The game can also be modified to represent the world as closely as possible at a given point in history.

Audience

Faculty and students in political science, history, sociology and religion.

Type

Instructor Led-Hands On

Time

50-100 Minutes – In Class Time

Outcomes

  • Recognize the importance of various resources, technological advances and geographic location in historical events.
  • Understand and critique the advantages each of the civics presented in the game for the growth of the civilization.
  • Recognize and critique the argument presented by the game for the cause of conflicts throughout history focusing on resource scarcity, conflicting religions or civics, and population growth.
  • Conduct research on population trends, technology advances, role of religion, and the allocation of resources at various points in history.  (Advanced, for student mod creation projects)

Want to know more?  Contact  bryantt AT dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.

Examples

Professor Michael Fratantuono – “Globlaization, Sustainability, Security”

In this first year seminar, Professor Fratantuono had his students compare what they’d learned from “Guns, Germs, and Steel” and “Hot Flat and Crowded”  with their experience playing the game Civ IV.

Professor Ed Webb – “Empire”

In this International Studies course, Professor Webb instructed his students to play a historical mod of Civ IV that represents the western world in 1492.  Students took on the role of Spain and their first encounter with the Aztecs.  Students then compared their own actions and situation with history and used the ideas from “The Conquest of America: The Question of the Other” to discuss possible reasons for discrepancies.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/issues/issue_203/6097-Dont-Knock-the-Aztecs

Althouse

Smart Classrooms & Student Response Systems

Description

Many classrooms on campus are outfitted with an array of technologies available for faculty and student use.  From computers and projectors to datavisualizers and smart boards/sympodiums, we are ready to help you understand how to use the technologies available to you.

Audience

Faculty & Students

Type

Instructor Led-Hands on

Time

30 Minutes-Outside of Class Time

Outcomes

  • Learn to use media controllers, Smart Board/Sympodium, Projectors & Data visualizers
  • Understand basic troubleshooting techniques

Outline

Student Response Systems

Backchannel tools

Guest or Distance Presentation

 

Video Shooting Techniques

Description

Why do some videos look stylized and professional while others look like an amateur created it……even if both were done by students?  There are a few answers to that question but one key element is what techniques were used when the video was originally shot.  You can improve the look and feel of your video by understanding some basic techniques when using video equipment.  There are many different elements that work together to give your video the look and feel you are striving to create. During this session we will introduce students to best practices when shooting including lighting, miking, shooting and basics of setting your scene.

Audience

Faculty and Students

Type

Instructor Led – Hands On

Time

1 1/2 – 2 Hours

Outcomes

  • Understand basics of using, handling and storing equipment
  • Learn filming techniques
  • Learn lighting techniques
  • Learn miking techniques
  • Understand best practices in group work to ensure successful recording

 

Quick & Easy Video

Description

With the rise of YouTube, everyone wants to create videos but most people don’t realize how much time and effort it takes to edit a video.  In some cases, creating a video isn’t about telling a new story but it could be used for reflection, oral language exams, critique and other options.  These videos can be shot on a simple Flip Camera and uploaded directly to YouTube or Moodle for viewing.  If a small amount of editing is needed, Quicktime Pro is a great option compared to IMovie.

Audience

Faculty, Students and Staff

Type

Instructor Led – Hands On

Time

30-60 Minutes – In Class Time

Outcomes

  • Learn basics of using camera to records
  • Import video into Quicktime for basic editing
  • Upload files to YouTube or Moodle for viewing

Intro to Equipment

Description

The Media Center houses a large pool of video equipment for check out so classes creating videos have resources readily available to them.  Although many students have worked with some of this equipment, most do not have the full understanding of what we have available and what each piece is capable of doing.  After discussing the project your class will be working on, we can evaluate which items would need to be covered in this training and we can set up a time to bring you class to Media Center so they can get an overview of the technologies.  This training covers the basics of what we have available and how to handle the equipment.  This session does not focus on techniques and best practices when shooting video.  We do offer that session as well and the 2 trainings can be merged into one long session or they can be broken up into multiple smaller sessions.

Audience

Faculty & Students

Type

Instructor Led – Overview or Hands On

Time

30-60 Minutes

Outcomes

  • Basic knowledge of equipment for checkout
  • Understand procedures & policies related to equipment checkout
  • Comfortable handling, using & storing equipment
  • Know where the Media Center is and how to get assistance when needed

 

Social Networking for Departments & Organizations

Description

We all know that (almost) everyone uses social networking on a daily basis, especially students.  It would be great to meet people in these places so our organizations can connect with people on a more meaningful way.  This is not an easy task but there are some great resources and best practices that can help promote your organization and connect with the people you are trying to reach.

During this session will go over the heavy hitters of social media (Twitter, Facebook, Youtube….) and try to find which platforms would be best for your organization to try to use.  We will also discuss statistically what works well on these platforms and what doesn’t so you will be better informed on things that might engage your audience better than others.

Audience

Faculty, Staff, Students

Type

Instructor Led-Overview-Some hands on

Time

45 Minutes – 1 hour

Outcomes

  • Be able to understand the differences between social media platforms
  • Learn best practices to use when trying to engage your audience
  • Learning ways to dynamically feed content between different social media platforms

Want to know more?  Contact  mediacenter at dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.  You can also get a sneak peek of what we cover in our training by looking over our Training Outline.

WordPress Blog

Description

Dickinson hosts it’s own installation of WordPress MU (Multi User) and any class can choose to have a blog set up for their students to blog.  Wordpress is a very user friendly platform and most people easily adapt to using the program quickly.  Each person’s posts can be track for grading purposes and the platform is well suited to help engage dialogue inside and outside of the classroom.  It can be open for the public to view or closed down so only the students within the course can read the content of the posts.

This session consists of walking the students through the process of logging into the system and posting at least one test post to get accustom to the software.

Audience

Faculty & Students

Type

Instructor Led-Hands on

Time

30-45 Minutes-In Class Time

Outcomes

  • Learn location of class blog
  • Receive account information to login
  • Learn basics of posting, uploading media, & commenting
  • Post first post to blog

Want to know more?  Contact  mediacenter at dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.  You can also get a sneak peek of what we cover in our training by looking over our Training Outline.

Research and Organizational Tools

Description

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is an easy, timely  way for people to keep up with what is going on at their favorite websites.  In the past, if you wanted to know if something new was posted on a site, you would have manually go to the site to see.  RSS is a way of sending those new little bits right to you.  You need to use some sort of program to collect all of this information so you can read it when you are interested.  In that way, it’s kind of like email because you open one program and all of the information is there no matter who sent it to you.

During this training we will cover what RSS is and discuss the many ways you can connect with the information these sites are sending out.  You can read it, reply to it, publicize it and other options.

Audience

Faculty, Staff, Students

Type

Instructor Led-Hands on, Overview or both

Time

20-30 minutes

Outcomes

  • Learn what RSS is and how to connect with sites that use it
  • Learn about different RSS readers
  • Learn how to search for more sites using RSS

Want to know more?  Contact  mediacenter at dickinson.edu to set up a consultation.  You can also get a sneak peek of what we cover in our training by looking over our Training Outline.

Digital Storytelling

Description

“Digital Storytelling is the practice of using computer-based tools to tell stories. As with traditional storytelling, most digital stories focus on a specific topic and contain a particular point of view. However, as the name implies, digital stories usually contain some mixture of computer-based images, text, recorded audio narration, video clips and/or music. Digital stories can vary in length, but most of the stories used in education typically last between two and ten minutes. The topics that are used in Digital Storytelling range from personal tales to the recounting of historical events, from exploring life in one’s own community to the search for life in other corners of the universe, and literally, everything in between.”

University of Houston

“Tell me a fact and I’ll learn.
Tell me a truth and I’ll believe.
But tell me a story & it will live in my heart forever.”
-Indian Proverb

“Digital Storytelling is the modern
expression of the ancient art of storytelling.
Digital stories derive their power
by weaving images, music, narrative
& voice together, thereby giving deep dimension
and vivid color to characters, situations, experiences,
and insights.”

– Leslie Rule, Center for Digital Storytelling

Audience

Faculty and Students

Type

Instructor Led – Overview or Hands on

Time

1 hour

Outcomes

  • Understand various styles/technologies available to create DS
  • Use a story prompt to start writing script
  • Know places to collect resources available through a Creative Commons License

Want to learn more?  Take a sneak peek at our training outline.

 

Advanced Video Editing

Description

Video projects can take on many forms and some stories are move involved than others.  The Media Center understands this and is prepared to train classes in higher level video editing when projects require more than what IMovie has to offer.  Final Cut Express is located in the Bosler Microroom and Media Center is a main program students use when creating a short film for Film courses.  We walk the class through the whole process of editing by working with them in a lab for a few hours.  We are also available to assist them as they are working on their projects during the rest of the semester.  The Media Center becomes a second home to these students as they work through building their projects and shaping their stories.

Audience

Faculty & Students in Film Classes

Type

Hands On-Instructor Led

Time

2-3 Hours-In Class Time

Outcomes

  1. Know how to use the software program Final Cut Express to import & edit video
  2. Have observed a variety of course related video examples.
  3. Know best practices to use when writing script.
  4. Be provided online resources to help you get started finding creative commons audio, video or image files.

Examples

The Beatles: Fame in the 21st Century- Documentary

Professor Liza Trevino- Social Documentary Course

 

Silent Witness

Prof Stephanie Gilmore

 

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