Category Archives: Emma Cordell

Jaimie, Aaron, Emma Sonnet Project

Jaimie, Aaron, and Emma Sonnet Project

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“[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]“

This is yet another amazing poem written by ee cummings, published in 1952.  As with all of his works, his syntax and arrangement makes the poem seem confusing at first, but with a bit of effort, the ideas are very … Continue reading

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“Missing God”

“Missing God” is a poem written by Dennis O’Driscoll, whom I chose as my favorite contemporary poet for our class’s project.  Here is a link to the poem on Mr. O’Driscoll’s website: http://dennisodriscoll.com/poetry/missing-god This poem summarizes how most people in … Continue reading

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Children’s Poets

Some of the most underappreciated artists are, in my opinion, those who write poems and/or books for young children.  Two of my all-time favorite authors are Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein.  I remember, when I was learning to read, two of the … Continue reading

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The Lake Isle of Innisfree

“The Lake Isle of Innisfree,” first published in 1890, is one of William Butler Yeats’ earliest poems.  The subject of the poem’s title is an uninhabited island in Lough (Lake) Gill, a lake in Ireland; growing up, Yeats would often … Continue reading

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Sonnet 60

William Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, most of them published in 1609.  They are known collectively as “Shakespeare’s Sonnets.”  The most well-known of these is probably number 18, whose famous lines begin, “Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s day?”  My … Continue reading

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“anyone lived in a pretty how town”

This poem is one of E.E. Cummings’ most well-known, and for good reason.  Cummings is my favorite writer of all time; the way he takes words which have specific meanings and set places in the English language, and turns them … Continue reading

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