Noah S. Thompson

Noah S. Thompson is an Senior English and Art & Art History double major at Dickinson College with a passion for bees, gluten-free pastries, and all things queer. His work primarily focuses on portraiture and abstraction.

4 Entries

Finding the Greenman: Inside the Studio of Nicholas Kahn

Image 1

Picture 1 of 11

In early July I had the pleasure of visiting the studio of artist Nicholas Kahn. Though he has his primary studio in Hudson, Nicholas also works in his farmhouse where he has cultivated a menagerie of objects from Mexican devil figures to dead bats and taxidermies. As I am studying photography, it was a rare opportunity to see his artistic process, although for the majority of my visit Nicholas was working on a watercolor painting, another one of his mediums. Some of his other works are heavily inspired by 17th century dutch art and pagan religions ( especially the Greenman), which are prevalent in his floor to ceiling tapestries. After finishing up with his painting, which ended up being a pangolin suspended over valley and Hudson River, we headed out to a local waterfall to work on “Dreams of the Drowning World,” a portrait series by Nicholas and fellow artist Richard Selesnick.…

Continue Reading

London

9

Picture 1 of 9

Every year Dickinsonians make a journey around the globe, whether it be for a semester or year, to continue working on their liberal arts education and cultivating a better global perspective. Lead by David Strand, Professor of Political Science and East Asian Studies, a group of juniors including myself managed to navigate the thousands-year-old city of London. Departing each day from our hotel in Bloomsbury we set out on daily adventures to places like St. Paul’s Cathedral and poet John Keats’ house in Hampstead. For someone studying photography, it is difficult to resist taking photos and coming across as an obvious tourist with their lens clicking at every possible opportunity. Fortunately, my self-imposed restraint created an opportunity. Rather than taking photographs of everything I saw, I had to look with earnest, selecting only a few objects or areas.

Walking around London there is something extraordinary on almost every corner, such as an incredibly fat pigeon or a tavern from the 16th century, but when you are trying to document the city you have to think about what images work with each other.…

Continue Reading

In Memoriam: Winter 2015

Continue Reading

Love on Campus

Continue Reading