Bird flu: A Thing of the Past?

By Nick Gubitosi

This past Friday (February 26, 2010) a group of scientists led by a virologist from the University of Wisconsin published a study about a new antiviral, which was found to be highly effective against the pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus.  What stands out about this new antiviral, known as CS-8958, is that it has been proven to be effective against Tamiflu resistant strains of H5N1. This makes it a promising candidate for the future treatment and prevention of the bird flu.

Antiviral drugs are used in the treatment of viral infections by inhibiting the development of disease causing pathogens, and are a vital component in the countermeasure against human influenza viruses.  Recently many new strains have been emerging, which show resistance to Tamiflu, an antiviral that slows the spread of the influenza virus within the body.  These resistant strains pose a threat and make the development of new antivirals a pressing issue.

Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka from the University of Wisconsin and his team of scientists tested a drug created from a novel neuraminidase inhibitor on mice in order to see its effectiveness against H5N1 strains of influenza.  Neuraminidase inhibitors are a class of antiviral drugs that specifically target the influenza virus by blocking one of its proteins, therefore preventing its replication within the body.

They began their tests by giving a single dose of the CS-8958 antiviral drug nasally to mice, two hours after infection with the H5N1 influenza virus.  The results showed that the survival rates were higher in the mice given this new drug when compared to mice given a standard five day treatment with Tamiflu.  In another experiment, CS-8958 was found to be effective against highly pathogenic and Tamiflu resistant strains of H5N1, while it was also shown to protect mice against lethal H5N1 infection when it was administered seven days before infection with the virus.

With the information gained from this study, future treatment and prevention of H5N1 with this CS-8958 antiviral could be the most effective treatment to date due to its ability to eliminate newly emerging drug resistant strains in only one dose.  While future studies still need to be conducted to make sure that these results are the same when tested on humans, the potential of this new antiviral is promising and could possibly put an end to the fear of the bird flu pandemic.

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8 thoughts on “Bird flu: A Thing of the Past?”

  1. Bird flu disease was spreaded before todays swine flu disease.The researchers’ report in Nature recommends that farms use unvaccinated sentinel birds to detect the disease.Vaccination reduces the chance of birds becoming infected and reduces the amount of virus they shed and the time over which they shed it.

  2. Neuraminidase inhibitors are a class of antiviral drugs that specifically target the influenza virus by blocking one of its proteins, therefore preventing its replication within the body. unblocked games

  3. Avian influenza strains are divided into two types based on their pathogenicity: high pathogenicity (HP) or low pathogenicity. The most well-known HPAI strain, H5N1, appeared in China in 1996, and also has low pathogenic strains found in North America. unblocked games

  4. Recently many new strains have been emerging, which show resistance to Tamiflu, an antiviral that slows the spread of the influenza virus within the body. These resistant strains pose a threat and make the development of new antivirals a pressing issue. https://unblockedgames7777.weebly.com/

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