Am I a local yet?

So I have finished up my third week of my internship, and have been back in Amman for four weeks now. In the last week and a half I have noticed that my Arabic skills are growing although I am currently not studying or reviewing any material. My speaking and listening has reached a level I never thought it would without review or study. I have also reached a level of comfort here that I did not expect. Whether it is giving Jordanians directions, having complex conversations with taxi drivers, or talking with the staff at the Center over some Arabic coffee in the break room, I do not feel out of place.

At the Center I am currently enjoying my role and my tasks. My mentor, Dr. Lamees, is fantastic. She makes time to meet with me everyday to discuss how my research is going, where I stand, what are my difficulties and what she can do to help me, etc. I really enjoy being in this academic environment. I have views on the Middle East and North Africa region that are considered ‘radical’ and have not been encouraged to pursue those views, but here these views are commonplace and I have been encouraged, not only by Dr. Lamees, to pursue research on these issues. It has been very reassuring and renewed my interest in research. 

Settling In…

As I finish up my second week on the job, I am finally getting accustomed to my new routine in Amman. I have figured out where to find buses, and how to take them, something I was not able to do in the spring when I was here. Taking a bus in Amman is always a risk because they don’t operate on a schedule and can be very early or very late. In the last few years there have been grassroots efforts at trying trying to educate Jordanians on how the bus system currently operates, and well as to force the bus system to adopt a formal schedule with official stations and times. The people on my street are starting to recognize me and I have engaged in conversations with quite a few of them. All in all, Jordanians are extremely nice people and I have never felt unwelcomed here.

 

 

This week I was assignea new supervisor, Dr. Lamees ElMutahseb. Dr. Lamees specializes in movements, especially religious movements, and I have been assigned to help her research theories of modernization, how these theories have influenced modernization and development in the Middle East and North Africa, and how religion has played a role, if any, in this process. One important thing that happened this week was that I decided that enrolling in a Master’s program is most likely the right choice for me. So, you could say that this internship is helping me narrow in on my career path!

Back in Amman

I arrived in Amman last Tuesday and started my internship at the Center for Strategic Studies at the University of Jordan this past Sunday, June 24. I had the chance to study abroad this past spring in Amman where I met my internship coordinator, Dr. Sara Ababneh. Dr. Ababneh  offered me an internship at the Center for Strategic Studies in March when I was struggling to find summer internship opportunities. When I arrived at the center on Sunday I was greeted by my advusor Dr. Walid AlKhatib. Dr. AlKhatib assigned me to assist him on research about social and labor movements in Jordan. This is extremely pertinent as Jordan has just gone through weeks of protests over the income tax that the government was ready to implement. Protests are nothing new to Jordan, as Jordanians protested on and off for nearly 2 years during the Arab Spring in 2010-2012, demanding economic and political reform. So far in my first week I have compared how the Western media has covered these two different waves of protests. I like the support I am getting at the Center for Strategic Studies with my research, although Dr. Walid is my research advisor, I can go to any one of the researchers at the Center and receive tips, advice, sources, etc. I am glad what my first week has brought, and I am looking forward to the coming weeks.