Matt Flynn Traded to Oakland Raiders from Seattle Seahawks

This morning NFL sources confirmed that a deal had been between the Seattle Seahawks and and the Oakland Raiders to trade quarterback Matt Flynn to the Raiders. Matt Flynn was one of the most hyped and sought after free agents of the 2012 off-season before signing a 3 year $26 million contract with $10 million guaranteed. In return the Seahawks received a sixth-year draft pick in the 2014 draft and a conditional pick in the 2015 draft.
The Seahhawks will suffer cap wise because of this but because they only had a three year deal constructed they won’t have to eat too much of Flynn’s contract. However, this high spending for a quarterback who didn’t even end up starting a single regular season game is quite typical of the NFL. Flynn started one game in his 6 year NFL career but in that game he threw for 480 yards and 6 touchdowns breaking some of Brett Favre’s records in that game. The Seahawks took Flynn expecting him start but then went and drafted a quarterback in Russel Wilson in the first round who went on to become a starter and lead the Seahawks to the NFC Title game.
While short this article shows us that NFL teams who have money are willing to spend money on a player even if they aren’t sure whether they will be a major part of the team or sit on the sideline for 16 or more games. If the Seahhawks had kept Flynn they would of been paying someone a lot of money to sit around and do nothing for most of the season. Teams and especially owners and GM’s should sit down and look at at all the possibilities befoer signing a player, coughing up a lot of cash, and then having both go to waist. This shows that a GM isn’t always doing his job the right way.
You can read the article here: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/15298…

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2 Responses to Matt Flynn Traded to Oakland Raiders from Seattle Seahawks

  1. tiernon says:

    Justin,

    Looking at this story provokes a lot of thoughts in my own mind. The most prevalent of which is how much professional athletes are paid in the United States. In a lot of ways, it may seem unethical to use such a great amount of dollars to simply pay for one person’s salary, especially when the United States has such a constant budget issue. However, the salaries of players are possible because there is a never ending, recession proof demand for the sports market and superstars within each respective sport. It makes me wonder how different this country would be if people invested their money in new structures, education, etc. instead of watching and supporting professional sports. I do it too, 90% of the day, ESPN Sportscenter is on in my living room while I do whatever else I may have on my “TO DO” list for the day. Simply put, I think its amazing how much fiscal power sports generates to pay any individual a multi-million dollar salary in a society where most people will take years and years to even make One million dollars.

  2. millemic says:

    This article is interesting to me because I enjoy the business aspect of athletic organizations. A GM’s job is difficult because they have to consider many variables and be prepared for the unexpected. Quarterbacks are typically the face of a franchise and are the difference between a successful or unsuccessful team. Therefore, the demand for quality players at this position is extremely high, even if one is only going to be a backup. The contract only guarantees 10 million over three years which is relatively low when compared to all professional athletes. Also, professional athletics is an entertainment industry, therefore your argument can expand to actors/actress, concert performers, etc. The fiscal power of the entertainment industry will continue to dominate as long as we the consumers have a demand for their services. Great article!

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