Home Gardening and Food Security in Carlisle, Spring ’21

1 – Manual – continued

The manual is finally done (link below!)

We’d like to thank Asuncion Arnedo and Mohammad Abu Shuleh who assisted with translations of the surveys with Jenn. We’d also like to thank Krista Hanley who assisted with all the designing and printing elements.

Click here to view the Home Gardening Manual version 2020

2 – Garden Project – continued

The Kaufman “home garden” is seeing its second year!  

The objectives of the garden are same like last year. It will continue to simulate a novice person planning and designing their vegetable garden – this time for a second year. The garden will also continue to collect data on yields and to use for experimental practices (watering, container gardening, etc.). Additionally, the garden will be used to supplement and demonstrate gardening information and recommendations for our Carlisle home gardeners.  

Instead of seedling trays, we reused soda and beer cans to start our seeds.
Seedlings in the Stafford Greenhouse, Kaufman Hall.

This time, we are using all 5 beds in the garden, plus we have the opportunity to start our own seedlings for transplant. We started by brainstorming a list of crops that we are both interested in growing and eating, then started sketching plans while considering individual planting dates, maturation times, companion planting, and crop rotation.  

We started all our seedlings in the Kaufman Greenhouse. We started the collard, kale, and onion seedlings on March 19th, and my tomato, hot pepper, and eggplant seedlings on April 3rd. To make this as accessible as possible, I started my seedlings in used cans, applesauce cups, and egg cartons. Everything but those in the egg cartons germinated – presumably due to its material drawing up too much moisture from the soil. 

3 – Windowsill Project

The windowsill project was created with the intent 

to make home gardening accessible and easy! I utilize different items that would be easily accessible in my dorm room with hopes to eat from the harvested crop. The windowsill project also provides visual aid to some of the techniques used through the home gardening manual. 

 
The windowsill series was posted weekly on Wednesday and hosted by Dee. The series was  created with the intent to make home gardening accessible and easy! This series highlights Dee utilizing different items that could be easily accessible in a dorm room  or at the home of the viewer.Items found in the  household or dorm are the used to create produce.The windowsill project also provides visual aid to some of the techniques used through the home gardening manual. In total eight videos averaging at 3 minutes were made for the window series amongst the spring semester. They had a total of 3,381 views . This series displayed the process of sewing seat all the way up to using food scraps to create new food.

4 – Gardening collaborations

Through the surveys, we have established connections with several borough residents whom we are calling our home gardeners! We started preliminary conversations discussing their past gardening experiences, available garden space, their desired vegetables, concerns with time and tool availability, and opportunities to engage their families in the gardening practice. From that, Audree and Dee paired up with one home gardener each and designed several garden and crop plans for their respective home gardener.  

In Audree’s plan, she incorporated a “dye garden” and a “pizza garden” for her home gardener, supplemented with a lesson plan for each, in the hopes to get their children involved and excited in vegetable production and processing. Additionally, in response to her home gardener’s interest in herbalism, Audree designed an herb garden, accompanied by a fact sheet outlining benefits and recipes using the herbs in her herb garden.

Dee received Bethany’s plan there was little room in ground that received sun so we had to make use of the front, back and wall of the yard. Dee input her crops into her space based on the space – noting that she wanted all of her garden above ground within containers. Bethany and Dee used recycling bins, shoe storage containers , wooden palettes , and an aluminum pan with paper cups for germination. There was one day where Dee assembled the garden with Jenn and Bethany to start the rest of the crops that have not been germinated. We left Bethany with her palettes , trellising poles, and germinated seeds . She also had a personalized garden plan for seeding the crops that were not quite ready and has been waiting on the crops to harden off for transplanting outdoors. 

Each gardener also completed a biodiversity survey of their yard. the goals of the HG project is to track changes in household dietary diversity and quantities consumed but also to track changes in yard-scale biodiversity.  

Future Work

  • Two Burpee Fellows this summer, Dee Findlay will continue her position and be joined by Maeve Thistel (class of 2021 (Anthro, Italian and Food Studies).
  • Goal for summer 2021 is to have 6 borough gardeners with whom to work this year
  • Continue surveys and data collection efforts plus recruit more borough residents for 2022
  • Develop and offer live garden demonstrations with participating gardeners for neighbors to learn
  • Connect with and interview community bright spots for perspective and to help get others interested in HG work

Dee received Bethany’s plan there was little room in ground that received sun so we had to make use of the front, back and wall of the yard. Dee input her crops into her space based on the space – noting that she wanted all of her garden above ground within containers.Bethany and Dee used recycling bins, shoe storage containers , wooden palettes , and an aluminum pan with paper cups for germination.There was one day where Dee assembled the garden with Jenn and Bethany to start the rest of the crops that have not been germinated. We left Bethany with her palettes , trellising poles, and germinated seeds . She also had a personalized garden plan for seeding the crops that were not quite ready and has been waiting on the crops to harden off for transplanting outdoors. 

 

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