Entries Tagged as 'Latin Poetry Podcast'

Saturday, May 23rd, 2020

Penelope to Odysseus part 1 (Ovid, Heroides 1.1-36)

Here begins what I plan to be a series on Ovid’s Heroides, in preparation for an open online seminar on the Heroides with Chun Liu of Peking University, July 16-20, 2020. We will read and discuss several of the Heroides together. Please sign up and join us! Penelope starts by letting Odysseus know she feels […]

Sunday, December 1st, 2019

Catullus and Martial on Unguents

Catullus 13 (text: G.P. Goold, 1983, via PHI) Cenabis bene, mi Fabulle, apud me paucis, si tibi di favent, diebus, si tecum attuleris bonam atque magnam cenam, non sine candida puella et vino et sale et omnibus cachinnis.              5 haec si, inquam, attuleris, venuste noster, cenabis bene: nam tui […]

Sunday, November 24th, 2019

Seneca, Medea 895-910

Seneca’s Latin play Medea was written in the mid-first century AD. Less famous than the version of Euripides, it is nonetheless very powerful, and is generally considered to be the strongest of his earlier plays. In this scene, Medea prepares herself to kill her own children as a way of taking revenge on her faithless […]

Sunday, November 17th, 2019

J.K. Rowling and Peter Needham: Distribuens Petasus

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (1997) has a delightful Latin version, Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis (2003), by Peter Needham. Needham taught Classics at Eton for over thirty years and also translated A Bear Called Paddington into Latin. In this edition of Latin Poetry Podcast we check out his elegant version of […]

Monday, November 11th, 2019

Reynard and the Side of Bacon (Ysengrimus 1.269-288)

Ysengrimus is a Latin mock epic, an anthropomorphic series of fables written in 1148 or 1149 in Latin elegiac couplets. Its chief character is Isengrin the Wolf; the plot describes how the trickster figure Reynard the Fox overcomes Isengrin’s various schemes. This week’s Latin Poetry Podcast is a excerpt in which Isengin and Reynard collaborate […]

Monday, November 4th, 2019

Claudian on Mules (De Mulabus Gallicis)

Claudian (ca. 370-ca.404 AD) is best known for his political poetry (he was associated with the court of the Roman emperor Honorius at Milan). But his miscellaneous carmina minora include a fascinating variety of shorter poems, such as a description of a marble chariot (CM 7), a sepulchral epigram on a beautiful woman (11), an invective […]

Monday, August 19th, 2013

Rhythmic Fluency: The Dactylic Hexameter

Rhythmic Fluency – 1 In this guest podcast (first of a three-part series) Latinist and drummer Lance Piantaggini discusses the dactylic hexameter, and provides drum backing tracks (of the kind a jazz musician might use) for us to practice feeling the natural rhythms of the line. He pays special attention to the caesura, and argues […]

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Now winter’s grip loosens (Horace, Odes 1.4)

Horace Odes 1.4 Solvitur acris hiems grata vice veris et Favoni trahuntque siccas machinae carinas, ac neque iam stabulis gaudet pecus aut arator igni nec prata canis albicant pruinis. iam Cytherea choros ducit Venus imminente luna, 5 iunctaeque Nymphis Gratiae decentes alterno terram quatiunt pede, dum gravis Cyclopum Volcanus ardens visit officinas. nunc decet aut […]

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Wish to Be What You Are (Martial, Epigrams 10.47)

Guide to a happy life, from the Roman epigram writer Martial (M. Valerius Martialis). The Martialis mentioned in line 2 is L. Julius Martialis, the poet’s closest friend. My translation is below. Martial 10.47 Vitam quae faciant beatiorem, Iucundissime Martialis, haec sunt: Res non parta labore, sed relicta; Non ingratus ager, focus perennis; Lis numquam, toga […]

Friday, August 17th, 2012

Basics of Scansion 7: Elision

Explanation of the concept and practice of elision in Latin poetry, with lots of examples.