Open Mic!!

Jam Space members of “Green Tangerine” playing at Open Mic [Emilio Gurany (’25), Owen Degenhard (’25), Nate Valleau (’25), & Matt Turk (’23)] performed at Open Mic!

This past Saturday, WDCV hosted an Open Mic! There were talented acts and a really enthusiastic crowd; awesome energy all around. Thank you to all who came out and supported live, local music! Also shoutout to that one guy in the muscle tee that got everyone up and dancing (lol).

 

Allan Farfan Canales (’23) rapping his self-produced music

WDCV is all about promoting local, underrepresented music and art, Open Mic was the perfect opportunity to bring that to the community! Some of the performers shared original pieces with the audience. Musicians Zuzu Black (’25), Allan Farfan Canales (’23), and Benjamin Fox (’26) all played original songs and the crowd loved their creations! Pia Mancini (’25) also read an original poem, and her passionate reading really resonated with the audience.

Venus Bhatt (’24) and Swarnim Bade Shrestha (’26) sang “Take Me To Church” by Hozier

 

 

 

 

 

We’re in the process of getting some of our performers’ original works into our Heavy Rotation, look out for their stuff on the air! And a special thank you to our Technical Production Manager, Vivika Garrett, for setting up and managing the tech stuff for the entire event.

Benjamin Fox (’26) performed an original song

 

CMC Concert- 11/8/2022

Last night, CMC Nashville, TN. put on an awesome show! The organization is a ‘study abroad’ program that teaches students for a semester all the details of putting on a show: set up, technical production, choreography, songwriting, etc. Their final exam is going on tour around the U.S., and one of their stops this year was Dickinson!

Each performance featured a lead singer, guitarist, bassist, backup singers, keyboardist, and drummer; and some acts included trumpets and trombones. Every part of each of the dozen acts were completely original and created by the students themselves.

The concert had all different genres: punk, pop, indie, metal, rap, and others! There was something for everyone to enjoy. The students put on amazing performances and the crowd was enthusiastic throughout the show.

CMC Nashville & WDCV Exec

Carlisle Halloween Parade 2022

This past week, October 26th, WDCV walked in Carlisle’s annual Halloween parade! Our theme was Favorite Artists. How’d we do?

 

A People’s History of WDCV- ’65-’69: The Early Years

Original WDCV 640 AM Sign

Our lovely radio station was founded in 1959. The 60s, the radio’s baby years on the air, had a few hiccups with DJs being locked out and having to climb through windows to get to their show on time or the station being absolved, but we’ve persevered (Woohoo!). Our station’s original members shared their stories of dedication to the radio, where some admitted they may have become addicted to the radio (I mean, who wouldn’t be?) and others traveled to DC to report on the MLK Jr.! The “egg crate capital of the world”, as Michael Conrad ’68 calls it, holds a special place in our 60s alums’ hearts who were among the first to bring WDCV to life!

 

Thanks to all the alums who shared their stories!

Bernard Jay Adler ‘66, Alan Bronstein ‘66

Joel Korin ‘67

Steve Mortimer ‘68, Steve Myers ‘68, Michael Conrad ‘68, Tom Hoffman ‘68, Paul H. Silverman ‘68

Thomas Walters ‘69, Richard A. Kolb ‘69

 

Bernard Jay Adler ‘66 

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Played classical music and mainly read album covers relating to the composer in by best FM voice.  Occasionally I would play a Broadway show album (I went on to a thirty-three year career as a Broadway production stage manager.)”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The studio was lined with egg cartons. The equipment usually worked.  I verified an audience of one – my girlfriend – Elizabeth Lane.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Best of luck to current and future Dickinsonians who are priviledged to intone, ‘THIS IS WDCV, THE VOICE OF DICKINSON COLLEGE IN CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA!’”

WDCV Glossary of Terms

Alan Bronstein ‘66 

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started in ’63.  When the station moved out of Bosler(?) into the new HUB, I was elected as program mgr.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The big memory is the transition from an attic room with walls covered in cardboard egg crates to provide some sound deadening into a beautiful properly soundproofed studio with office and storage space in the lower level of the student union right by the spiral staircase.

I came to appreciate the homier, warmer feel of the attic location though.  It also had a more “piraty” feel to it.

I dropped out for a semester to get my head together . . . and when I came back I had to leave WDCV out of my extra-curricular activities.  Something had to go in order for me to actually graduate.  I was busy enough with Mermaid Players, being photo editor of the D’sonian, and a student rep on the Omnibus D’Arts committee.

Oh, one thing that I really appreciated was learning how all those DJs in every town seem to be buddies with all those music legends.  I used the recorded interviews we received on reel-to-reel tapes a lot.  I’m sure you still get those (downloadable at this point in time, I’m sure), the DJ is given a script with questions and the answers are by the celeb on the sound track.  We can all sound like we’re “one of the in crowd.”  I’d never seen those when I was working at WPEN in Philly during high school.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Bosler(?) on the SE corner of Louther and College.  then it moved to the HUB by the spiral stairway.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“1. I think that college radio stations can fill a slot not filled by commercial stations.  Good examples are the stations at UPenn and Temple.  Those, tho, have become less student run and more professional.

  1. It trains a group of caring college students in (a) how a business works, (b) how a radio station works, (c) augments a series of skills that are prized in the executive suite like thinking on your feet, controlling your voice and making it likable, ad-libbing, and presenting to a group (even if they are unseen).
  2. It also builds responsibility in the officers as well as the DJs . . . and further teaches the need for meeting deadlines.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I loved that part of my life and would love to do it again.  Some of that rubbed off on my favorite student, who then went on to Villanova and had her own show on their radio station.”

 

December 1, 1967- Dickinsonian Meets WDCV Next Week On Gridiron in 195th Annual Classic

Joel Korin ‘67 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Soul Joel Show  Tuesday nights 10 to midnight”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“1963-64, At the old Music Building (now a cafe).The studio was upstairs.  Egg crates served as acoustical tile.  My first year Steve Fishman and I had a  show together.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“On the air I endorsed a fraternity brother who was running for Student Senate Office. The next morning at breakfast. WDCV was playing in the dining hall,  About every 10 minutes someone from the station would come on and denounce my remarks.  

On my last show, two senior women came to the studio and danced during the whole show,  Someone also recorded my last show on a reel to reel tape.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Freshman year, 63-64 in the Music Building.  In September 64, the HUB opened and the studio moved to the basement.”

Pics of the Station ’68 (shared by Michael Conrad ’68)

Steve Mortimer ‘68

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I started in 1967 with a Friday evening slot. I played contemporary R&R and some selected oldies.  I guess I called it the Steve Mortimer show for want of a more creative name. In 1968 I got one of the coveted noon time slots.  The station was broadcast into the dining hall at that time… very cool”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Just a humble DJ”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I used to insert cartoon voices that were on a tape in the middle of some songs and probably got carried away with it. Sometimes students from the college and even from town would call in and make requests for their favorite tunes.  We had a news feed in on the hour and I never got the hang of cutting to it correctly. It was alot of fun and the music at the time was a mix of “soul” and the newer psychedelic stuff”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“The station was in the Union basement where the quick stop store is now”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“It’s VERY important as a connection with the larger music and cultural world”

Any parting thoughts?

“For a geeky kid like me, it was an opportunity to express myself and the music that I loved and still do.”

 

Pics of the Station ’68 (shared by Michael Conrad ’68)

Steve Myers ‘68

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“’64 – ’68 DJ/news announcer

’66 – ’68 Manager – station shifted from phone line broadcast repeaters  in dorms to lo-power FM”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Moving the station into HUB (what a goat rope) and during slow hours (past midnight, for example) some DJ’s would dial   an operator, say, in California and ‘build’ his/her program around chats with her”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“In 1964-65, studio was in the attic of a former fraternity house behind Althouse Science Bldg.  Moved to HUB in 1965”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Aside from obvious reasons, press freedom needs to be robust – an make government a bit afraid of it. Radio has both a technical and an arts face, making it fit nicely into a liberal arts college environment.  Good on Dson for holding on to its call letters!”

 

Michael Conrad ’68

Michael Conrad ‘68 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Initially, I did a show called “The Jazz Sound” for a couple hours on Friday nights. When the station moved into new facilities next to the student store in the HUB I continued playing “middle of the road” music several times a week. Eventually, during my last year and a half, the station went to a complete top 40 format and I became a “rock jock.”  This last experience served me well as I went on to other radio stations.”

Michael Conrad ’68

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“To my detriment, I got involved with the station shortly after arriving on campus in 1964. From late 1966 through graduation in 1968, I was chief engineer and jocked throughout the week.  As if that wasn’t enough, I also did play by play for Dickinson Basketball home and away games.  My association with the station became so extensive that it impacted my academics and I nearly flunked out.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“During my four years at Dickinson, DCV was a “carrier current” operation. That meant that an AM signal was fed into the electric cirsuitry in the dorms.  The signal was supposed to be confined to each building.  IT WASN’T!  When all the dorms were wired up, our signal was so strong that it could be heard all over town.  We didn’t care.  It actually got to the point where stores were playing us in both malls.  We loved it. Ultimately, this gross over-extension of our signal led to the station being sited by the FCC and shut down in 1969.”

Michael Conrad ’68

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Initially, the studios (or should I say studio) nicknamed the “egg crate capital of the world” were located on the top floor of a small home behind Althouse. “Egg crate” because acoustics were controlled by egg cartons glued to the walls.In 1965, the station re-located to a four room complex next to the student store in the HUB.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“For me, college radio was extremely important as a platform from which I was able to learn enough about broadcasting to launch a part-time career which I still pursue to this day.”

Any parting thoughts?

“BE CAREFUL!  Radio is addictive.  If you are not cautious, it can sink your academics which is the real reason that you (your parents) are paying all that money to be a Dickinson student.

Have fun!!”

DJ in the Station ’68 (shared by Michael Conrad ’68)

Tom Hoffman ‘68

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My first slot was on Sunday mornings.  Someone was supposed to unlock the building so I could get in.  If they didn’t do that, you had to climb up on the roof and get into the “studio” through an unlocked window.  That got trickier in the winter.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Well, it was important to me. In fact, in was indirectly responsible for my career in the energy industry.”

Pics of the Station ’68 (shared by Michael Conrad ’68)

Paul H. Silverman ‘68

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“1. In the beginning we broadcast from the second floor of the old music house. It was in the shape of a castle turret, low ceiling, tight fit, one room, called the “Egg crate capitol” of D’son because the ceiling and walls were covered with throw away egg-crates that were our version of sound baffles to quiet the room. It was a one man operation. The DJ did the sound check, Qued the record, and worked the per-recorded adverts and public announcement. That was pioneering. When we move to the newly built Holland Union, ground level, it was a new era. The DJ and the sound technician in two rooms with glass partition. 

  1. I was personally at and reported on the wake of Martin Luther King in Moorehouse College, Atlanta GA as well as the day of and after the shooting. 
  2. I interviewed David Susskind, Peter Jennings, Newton Minow, and Dick Gregory each a speaker at D’son invited by me as Chair of D’son speakers committee.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“The second floor of the music building which just a bare stone faced house with a second floor in the shape of a round turret. When completed, moved to lower level Holland Union which was considered spacious and state of the art audo broadcasting for our size college.”

Any parting thoughts?

“My radio show certainly was a plus to my personal growth. The show called upon me to take responsibility for every word I spoke, to control my time, to enlarge my vocabulary, to learn how to project my voice, to work with others.”

November 14, 1969- WDCV Absolved

Thomas Walters ‘69

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I held many slots over my four years. As program director if somebody couldn’t do their show I had to either find a replacement or do the show myself. My favorite time was 8PM to 10PM however.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Disc Jockey 1965-66

Executive Board 1966-69

Program Director part of 1966-67

Program Director 1967-68

Program Director 1968-69”

March 7th, 1969- Martha and the Vandellas to Play in Holland Union Building

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The 1969 Micrcosm suggests that I graduated with a degree in economics, but in reality I spent more time at WDCV in my four years than I did with my major, so I always felt that I majored in radio and minored in economics.  I did go on to law school and have been practicing law for about forty years now, but my experience in managing the radio station in those years was an invaluable experiece that I could never duplicate. The years 1965-69 were an incredible time to be a college student and had to be four of the most turbulent years for our nation and it was equally significant for the growth of the radio station. Prior to 1966 it was difficult to muster enough people to participate in the station but by 1969 there were was a waiting list. This was in large part due to the relocation to the HUB coupled with a group of students who truly wanted to see the radio station become a successful part of the campus community. During that period we added hourly newscasts with both national and local news, added “wire services” for more news, started broadcasting home and away games for both football and basketball, and added a “record” subscription service from the major record companies for promoting all of the popular music. We patterned our operation after other “Top 40” radio stations from Philadelphia and New York that were popular at the time and later added “progressive rock” shows as musical tastes changed. I’ve got alot of memories about my involvement at the station including the death of MLK, the allnight broadcast of the 1968 elections, and some of our failed attempts to cover live student demonstrations and some sporting events but this may be more information than you really need.  Thanks for reaching out to me on this and if I can be of any help let me know.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“The station moved to the HUB in early 1966.  Prior to that it was located across the street in the old religion building.”

 

March 13th, 1969- Focht To Give WDCV Countdown: ETV Prepares for ‘Trivia Program’

Richard A. Kolb ‘69

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Started out on Sat nights with “Easy Lsitening” but later the station went to Top 40 format – did several shows a week at different times”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ at first, then News Director and finally Station Manager in 1968-69.  Also did Basketball play-by-play for a time”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Probably the most memorable events occurred in 1968 – the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Presidential election that year.  We did all night coverage of election results with the aid of UPI service (now long defunct).  My most interesting experience personally was a trip made to Washington DC after the King assassination when there were riots in the Nation’s Capital.  I went with Scott Geare, who was then News Director, and we managed to get into the city despite a military quarantine and were even able to attend a press conference held by Cyrus Vance who was appointed by the White House to oversee the restoration of peace and reforms after the assassination.  Quite a time when the city was essentially under marshal law.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“In the basement of the HUB – there were 2 small studios and a work area.  One was used for AM broadcasts and the other for the very beginnings of an FM station.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“It is a great outlet for learning about the broadcast/media industry.  It also provides a source of entertainment for the college community and, I presume, beyond Dickinson itself.”

Do you have any WDCV memorabilia hidden away that you might want to share with us?  Please tell us what you think you may have and we will find a way to get a copy to us.

“I have old tapes (cassettes) of our trip to Washington, DC and the broadcast we did of the King memorial held at the college.”

WDCV Open Mic

Looking to hear some awesome live performances right here at Dickinson? WDCV is hosting an Open Mic! Join us in the first floor of Outhouse (60 Mooreland Ave, across the street from Allison Hall) November 12th from 7-9pm.

There will be live music performances, poetry readings, and more. Come out and watch, or if you want to perform check out the link below or the QR code above!

Sign up to perform here!

A People’s History of WDCV ’10-’19: The Underground Headquarters

WDCV’s 50th Anniversary in 2012

Our most recent alums shared their experiences in the station during the 2010s. With new equipment rolling into the station and the radio starting to broadcast online, our community continued to grow off-campus. Our neighbors, out-of-town family members of DJs, and past alums still tune into the station from wherever they are now!

 

Thanks to all the alums who shared their stories. Interested in sharing yours? Add to the People’s History of WDCV!

Javan Howard ’10

Jimmy Wilkinson ‘11, Patrick “Skip” Stevenson ‘11

Stephen Whittaker ‘13

Ben Breuninger ‘14

Lauren Bobyock ‘17

Manny ‘18

Flyer from 2009/2010ish

Javan Howard ‘10

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Charmz in Effect 10pm-12am”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“On air DJ Fall 2005, Hip Hop Music Director 06-10, & Station Manager 2008”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“WDCV Station retreats were always awesome, CMJ in NY was also something all execs should experience. Live on Britton Plaza, I love those events.”

 

Jimmy Wilkinson ‘11

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Originally it was “Tears of Rage”, then I hosted with James Riley and it was called “Not Top 40 Enough”. I then did “Tears of Rage” as a community DJ and lastly combine with Chris Bratton to do “Tears of a Cactus”.” 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Too many!

I renamed my show not too 40 enough because when James and I were doing some event on Britton plaza a kid asked us if we had any top 40 music because he didn’t recognize anything we were playing.

I think Chris Bratton had us do a pie-eating competition once?

I DJ’d when families were arriving during move-in weekend and that was always a good time.

I remember hearing so much bluegrass on WDCV when I first got to Dickinson courtesy of Davis Tracy. I now really enjoy bluegrass and even picked up the mandolin thanks to some of that inspiration!

My good friend Miles Nelson did an entire science fiction space opera over the radio. It was a multi-part series. It was called Jack Sparks. I played some German scientist. We did the final episode live over the air and it was awesome to have the whole gang there!

The manatee John Lithgow PSA changed my life. Chris Bratton even bought the book for my son last year thanks to its influence.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“YES! So important. By the way I run the coffeehouse music program at Carlisle high school and think it would be super fun to get those kids to the station to check it out sometime…”

Any parting thoughts?

“I still have a WDCV bumper sticker on my front desk in Carlisle High School!” 

 

Patrick “Skip” Stevenson ‘11

March 26th, 2012- Equipment in the Studio

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Live and Unabridged with Keith Rodgers (3-5 Fridays?)” 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I was a co-founder of the 50 Hours for Autism Marathon to benefit the Doug Flutie Jr foundation with Keith Rodgers.  Doug visited with us when he received his honorary doctorate from Dickinson”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes, a student-led station is a key part of the college community and can serve it for entertainment and service purposes all while giving students valuable experience at planning, performing, and public speaking.  Being a radio host along with opportunities from Professor Sloat, who formed the Center for Public Speaking, afforded students like me tremendous opportunities to hone one of the most valuable life skills you can build:  communicate ideas effectively in front of a live audience.”

Do you have any WDCV memorabilia hidden away that you might want to share with us?  Please tell us what you think you may have and we will find a way to get a copy to us.

“I still have my Doug Flutie Jr Foundation t-shirt”

Any parting thoughts?

“At the time (2000-01), internet broadcasts of WDCV were just coming onboard and it provided an opportunity for my father to listen to our basketball games when he couldn’t drive out to see the team in action. The evolution of webcasts for WDCV and small college athletics has been huge for family and alumni to stay connected. 

I am married to Kristie Stevenson (Siracuse) ’01 who now teaches physics and calculus after 17 years in the cancer field as a medical physicist.  After 5 years on active duty in the service, I have been in the business world for the last 14 years and I am currently the VP of Information Systems at Keystone Automotive Operations (LKQ).  However, the only titles I care about are Husband, DAD, and Coach.  Kristie and I have two wonderful sons, CJ (11) and Paul (16).  Who knows- maybe they will be Red Devils one day?”

 

Flyer from 2009/2010ish

Stephen Whittaker ‘13

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Long Nights on the Road – and it bounced around a bit, but was ultimately 4-6pm on Thursdays I think? Conceptually, it was a music show, but I radically changed genres every 3-4 songs (simulating driving down the highway late at night and having to keep jumping stations).”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Well, I actually started DJing in high school (we had a limited power station), but I joined WDCV as a first semester freshman in 2009. Served on the Exec Board 2012-13.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My fondest memory would probably be from senior year. I was hosting my weekly show and going through a particularly eclectic run of music. Got a call to the booth phone from Davis Tracy — a station legend — who told me he had been regularly listening to my broadcasts and wanted to let me know I’d been doing a ‘helluva job. Made my month.”

Who was the WDCV advisor at that time?

“Brenda Landis – think she’s still got the gig!” 

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“It’s hugely important. There aren’t a lot of mediums left for creating live content in a structured, (semi) professional environment in the media landscape. We’ve moved onto vlogging, short video production and podcasting — all of which are vital in their own way — but radio is what got us to them all and we still have a lot to learn from it. For me, it was not only a creative outlet as a music lover and audiophile, but an opportunity to hone important comms and public speaking skills at my own pace. College radio offers students a rare learning environment in which they set their own agenda and learn management skills in a truly organic way.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I don’t tune in as often as I once did and will hope to do so more often (online from NYC). Hope it’s still an eclectic group leading the charge day to day — keeps things fresh and interesting that way.”

 

March 27th, 2012- New Equipment in the Studio

Ben Breuninger ‘14

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“”Oh Hi Mark,” a two-hour showcase of eclectic nuggets that aired on various weekday evenings, usually around 8 or 9”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I bumbled along to WDCV during pre-orientation and was greeted by James Riley and Jimmy Wilkinson, whose beard and The Band t-shirt (respectively) made me feel immediately at home. I signed up to do a show right away and petitioned to join the exec board immediately as well, which I think took the other board members aback slightly — normally there was a “who’s interested” round up in the spring semester, but I had somehow managed to find the application on the station’s website in, like, October. I had just broken up with my high school girlfriend (who also went to Dickinson, at least initially) and was all kinds of depressed, so I needed something to sink my energy into.

I remained on the exec board throughout my time at Dickinson (minus a year abroad at UEA) and became co-station manager with Dan Plekhov in 2013-14. We were at the helm when Taylor was hired and when they tore down the Depot. I also remember the exec board meeting when WDCV’s Instagram page was launched — Indira Chakravarti was sitting across the table and said “we should make an Instagram profile,” and by the end of the meeting she said “Okay, I created an Instagram profile.””

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I remember that for my very first show, I couldn’t get my iPod (lol) to play the first track on my playlist, so James Riley (again) reached for the heavy rotation pile and played Belle and Sebastian’s “I Didn’t See It Coming,” which was fitting.

I remember a very tumultuous series of events during the fall of my sophomore year that involved a large number of people hanging around the station unnecessarily, a guitar being played live on the air, and a Jones Soda bottle being mistaken for a beer. This turned into a weeks-long scuffle involving most of the exec board and some disgruntled DJs and their friends.

I remember many a Live on Britton Plaza during which we’d try to give away free CDs, which obviously never worked.

I remember dealing with some sort of microphone issue during orientation one year, and when I managed to get it working I opted to inform the other exec board members (who were in the lounge listening on a boombox) by going live and speaking the words “It’s fucking working” into the mic. A few minutes later a concerned citizen called to inform us that someone had sworn on the air, and I pretended to not know what they were talking about.

I remember being delighted to discover that the station’s vinyl copy of Dizzy Gillespie’s “Digital at Montreux 1980” included a brief song called “Get That Booty.””

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“I kept my love of radio long past WDCV, and began volunteering at CJAM-FM in Windsor, ON when I moved to Detroit after graduating. Now that I live in Cincinnati I’m trying to figure out what station I can con into giving me airtime.

But needless to say, campus/community radio is very important to me, and I’ll go on record as saying that it’s a vital (if somewhat old-school) service in a fragmented media world. Everything about campus/community radio is analog, hands-on, grassroots, and meaningful; the people who do it do it because they have something to share, say, or play; the people who listen are invested and passionate about the connections that radio can make.

Nowhere else on the dial are you going to find people playing city pop or yacht rock or niche metal or pre-Tosh reggae or ambient drone just for the absolute hell of it. That’s because you wouldn’t be *allowed* to do that anywhere else on the dial. It’s a beautiful, valuable slice of space that’s reserved for humans to do fun, weird human shit for other humans who will appreciate it. The stereotypes about shows airing at 3 am or DJs being unintelligible or a total lack of actual listening audience are all, in fact, pretty spot-on, but they’re a feature, not a bug. On college radio you don’t have to “break through” the Spotify algo to get your very own playlist in front of people. On college radio you don’t have to convince people that your taste is good, or relevant, or important, or well-researched, or humane — you just get on the mic and go for it anyway. On college radio you have the freedom to do your thing.”

 

Lauren Bobyock ‘17

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

Flyer from 2009/2010ish

“The Smorgasbord at 10pm on Wednesdays”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“So many fun memories going to see live music with the exec board and hosting bands sponsored by WDCV! And many fun collaborations with the Trellis and Arts Collective (is the Beaux Arts Ball still a thing?!) We always had the best time djing for campus events and connecting with other groups on campus. Plus we loved starting the 24hr live event and the Pop-Up Record shop (Dennis is amazing!!)”

Who was the WDCV advisor at that time?

“Brenda and Taylor! They are the BEST!!”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“College radio is so valuable! It personally helped me gain confidence and leadership skills. It’s also so important to give people an outlet to share thoughts and music, and WDCV specifically is a great way to bridge the gap between Dickinson students and Carlisle residents who also host shows! Music brings people together!”

Any parting thoughts?

“It’s been too long since I visited (I can’t wait for the 60th Anniversary!), and I still frequently think about WDCV and the wonderful friendships and leadership skills I gained from my years there. I focused more on the radio than on my classes some weeks! I hope the station has continued to provide joy, great music, and a safe space for students as it did for me. Thank you to all of you for your hard work at keeping WDCV amazing!”

 

Manny ‘18

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“DJ Manny Fresco”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I used to promote my campus parties on air for all my Dickinson party people. My parties used to bring everyone out. By my junior year, I couldn’t post flyer of my events because Dickinson Police would crack my events down. My advertisements during my live WDCV shows would be the plug.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Very much so. I’ve been a DJ since I was 15 and it’s weird when people call themselves DJs just because they have a radio show. BUT, it’s a good foot in the door. I think the platform is a special place to reach people that you otherwise couldn’t reach.”

Do you have any WDCV memorabilia hidden away that you might want to share with us?  Please tell us what you think you may have and we will find a way to get a copy to us.

“I wish I did. I actually still have the Pioneer DJ controller I used during WDCV shows.”

 

A People’s History of WDCV ’75-’79: A Guide to Music

April 16th 1976: Guide to Music

Some others of our 70s alums shared their memories of being on air. They talked about the friendships that were created and lasted with other DJs! We hope the station still has this welcoming and fun community atmosphere today 🙂

 

Thanks to all the alums for sharing their stories! Want to share yours? Add to the People’s History of WDCV.

Gil Negrete ‘75, Lisa Rossbacher ‘75

Bill Zapcic ’77, Debby Batchelder Seme ‘77

Michael Kaye ‘78, Gary Davis ‘78, David Wolf ‘78

Andy Hermann ‘79, Ed Gregorowicz ‘79, Andrew Kaplan ‘79

Gil Negrete ‘75

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Soft Parade  ; Sundays 8 pm-12 am”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Started DJing in the fall of 1973 when I first transferred to Dickinson”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“‘This is WDCV-FM, 88.3 , in Carlisle. You’re listening to The Soft Parade and I’m Gil. Tell a friend.’ That was my intro spoken over the Dave Mason track “Side Tracked.” I ended each show with “All My Loving” by The Beatles.”

Lisa Rossbacher ‘75

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“My show was on a weekday afternoon — 4-6 p.m.  The scheduling must have been challenging, because I was a geology major and had labs almost every afternoon.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I probably started my freshman or sophomore year as a DJ.  I also served as news editor for a while.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I still remember taping some of the ads:  “Shirts!  That’s the word at Carlisle Cleaners!”

One of the albums that was released during the time I worked at WDCV was Henry Gross’s eponymous album (“Henry Gross”) in 1972.  I used to play one of the cuts (“Morning Star”) frequently during my show.  I recently located Henry, told him how much I had liked that song, and asked how to get a copy.  He graciously sent me the .mp3 file of the song — and I’m delighted to be in contact with him.”

Bill Zapcic ’77

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Morning Show, MTWF, 6 to 10 a.m.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I was on the air the night the original FM transmitter — in Bosler attic — melted down and went off the air.”

March 22nd, 1977: WDCV Executive Staff Meeting

 

Debby Batchelder Seme ‘77

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was only a DJ the second semester of my freshman year.  A law was passed requiring all DJs to get certification/licensing and I just never found the time to get it, so I gave it up.” 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I just remember the fun of being able to create what we now would call a “playlist” and an upperclassman telling me how much she enjoyed what I played.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Absolutely – it’s essential that local radio stations continue to exist, especially college stations. Local news has taken a hit in recent years with many local papers going out of business and communities have lost a precious resource of local news and information as a result.”

Michael Kaye ‘78

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Mostly Jazz – usually Friday early evenings (as far as I remember)”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I met a lot of upper class students who became good friends through doing my radio show on Friday evening.  One of them stopped by the station one Friday evening and said he liked the music I was playing and invited me to come to their dorm floor later that evening when my show as over.  We did that and developed a big group of friends as a result. One of the benefits to doing a radio show is we got early exposure to all sorts of new music when albums were released and the station got promo copies.  It was a great way to discover new music and bands.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“One of the best advantages is college radio is commercial free and plays all sorts of music, including new releases, before they might be available to the public.”

“It’s Uneraseable Sound!”- Mid 70’s Poster

Gary Davis ‘78

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Babbling Bob and Laughing Gary (on at various times)”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started out as a news reader. I eventually became a DJ.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes. It provides great experiences to develop your speaking skills, and it’s enjoyable. My first job after Dickinson was working as a reporter/newscaster in local radio.”

 

David Wolf ‘78

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Greensleeves-Howler Codpiece Hour – Sunday nights at 10 p.m.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I joined the station in 1974, my freshman year. I started as a DJ and then became Music Director.  I was there at the beginning of British New Wave and Springsteen (who performed in the cafeteria in 1975?).   Amazing show. I then started a comedy show with my great friend and brother from Theta Chi, David High.  There’s a poster of the two of us in your hallway on a cloudy day when we did an outdoor DJ session!   Awesome photo!! Dave High and I continued to be friends after graduation in 1978, and he moved to Philadelphia to be my roommate.  Unfortunately, he passed away about 10 years ago. I have great memories of the station and still have some duplicate station LPs in my collection. The benefit of being Music Director.”

Rich Kaminsky (’79) and Andy Kaplan (’79) spinning discs outdoors during a 6-hour Beatles Marathon for Spring Fling Weekend 1979 [Submitted by Margo Kaminsky (’79)]

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The Greensleeves-Howler (my name is Wolf, get it?) Comedy Hour started with a ridiculous theme song where I would play jaw harp.  We did self-written skits and played a lot of Monty Python records. I can’t say that we were any good, but we had a lot of fun, and got a lot of groans from our college girlfriends.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes indeed.  My son also became a DJ at Muhlenberg.   He loved it as much as I did.  Community radio is very important to deal with local issues, provide local news, and give the students and community a very local voice.”

 

Andy Hermann ‘79 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had several shows during several evening and late night time slots during my years at Dickinson from 1975 – 1979.  Some were jazz shows, some were rock/folk/jazz/progressive shows.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Besides being a DJ during all four of my years at Dickinson, I was Music Director during my junior and senior years and part of the leadership of the station.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The only negative memories are of trying to get all of the time slots filled each week by student djs.  Otherwise, everything was pretty cool, especially having the opportunity to listen to new music as it came into the station from record company promotional departments (and playing the good stuff during shows), and also having the opportunity to learn about and appreciate all kinds of different music from all the records albums we had stored on our shelves.

I tried to encourage all of our djs to review new albums on 3 x 5 cards and tape them to the album covers for the benefit of other djs.”

 

Ed Gregorowicz ‘79

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had a show that aired from 10 PM until 2 AM without a regular name.  Each night at midnite I would play and review a new album.  After midnite, I played mostly soft rock like Eagles, JD Souther, Poco, Pure Prairie League, Jimmy Buffett, Billy Joel, Al Stewart, America, etc.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was on WDCV all of my 4 years at Dickinson.  In addition to my radio show, I was also the Sports Director, and I did the broadcast of away basketball and football games.  We would travel on the team bus and set up in the press box or location via a phone hook-up.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Spinning LP’s was a fun experience, and my hours in the WDCV studio were among my best times at Dickinson.  I can remember putting on a long song and going over to the laundry room, which was on the same level of the HUB, to do my laundry during the late hours of my show.  I also remember an interview I did over the air with Dickinson’s ling time football coach Wilber “Goby” Gobrecht.  I wish that I had tapes from some of the old shows and interviews.  Two of my most vivid memories are when WDCV sponsored the concert at Dickinson that was headlined by Roger McGuinn of the Birds with an unknown warm-up act named Jimmy Buffett, who I got to meet.   I recall that Jimmy stole the show that evening.  Also, as Sports Director I got press passes to attend the annual the Philadelphia Phillies winter caravans where I met and interviewed many Philadelphia Phillies players for WDCV.”

 

October 24th, 1975- WDCV to Expand Broadcast Schedule

Andrew Kaplan ‘79

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had a radio show for 4 years at WDCV. I can not remember if it had a name, but we did introduce a lot of new music and played favorites for the Dickinson Community.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started DJing and Sportscasting in my first semester freshman year.  Over the 4 year period, I broadcasted Dickinson Football and Basketball games including the first Women’s BB game to be aired. We also had sports trivia show. 

I also used my experience at WDCV to became an intern at WNBC Radio at 30 Rock in NYC.  I worked there for two summers including one for my boss Bob Pittman who went on to be one of the leaders in the entertainment industry.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Some of the stories of WDCV which could be longer:

Broadcast the first women’s varsity BB game. 

Was at the station after a morning class called Nuclear Energy Friend or Foe,  when the newswire story about the emergency of 3 mile Island came over and alerted my physics professor teaching the class who then alerted the college staff. 

Was at Johns Hopkins broadcasting the football game, when I fight broke out with about 2 minutes left in the game. Punches were flying so I turned into a boxing/fight broadcaster…then the refs ended the game without playing the final minutes.”

A People’s History of WDCV ‘90-’99- The American Pickers of Music

WDCV has always been a hub to find the best new music to add to your library. Our alumni from the 90s shared with us their experiences digging through new music and sharing with each other and the community their favorite artists (and turns out we were pretty popular with the local prison too).

 

Thanks to all the alums who shared their stories. Interested in sharing yours? Add to the People’s History of WDCV!

Georgia Spiliotes Zaiser ‘90, Laurel Ryan ’90

Anne Flounders ‘91, Christopher M. Downing ‘91

Brian Joseph Markovitz ‘93

Martin Molloy ‘94, Jeanette Engert ‘94, Johannah Lipscher ‘94

Allison (Lowry) Evans ‘96, Lee Shapley ‘96, Ben Radlinski ‘96

Chris Maier ‘99, Jake Limbert ‘99

New Voices Article 1994

Georgia Spiliotes Zaiser ‘90

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

Show Flyers from Pete Bilderback ’91

“I did two different times–morning and then Saturday evenings”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started working at DCV my freshman year. Joe Watson was the big DJ force and helped make it such a fun experience.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“YES! So much fun for the students and the local community. I learned a ton and actually worked at a rock station after graduation.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Thanks for keeping this going! So much fun!”

 

Laurel Ryan ‘90

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had shows every semester from 2nd semester freshman year on.  The time slots varied widely.  My apprenticeship was Sunday Mornings 8 am, I did a few day time slots, I had a couple of 11 pm to 1 am shows which I really enjoyed.  I just played the music, so to speak.  I liked to play the newest things in the Heavy rotation bin, and the best stuff I could find in big room of albums behind the studio.  It was still mostly vinyl from ’87- ’90.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started DJ ing Freshman year, apprenticing for a friend’s boyfriend. I was strictly a DJ, and love every minute.  Mostly.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My last Semester, Spring 1990, I took on an alias name because a D-son Law Student had followed my 11 pm to 1 am show a little too closely- I wasn’t thrilled when he actually tracked me down one day.  That same semester, a freshman from my home town asked if he could apprentice with me- I said sure! Then his roommate also wanted to apprentice.  my show was 10 am- noon, and it was no big deal to have them each work with me for one hour.  Then they had two friends from their dorm floor who also wanted to get on the radio… yikes!  That, together with taking an alias, led to my first/only sort of named show, “Julie and the Boys”.  Three of us in the studio at any given time was close quarters, but I have to admit, they were some of the best times I had at Dickinson.  Thanks, Boys!”

 

Anne Flounders ‘91

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had a few time slots. First was 6 am on Tuesdays; later I did Friday and/or Saturday nights, and filled in whenever there was an opening.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My WDCV memories are among my happiest from my Dickinson years! It was really a home base for me. I spent a lot of time either on the air, in the office, or making mixtapes (yes, mixtapes) in the back studio. We put on some great concerts while I was there too. One of them featured Roger Manning and King Missile. After the concert, the WDCV staff got a private concert in the ATS basement with Roger Manning and John S. Hall, who had a side act they called The Hat Brothers. Earlier that night I’d somehow been assigned to make dinner for the bands; I had no idea how to cook so I ended up throwing in many handfuls of hot peppers. Oops.”

WDCV Logo 1991

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Well, I’m very glad to know Dickinson supports WDCV and cares about college radio, because they absolutely did not when I was a student. They wouldn’t even play WDCV in the HUB. We had to go before the Student Senate to defend our mission, because a lot of students wanted us to just play top 40. I still think it’s important for all the same reasons it was important in 1988-1991: It’s a platform for music people might not otherwise hear, and it provides an amazing experience, community, and education for the students involved.”

Any parting thoughts?

“This is all making me feel very old. 🙂 Thank you for all you’re doing!”

 

Christopher M. Downing ‘91

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had several during different years: Morning Hip Hop (630-830 am Tuesdays Sophomore year); Afternoon Classic Rock (2-4 Thursdays Junior year); Post Quad Slow Jams (130am until ? usually 2-230 or whenever I chose to close the station down – I also had call-ins throughout the show for requests and to send out messages) Senior year.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started freshamn year as an ‘intern’ learning my way around the studio – Mike Kamali ran the show then and this was right around the time that NWA, 2 Live Crew, Public Enemy, etc. were getting big so we were pretty avant garde then since we played all that stuff and almost no one else in the Carlisle/Harrisburg area was. When I got my first full-time show, Sophomore year, I actually had to bring my own CD player to the station and hook it up with the jacks from one of the turntables so I could play CDs – they were just starting to hit in 88-89 so the station only had a few.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“WDCV gave me my entre into music, something I continue to do – I took my radio DJing and parlayed that into a part-time job after I graduated: weddings, anniversary parties, etc. and I continue to provide services today – mainly as a commuinity service for non-profit organizations when they do fundraisers, etc.   WDCV is a great organization and I am so happy that it is doing well.  I even tune in on-line every once in a while.

As far as funny stories go, my very first day DJing – before I had my own show – I had to fill-in for a friend and as I was setting up, I was playing my first record the people who were cleaning out their items hit the arm of the record player that was broadcasting and skipped it noisily across the turntable – I immediately jumped on the mike and – a la Orson Wells – acted as if the station was being stormed by aliens, while simultaneous re-cuing the song.  It was not an auspicious start but it was a great story.

The other funny story occurred Junior year during my Classic Rock show – WDCV can be heard in the local jails and prison and I received, no joke, a request fro a song for an inmate – the very next song I played went out to AXE in Cell Block E – primarily because I feared that if I didn’t play the song, AXE might get out and live up to his name with me as the victim.”

 

Brian Joseph Markovitz ‘93

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“DJ Jib – 12-2 Fridays”

October 22nd 1992- WDCV is back! Did it ever leave?

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“It was a great place to get underground, alternative, and indie music.  I hope it still is.  I used to get a decent amount of requests from the prisoners and guards at the local prison to play metal and gangsta rap, and I would do it.  Still makes me laugh that my show was popular with the prison.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes.  It’s a great place for free expression for students.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Keep the station going and please play current underground or alternative music from minor labels.  That is (or at least was) the whole point of college radio.”

 

Martin Molloy ‘94

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When I started the station was still where the convenience store is and we didn’t have cd players. Also someone on redbubble is printing 90s era wdcv t shirts”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Both next to the book store and then by the computer lab down the back hall”

February 2nd 1992- DJ Meeting Poster

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Totally. It was a great experience for me as a student and exposed me to difference people and music.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I miss wdcv!”

 

Jeanette Engert ‘94

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“One semester it was “J & B Alternative.” With my roommate, Becca during Common Hour, Weds at noon. After I became an exec, my slot was much better – 8pm tuesday or something like that.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“My very first show was a 3 hour music show during finals week, when anyone could sign up for a slot before we went off the air for break.  I didn’t want to speak on the air much then, but eventually I realized that a 3 hour show is a lot of music to find! I think my first regular show was 1st semester sophomore year (1991). I became “promotions director” which I hated. Jr year we impeached the Station Manager (he wanted to make it into a classic rock station somehow!) , and I took over as SM/GM. I did half a term, 2nd semester sr year, because I was graduating, but the term starts spring semester.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“There was a sticker up in the old studio that said “DJs do it on request.” We moved to the new studio, but the budget/ administration would not give us funds to fill the large studio room with any equipment. They would also not allow us to use the room for anything including meetings, so aside from a few boxes, the room sat empty and locked most of the time. A day or two before graduation we may have had a small party in there. 

As a “campus leader,” I got invited to luncheon with  ALF: A. Lee Fritschler, the President. I was one of the first to use the email (vax account, as it was called then).”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“When I first came to Dson, it was next to the bookstore, where the Devil’s Den (is it still called that?) convenience store is now in the HUB basement. It was grungy and weirdly painted and filled with graffiti. It was great. Then in 91 or 92 it was moved to its current location, which we called the bowels of the HUB. It was very clean and new.”

 

Johannah Lipscher ‘94

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Hogtied & Proud- I don’t remember the slot”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started my frosh year as a “Newsie”- recording the news carts.  Soph- senior year I DJ’d with my friend, John.  We had a strange mix of alt-rock, folk and Prince….. we played a lot of Prince.  Oh, and Shawn Colvin– this was the start of  that alt-country-folk-pop movement.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When we used to play KrisKros’s “Jump”- we would put our pants on backwards and jump around the studio.  Also, I had a few Carlisle fans who would call into the show to try to win dates…

I have a few of the shows recorded on cassette– if I can find them, I’ll send you a copy.”

 

Allison (Lowry) Evans ‘96

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

Poster circa ’95/’96

“Mad Dog Show – very early or very late….”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Loved it. Really appreciated knowing what the heavy rotation hits were. I actually had a fan who recorded my show and said how much it meant to him. Found out that he was a resident at the Carlisle prison… but glad someone was listening!!”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Absolutely- great for college radios to have a “voice” and their role in sharing music with their listeners.”

 

Lee Shapley ‘96

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started as a freshman, one of the few 1st semester freshman fortunate enough to get a show.  I was on the exec board my sophomore year, I think in charge of promotions.  My junior I was the music director.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When I had my first show as a freshman, I was taking a drawing class with Professor Wade Davenny, who was a new professor that year.  I found out during class that he was a fan of my show, independent of me talking about WDCV, and was listening in before I went to his class!

Oh yeah, and there was the huge on-campus Peace Festival we co-sponsored with the “Peace Action” club.  We had 8 indie bands playing for free on campus plus the Dead Milkmen.  Punks drove in from across the tristate area because of our flier campaign.  The campus sure looked different that day!”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“It had just moved into its current location next to the dance studio.  I was actually heavily involved in the dance theatre group, so it was a convenient location for me!”

 

Poster circa ’95/’96

Ben Radlinski ‘96

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Coffee and Donuts, 7am-10am. Assorted other shows in the afternoons.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I may have graduated with some mic stands…sorry.

Trying to come up with ways to stop people from stealing music and failing every time.

Learning that our biggest listener base was in the Cumberland County Jail.

Getting nothing but Metallica requests from the inmates.

Getting lots of good bands to play shows around campus (with most of the work done by Lesley Barnett), like The Dismemberment Plan, Tuscadero, Smart Went Crazy.

Not having enough Phish to play for the Student Body.

Recording our own PSAs on carts…do they still have a cart machine?”

 

Chris Maier ‘99

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Don’t recall the name, but hosted it (often along with my two dorm mates) on Saturday evenings.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ’d at WDCV freshman year. Had been a DJ and board operator at a local radio station where I grew up from 16 years old through sophomore year at Dickinson (working holidays and breaks).”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Not quite a story, but what I really loved about the radio show was not only the chance to share great music in a college radio setting (nothing beats college radio), but also the chance to really connect with my dorm mates in a fun and substantial way. I will say that I don’t know how big our audience was. To wit: We decided we’d start having trivia competitions for, say, a free yo-yo or something else small and fun. But nobody was calling in to answer the questions. So we finally just started saying: All you have to do is call in; no answers required. Just call in and you’ll get free stuff! We still never got a call 🤷🏻‍♂️”

August 29th 1997- WDCV on the comeback trail

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes. It’s authentic, independent, and intros people to all sorts of music (and commentary) they may not otherwise discover.”

Jake Limbert ‘99

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Margaret Thatcher and Her Merry Band of Gimps (Evenings)”

Live from the WDCV Studio! (Patrick Herward circa ’99)

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes – Very important!  I was exposed to so many different types of music and we had such a fun time taking requests and developing specific shows.”

Any parting thoughts?

“WDCV is vitally important.  Next time I am on Campus, I will come by to say hello.  THANK YOU FOR KEEPING IT GOING!”

 

A People’s History of WDCV ‘80-’89- What’s So Special About The Radio?

Show Schedule from Spring 1980

It is more important now than ever to preserve creative outlets for freedom of expression! Commercialization of the music industry has stripped artists and the community of this expressive experience, with college radio being free of sponsors and contractual obligations, it protects a true creative community. Our WDCV alums shared with us some of their stories of experimenting artistically on the air and how they cherish their time working with the radio! 

 

Thanks to all the alums from the 80s for sharing their stories!

WDCV T-Shirt from 1980 (Thanks Helen Loidl ’80!)

David Dixon’ 80, Tom Hamill ‘80, Laurel Dickson-Bull ‘80 

Frances Fernandez ‘81, Andrew Hyde ’81, Elizabeth G. (Betsy Gill) Walters ‘81, Barb Freda ’81

Bill Epperly ‘83, John Philip ’83, Greg Zimmerman ‘83, David Alterman ‘83, Stu Fischer (with a “C”) ‘83

Roderic Flowers ‘84, Lori Pellnitz ‘84, Laurie Bacon ’84, John Basso ‘84

Andrew Brotmann ‘85

Eric Philip ‘87, Dolores “Deeg” Shank ‘87, Pete Frengel ‘87, Christine Olinick Lowry ‘87

Ed Weber ‘89

Are you an alum reading right now and want to share a story with us? Add yours to the People’s History of WDCV!

 

David Dixon’ 80

David Dixon ’80

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My favorite memory was interviewing The Ramones, on-air, prior to one of their concerts at Dickinson. Joey, Deedee, Johnny, and I think Tommy Ramone all crammed into the tiny, secondary studio, with me and the Program Manager, and we just talked.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Downstairs at the HUB, to the right of the college store. I think the area has been taken over by the college store now. We expanded out the back for record storage (yeah, we actually had “records” back then). We also installed a new transmitter and increased our wattage during my time there.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“It provides a great outlet for new music, and allows college students to express themselves through music. When I ran DCV, our format ranged from Rock’n’roll to classical, and everything in between. We encouraged our DJs to show off their divergent interests in music, and they created some very innovative shows.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I never had more fun than the time I spent on-air at DCV”

 

Tom Hamill ‘80

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I was TJ the DJ. Freshman year I did a 8-10 am Thursday show.  Junior year I did something like 4-7 on Sunday.  Plus I did a lot of cover shifts so I got a lot of different air time.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“1976 was the beginning of the punk revolution.  While I was listening to ELO, ELP, Yes and Genesis at the time, I was intrigued by the Ramones and Sex Pistols and brought a little of that into my show.  The Music Director heard it and came down to tell me it wasn’t good music for the time slot.  He also helped me out a lot with my music mixing techniques so it was overall a plus visit.  But I wound up mellowing my playlist way down.  In May, the last day he was Music Director, he came into my show, grabbed the Ramones  and put them on the turntable.  I looked at him quizzically as he started Blitzkrieg Bop.  He said “hey, I was wrong, loosen up.””

Who was the WDCV advisor at that time?

“We had an advisor?”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Progressive radio rocks!  You miss 99% of the music with no crossover on commercial radio.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I always loved requests because you knew somebody was listening but you can only play Moondance so many times.  And then there were the townies with Budgie.”

 

Laurel Dickson-Bull ‘80 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I can’t remember! I think I was on Saturday mornings and it was a Rock show.” 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The radio station back in 1977 was pretty basic and pretty grimy, but I loved it. People actually smoked in the radio station! The albums were all vinyl of course and kept in a library in a side room. I remember Dewitt Long had a great jazz show and Dave Manges knew everything about contemporary rock… Jennings (what was his first name, Jim? Paul? …) anyway, he booked the best concerts. The Ramones, Warren Zevon, Steve Martin, Hot Tuna, Buddy Guy, Steve Goodman. Such a well-chosen eclectic mix!”

 

Frances Fernandez ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Ebony in motion TGIF 2-5 FRIDAYS”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ from freshman year through graduation, Production staff prom carts, New LP reviews”. 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“What happens at WDCV stays at WDCV”.

 

Andrew Hyde ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had several shows:

— a rock show for three hours on Thursday nights

— a half hour reggae show on Tuesday evenings

— a Big Band show on Sunday afternoons.

I was also news director for awhile”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The best story on which I have based a draft play is the experience at the radio station when 3 Mile Island erupted.  Being underground, the station was rated as an emergency broadcaster.  We had a struggle with President Sam Banks, however, when he suggested evacuating all the students.  We stayed on the air with volunteers, however, throughout the whole crisis.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“It was also on the lower level of the hub but just opposite the exit from the circular staircase.  i think there is a convenience store there now (what a travesty! 🙂 )”

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

Elizabeth G. (Betsy Gill) Walters ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember a name, but as I recall, my show aired on weekday mornings. I remember that it played in the cafeteria during breakfast, which meant that I got lots of commentary from my friends. (In those days, kids actually showed up at the cafeteria three times a day.)”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I played the music I liked at the time– I suppose it would best be described as “girly soft rock” — I certainly liked and played Eric Clapton, the Beatles, Elton John, Steppenwolf, Steely Dan, Lynrd Skynrd and the Grateful Dead, but also lots of Dan Fogelberg, Pure Prairie League, and a particularly sappy song called “Wildfire,” (by Michael Somebody-or-other, I think.)

I also parlayed my WDCV experience into an internship with a local radio station and was ultimately hired as a local radio newscaster. That career was brief, but fun. It particularly impressed my parents, who heard me for the first time as they drove into Carlisle for a visit, and said I sounded just like a real person. :)”

Barb Freda ‘81 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember any name, but Maureen Fitzgerald was the official host. We agreed to do it together and she was the one who passed whatever it was to make it official. If I recall correctly, we were on on Sunday nights from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I remember being so tired I didn’t want to play a lot more songs, so I decided to play all of one side of an Alan Parsons Project album, I Robot (which I just dredged up from my memory–30 years gone by…listening to it right now). I got some comments about that, including something about weird music I had chosen. I’m guessing I played other things that had nothing to do with that music: Stephen Bishop, Linda Ronstadt…Maureen may remember more.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“We could do what we wanted to with no agenda. Glad to know Dickinson still has its radio station.”

Greg Zimmerman ‘83

Live from the WDCV Studio! (Gregory E. Zimmerman circa ’82)

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Breakfast with the Clash, early morning.  Also did Saturday evening fill-ins.  Also had a political commentary show with Professor Andrews for the 1980 presidential primaries and election”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ and political commentator”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I loved the commentaries with Professor Andrews, and I remember playing INXS for the first time on campus when their debut album, Shabooh Shoobah came out.”

 

Bill Epperly ‘83 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had 3-4 shows over the years. Not sure they had names: a classical show, a new music show, a comedy show.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“I think so. It is one place where the particular culture of the campus shows itself.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Being part of WDCV was one of the great experiences of my college days. I’m so grateful for the experience!”

Show Schedule 1981-My little eye just spotted something of note in this schedule. Friday 8-10am lists Roseann O’Donnell for the show “Good Morning Carlisle!” Could it be THE Rosie O’Donnell? We are pretty sure it is as she went here for just one year. We didn’t know she was a DJ though. Her show description reads: “Contemporary and Mellow Tunes to dry your hair by”

 

David Alterman ‘83

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I did a comedy show where Bill Epperly and I played comic routines on the radio.

We also performed a few original routines as well. 

I also did a classical music hour. It was slotted in between a hip-hop hour and a new wave rock hour.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I dj’d some kind of show every year I was there either a comedy or classical music show.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“We once had a very renowned Early Music (medeval music) conductor and performer named Thomas Binkley visit my senior year. Prof. Slavin gave me some of his LP records to play on the radio to honor his visit. 

After the hip-hop hour, I came on. I proudly announced what I was going to play, a “salterello” quick medeval dance. I had never heard the piece before. 

After a few seconds, the phone rang. That was unusual for the classical show. Usually when it rang folks were dissappointed I was not playing hip-hop music and after I told them this was the classical hour, they always either requested “Bolero” or Pachabel’s “Cannon”. This call was different. 

“David, this is Betzi.” I think the music is playing too fast.”

Indeed, I forgot to change the LP speed from 78 for the previous show, to 33 1/3 for mine.

I got a real dirty look from Prof. Binkey the next day, he was not very nice to me the rest of his visit and I had to sing for him for about a week or 2.”

 

Stu Fischer (with a “C”) ‘83

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had time slots in the morning, either from 8 to 10 or from 10 to 12 on various days during my last three years at Dickinson (1980-1983) except for the Fall of 1981 when I was on the Washington Semester.  Because there (incredibly) was a Stu Fisher on campus that I was always confused with–and who often got my mail because he had the more common spelling of an uncommon name–I called my radio show the “Stu Fischer with a “C”‘ show to try and distinguish myself.  After Stu Fisher graduated in 1982, I changed the name of my show to “The Grand Illusion”, the show that is so good that it’s unreal.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“In addition to being a DJ, I recorded a station ID that was used for years, imitating the voice of the 1960s cartoon character, Underdog (actually imitating his voice, the actor Wally Cox).  The promo went like this: “There’s no need to fear, Underdog is here!/When I’m through with a day of fighting crime/I like to go home and sit around and unwind/And when I want great music it’s plain to see/I just change my dial to WDCV/88.3 on your FM dial, give us a listen, it will be worth your while.””

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“1. Regarding the Underdog promo: back when I was working at WDCV, we used tape “carts” (cartridges) to play PSAs and Station IDs, but many DJs would forget to rewind them after they played so there would be a dreaded click when we put them on, followed by dead air.  What I always did was if that happened to me, I just started doing my Underdog station ID live and went into the next record.  If I had no cart problems during my entire show, then I did the Underdog ID live near the end of my shift.

  1. I was the first person on the air the morning after John Lennon was killed in December 1980.  I played an all Lennon show and told stories about Lennon (which I knew as a Beatles fan).  At the beginning of the shift I got an angry call from someone that was not aware what had happened and thought that I was pulling a sick joke. 
  2. I was also on the air when the hostages were released from Iran on January 20, 1981.  As a Democrat, I was appalled at Ronald Reagan’s election and volunteered to take all of the shifts from 10 to 2 that day (the semester was just starting and a permanent schedule had not been made yet). I was playing protest songs all day and heard the teletype ring like crazy when the hostages were released.  So I actually got to turn the sound down on my record, take the mike and say “we interrupt this program for a special bulletin!”  That was the highlight of my tenure at WDCV. 
  3. I always tried to do theme shows on my shift, but one feature that I always did was the “Trivial Person of the Day” contest.  The shpiel went like this: “Since we go to a liberal arts college, we should be above expecting material rewards for our achievements, therefore there is NO PRIZE given for winning the Trivial Person of the Day contest, just the pride and joy of knowing that you are the only person in the entire known universe that can call yourself the Trivial Person of the Day.”  Then I asked a musical trivia question and the first one to answer correctly won and got another canned spiel ending with me applauding.  Near the end of 1981, Roseann O’Donnell (now going as Rosie) substituted on the show after mine with Bill Hill III and started asking follow-up trivia questions to my then-winner, a Carlisle pharmacist named Bob Smith who was the first person to win the contest three times.  In 2009, when I joined Facebook, I revived the Trivial Person contest (this time as the Trivial Person of the Week) and have folks from all over the country (including Jeopardy champions) playing.  Dan Davis (1983) is the only person so far to win the contest on WDCV and on Facebook.”

 

John Philip ’83

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Wednesday Night Heavyweight Lineup with Jack Morris 8-10, me 10 to midnight, Tom Fleming midnight to when he got tired). 3 idiot football teammates playing music.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Was there when we turned on the 450 watt transmitter in 1981.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years. We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio. Do you think college radio is still important? Tell us why!

“Yes. While terrestrial radio is all but dead as an important enitity (am is a wasteland of extremist ideology and sports betting programming) there is a need for an eclectic place to broadcast music and discourse.”

Do you have any WDCV memorabilia hidden away that you might want to share with us? Please tell us what you think you may have and we will find a way to get a copy to us.

“I have some tapes from 1981 and that I can attempt to digitalize including a roast beef sandwich eating contest broadcast live in November 1982 from Rax Roastbeef on High Street and a March 1982 hockey game between Dickinson and Bucknell.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Love WDCV. Still listen online.”

 

Roderic Flowers ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Soul Shot in 1980, then Soul Connection from 1981-1984 from 2p-4p”

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started as a DJ at WDCV playing oldies and R&B.  I also served as Music Director for 2 years.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When I came to Dickinson in 1980 they were looking for variety and alternative music for WDCV.   I was told that freshmen rarely get a prime time slot, if any, however, I was fortunate enough to get a prime time Saturday afternoon slot because I was going to play oldies, doo-wop and R&B, which was something that they never had before. I seized the opportunity and called by radio show -Soul Shot because I thought that might be my “sole shot.”  As fate would have it,  the show was well received and I was asked to return.  I called myself the House Shocker, the Rhythm Rocker from that point forward.”

 

Lori Pellnitz ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had a number of time slots when I was at WDCV. My first one was Tuesday mornings from 10am to noon. It was my first semester freshman years – and I had a thick Long Island accent and called myself  “The Islander.” I pretty much played various rock songs. I eventually migrated to my favorite time slot, which was Friday from 5pm-7pm and played “New Wave and Reggae” and the show didn’t have any name in particular.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Started my first semester freshman year. By my sophomore year I was on the Exec Board and was the Public Affairs Manager. I also DJ’d, broadcast the news and sports.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I used to play alternative/new wave music when not many stations were playing it. I would go home to Long Island and record hours and hours of music from one of the top alt music stations in the country, then would go back to Carlisle and play some of the music I recorded on my show. One of the incidents that I really remember was the first time I played “Holiday” by Madonna. She was virtually unknown back then. The phone started ringing off the wall with people wanting to know the name of the song and who was the performing artist.”

 

Laurie Bacon ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember the name of our show, but Tammy Nestuk (’83) and I played classical music on Sunday mornings. This was during the 1980-81 school year, I think. (perhaps 81-82)

A symphony gave us plenty of time to throw laundry in the wash or the dryer just down the hall in the HUB basement.

This was when the station’s bandwidth was much less that it was just a few years later. I was grateful to have the opportunity to do something like this – I never would have been able to at a bigger school.

Happy 50th! (wait, I’m a year older that WDCV? oh my, I don’t know what to make of that.)

:)”

 

John Basso ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Uncle John’s Band: 7-8pm every Monday night…”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Live Dead tapes played with a little history of the band, I recall it was on Monday’s as John Lennon was murdered on a Monday night and the AP ticker would spit out the news to read live on air, i had just gotten off the air when the next DJ, John Black, announced the news…everyone wore black on Tuesday…”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The doctors from Harrisburg would call the show and ask what year was the recording from, I had an extensive collection of bootleg cassettes and the campus had loads of deadheads, it was nice being at frat parties and someone would say they liked my show…”

 

Andrew Brotmann ‘85

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Sound Connection- Fridays from 6-8PM”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My first time slot was Saturday morning from 6-8AM. By senior year i had graduated to the 6-8PM slot on Friday evenings, just while everyone was getting ready to go out. My most memorable moment was doing a ‘War of the Worlds’ type show where I said that portions of the campus were under attack. Since it was 6:30 in the morning, i figured no one was listening. But, we started receiving calls from the Carlisle PD and Fire Dept and I had to cut my planned show short. Who knew so many Townies listed to WDCV?”

 

Photo from 1980(ish)

Eric Philip ‘87

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Rumble Show.  Played on Saturday nights.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started as a Freshman as a fill in.  I had regular slots my sophomore and senior years.  (Did my junior year abroad,).”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Here are some random memories.  I played straight roots influenced rock and roll when new wave was the rage. “Rumble” by Link Wray was the show’s theme song. I used to get a lot of calls for requests and many were from people in the local listening area (non-student). The show went on relatively early on Saturday night and many people listened prior to heading out to the quad to party.  I’d have people come up and talk to me later in the night about different songs. Back at the time I had to buy and play my own records although I found a few (very few) gems in the library.  So I played a lot of deep cuts. One of my fraternity buddies caught some guys walking down the street one day with a box of my records (they dropped them and ran when challenged). In those days we had to play periodic PSAs which were on “carts” that were like an 8 track tape. I tried to find the shortest ones possible so as not to detract from the listening experience.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes – it’s a creative outlet for students. Radio remains an art form – the segue between songs, the narration about a band or a track, the difference between shows.  It’s dominated commercially by bot driven playlists which has taken a lot of the art away.  College radio is one of the few places where that tradition can remain.”

Dolores “Deeg” Shank ‘87

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I got a phone call after the activities night asking did I still want to do a Sinatra show. Of course I said yes. He asked if I could start that night. Yes! I went to the station (felt like a closet off where convenience stores is now in the HUB.) He ‘showed me the turntables, 8-track PSA stuff, mics, etc. Then he says, you’ll be fine, call me if you need help…and I was in the air in about 10 min. Later! When I returned to the airwaves in 2010 (Davis Tracy hooked me up) it was still the same control board as 1987! That was funny! Since upgraded but it was nostalgic for a while.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“‘Closet’ at bottom of spiral staircase in HUB.”

Live from the WDCV Studio! (Cheryl A. De Bari ’81)

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes! It’s freedom not found on commercial radio. No “obligations” to owners/sponsors/commercials. Such great variety or shows too. I am sooooo thankful I am able to continue my show and keep the music I love on the airwaves. Thank you Dickinson and all who keep it on the air!!!”

February 16th, 1989- WDCV Soon to Air in Stereo

 

 

Pete Frengel ‘87

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“”College Rock Radio” – If I remember correctly (and there’s only a slim chance of that) my show was on Saturday afternoons, maybe 4:00 to 6:00, in 1984-85 and 1986-87.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a very, very small part of a movement that popularized “college rock” nationwide – a movement that eventually became known as “alternative,” or “alternative rock.”  According to wikipedia, “These [college] stations were the majority broadcasters of this music, as the stations’ playlists were often created by students who preferred underground rock music.” 

Bands like U2, R.E.M., the Talking Heads, the Smiths and the Cure went on to commercial success, but in the early 80’s they were considered edgy and not mainstream.  Other great bands never made it as big, but were widely respected on college campuses: Hüsker Dü, Sonic Youth, the Meat Puppets, Dinosaur Jr., the Replacements, Violent Femmes, Camper Van Beethoven, and the Pixies, to name a few.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My friend, Randy Ensley (’85), aka “Slomo,” loved classic rock of the 60’s and 70’s and had less appreciation for the new music coming out.  When I knew he was listening to my show, I’d use the two turntables to blend a portion of Led Zepplin into a Smiths song, or segue some Pink Floyd into the bridge of an R.E.M. song.  I’m not sure that I did too much to further my “college rock” cause, but it kept us amused at the time.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Descending the circular staircase in the HUB, you’d make a right and it was straight ahead.  In the backroom there were thousands of LPs – a treasure trove – but I mostly brought my own in a milk crate.”

Christine Olinick Lowry ‘87

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“It took place near dinner time once a week. Whenever we started broadcasting, the Holland Union Building speakers would be turned off.  I remember it was very popular with the local prison and we would get requests from there.  We played all the popular Hard Rock/Metal of the time and my co-DJ would wheel his albums in a kid’s wagon over to the station because DCV did not have the appropriate material.  I think we were also one of the first to play Guns and Roses on the radio. The station had received an advanced copy of their first album and we enjoyed playing it.  On our final show we played a song by WASP that pushed the envelope, but it was a fun farewell.”

 

Jeannie Gabardine Thatcher ‘88

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“House on Pooh Corner, Tuesdays and Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to noon”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a freshman and a friend of mine from Phi Psi had a show, couldn’t do it at the last minute and asked me to fill in.  Talk about learning as you go!   It was a lucky break because I had a show all four years.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Only that I loved every second of it. It was back in the day when you brought your own albums along with using what the station had. It was great running into people who said, I heard your show today and I loved that song ….. I had a following albeit a small one.”

 

Ed Weber ‘89

Photo from 1980(ish)

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I had a two-hour time slot. I had a friend that had a time slot adjacent to mine. We were both Who fans. One week we took all four hours and played nothing but back-to-back Who songs. We even played different versions of the same song one right after the other. The weirdest thing we did was put the same record on two different turntables and played them at the same time. It created quite a strange stereo effect. I’m not sure how much our listeners cared for our creativity.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“I think it is important because it gives an independent creative outlet, and allows students to decide what types of music and information is broadcast on campus and in Carlisle.”

 

David Brower ‘89

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember giving my shows names.  I did the standard rotation shows in the evenings.  One year I hosted The Cumberland County Revue Sunday mornings.  I remember Davis Tracy calling me one morning with a compliment on the bluegrass I was playing at the time.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a DJ and then spent 2 years as Music Director, or some would say Music Dictator.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I loved hanging out at the station and opening the mail.  We’d get so many great and important records.  We also had fun booking concerts to put on at ATS.  We had a constant fight against the group that booked lame big name bands.  I fondly remember one of our young DJs doing a cookout outside Kline center during the Eddie Money show.  He gave away free hot dogs to anyone that was NOT going to the concert.   That was the year I couldn’t find $250 to book the Indigo Girls to play at the snar.”

 

Tom Ciglar ‘89

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started doing shows with a friend in 1987. He had a lunch time oldies show. I started doing my own show in the winter of 1988 and I guess you would have called it “college rock”, though I did occasionally fill in for one or two of the metal shows.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“No secrets, but I do remember helping set up some station id’s with guests at Dickinson, Abby Hoffman being one of them. Also remember one of dj’s being on a semester abroad in England and seeing Billy Bragg on the street in London, accosting him with a tape recorder and coaching him through a station id right there on the street. 

Getting to see the Ramones in Baltimore on comp tickets so that we could interview their opening band. I don’t remember the opener’s name, they never made it big, and the Ramones wanted nothing to do with us, but still I got to see the Ramones live. 

Some of the radio staff got a little tired of quality of the spring concerts in those days so we started a music production company of our own and brought bands to campus for smaller shows. We weren’t much of a financial success, but we did bring some great groups to campus. I remember Fugazi, Kingface, the Cynics, and a number of others playing ATS. It was great to be part of it.”

 

Erika DeCree ‘89

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Caffeine Express – Tues. & Thurs 6-8am  1986-87, Sunshine Daydreams – Wed 2-4pm 1987-88”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

WDCV Shirt Logo Late 80s/Early 90s

“Started Spring of Freshman year (1986) as an intern for Seniors Janice Rowley 7 Helen Seaman. Personnel Director 1986-87 semesters.

It was all about the music all the time!”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When the Class Officers/Senate selected Eddie Money for the Spring Concert, there was a velvet revolution at DCV.  Several of us, appalled by the uninspired selection, played Eddie Money ad nauseum.  The campus was sick of him before he ever got to the Kline Center.  Eddie then berated the student body, from the stage, for not “showing up”.  It was basically supported by the Carlisle locals.”