Tamales Build Community

Jackie Amezcua, Gaby Corcoran, and Leo García

If I’ve learned anything from my Mexican culture, it’s that nothing brings us together faster than food. This proved to be true yet again when guest speaker Professor Jeffrey Pilcher of the University of Toronto visited campus in collaboration with the LALC and History departments. Pilcher’s talk explored the topic of beer and food as a focus of cultural study and understanding. Prior to his lecture, however, professors, students, staff, and our guest speaker came together to make a traditional Mexican dish: tamales. Although different forms of tamales are eaten throughout Latin America, Professor Héctor Reyes Zaga revealed his family’s top secret tamale recipe from México. Many Latino and non-Latino students, faculty, and staff came together to enjoy the delicious history told through tamales. There’s nothing quite as gratifying as joining mi gente from all over Latin America to enjoy dishes I’d normally eat during holidays and instead creating new memories, bridging the invisible geographic borders that divide our countries. 3,000 miles away from home, I find community in sharing cultural dishes and joking about who cries first after having eaten a spicy dish. Food brings us together because regardless of whatever language you speak, or wherever you’re from, we can all enjoy a mouthwatering plate of rich food.

By Jacqueline Amezcua (LALC Studies major ’19)

 

Noted Latin Americanist and food historian Jeffrey Pilcher was in residence at Dickinson on March 30 and 31, 2017. He delivered the annual Pflaum lecture and participated in a Clarke Forum-sponsored salon to discuss his work. Before the lecture, students, faculty, and guests got together for a tamales-making session, supervised by LALC Studies and Spanish Department Professor Héctor Reyes-Zaga.

 

LALC Spring 2017 Courses Offer

SPRING 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
LALC 121-02 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Kimberly McNair
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-02. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
LALC 200-01 Latina/o Popular Culture
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-01. This course will examine how the increasing diversity of audiences, voices, and participants in popular culture point to deficits, needs, and changes in American culture. Focusing specifically on Latinas/os, we will analyze representation of Latinas/os in a variety of different genres music, film, sports, and television for what they tell us about race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and language. We will look particularly at how Latinas/os negotiate mainstream media representations and create new forms of culture expression. Exploring how Latinas/os produce media representations that defy both narrow understandings of Latinidad as well as dominant U.S. culture, class discussion will explore how identity is produced and contested through popular culture.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
LALC 200-02 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01 and PORT 380-01. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
LALC 231-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 131-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as HIST 131.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
LALC 295-01 Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 295-01.Taught in Spanish. This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: SPAN 231. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 295.
1500:TR   ALTHSE 109
LALC 301-01 Undocumented in America
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 303-01.”Undocumented immigrants,” Luis Alberto Urrea writes, “have no way to tell you what they have experienced . . . They are, by the very nature of their experience, invisible.” In actuality, the undocumented aren’t invisible, so much as “hidden in plain sight,” they are exempted of legal membership, deprived of political rights, and confined to spaces outside of recognition or public concern. How do producers of culture try to capture lives and experiences that are silenced and invisible to the broader public? This interdisciplinary course will try to engage directly with both the history of legal and economic parameters that designate one as undocumented and how narratives, artistic representations, and media that endeavor to portray and symbolize these particular immigrants. This class will pay particular attention to how legal, political, and economic designations of immigrant’s “illegal” or “undocumented” status depend on and sustain U.S. discourse about race and ethnicity.
1030:TR   DENNY 21
LALC 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 304-01 and PORT 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese.This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and AFST 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
LALC 390-01 Do Your Friends Really Like You?
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
1500:M   WESTC 1
LALC 550-01 Female Political Participation in Argentina
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 201
AFST 100-02 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Kimberly McNair
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-02. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1030:TR   BOSLER 208
AFST 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 304-01 and PORT 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as PORT 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 Latina/o Popular Culture
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01. This course will examine how the increasing diversity of audiences, voices, and participants in popular culture point to deficits, needs, and changes in American culture. Focusing specifically on Latinas/os, we will analyze representation of Latinas/os in a variety of different genres music, film, sports, and television for what they tell us about race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and language. We will look particularly at how Latinas/os negotiate mainstream media representations and create new forms of culture expression. Exploring how Latinas/os produce media representations that defy both narrow understandings of Latinidad as well as dominant U.S. culture, class discussion will explore how identity is produced and contested through popular culture.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 210-01 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02 and PORT 380-01. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 304-01 Afro-Brazilian Literature
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 304-01 and LALC 304-01. This class analyzes the literary production of Afro-Brazilians writers, as well as the representation of Afro-Brazilian characters in literary texts. It reviews different literary periods and the images those periods created and/or challenged and how they have affected and continue to affect the lives of Afro-Brazilians. Also, by paying particular attention to gender and social issues in different regional contexts, the class considers how Brazilian authors of African descent critically approach national discourses, such as racial democracy and Brazilianness. Taught in English. Available as a FLIC option in Portuguese. This course is cross-listed as AFST 304 and LALC 304. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
PORT 380-01 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MUAC 210-01 and LALC 200-02. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 295-01 Introduction to U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 295-01.Taught in Spanish. This interdisciplinary introduction to Latina/o Studies discusses foundational historical, cultural, political, artistic, and literary texts of the U.S. Latina/o community. This class will cover diasporic movements and issues of identity, with a particular focus on the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban-American diaspora. Prerequisite: 231. This course is cross-listed as LALC 295
1500:TR   ALTHSE 109
SPAN 410-01 Do Your Friends Really Like You?
Instructor: Jorge Sagastume
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01.
1330:W   ALTHSE 07

“La Cucaracha” and Political Satire

“La Cucaracha” and Political Satire
Political cartoonist, satirist & television writer, Lalo Alcaraz 
 
Tuesday, February 7, 2017 
Stern Center, Great Room, 7 p.m.
 
Alcaraz will present an illustrated lecture on his cartoons, work in political satire, and writing/producing in Hollywood.
 
Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally syndicated, politically themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” which is read in American newspapers nationwide, including the Los Angeles Times. Lalo’s comics are syndicated by Universal Uclick, home of “Doonesbury” and “The Boondocks.” Lalo produced editorial  cartoons for The LA Weekly from 1992-2010 and now creates  editorial cartoons in English and Spanish for Universal. Lalo’s books include Latino USA: A Cartoon History (2000 by Basic Books), and Migra Mouse: Political Cartoons On Immigration,(2004). Alcaraz also authored the first collection of his daily comic strips, “La Cucaracha.” (2004, Andrews-McMeel Publishing.) His upcoming book is Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States (2014 by Basic Books). Lalo taught editorial illustration at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles in 2013. Alcaraz was a writer and producer of “Bordertown,” the animated TV show on FOX, which
ran for one triumphant 13 episode season before being canceled. Lalo is also consultant on the upcoming 2017 Pixar film, COCO. Alcaraz was a segment producer on Al Madrigal’s (Daily Show) “Half Like Me” comedy special for Fusion/ABC. Lalo is also featured on the upcoming HBO Latino program “Habla y Vota” special along with George Lopez and Jorge Ramos.
Lalo Alcaraz has received five Southern California Journalism Awards for Best Cartoon in  Weekly Papers, and numerous other awards and honors.
 
This program is sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues and co-sponsored by the Departments of Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies, and Spanish & Portuguese.

Posada Conference Keynote Speech – Videos

On Nov. 5 and Nov. 6, 2016, Dickinson College successfully hosted Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satire in Latin America, a two-day conference sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This international conference provided a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America.
The conference keynote speaker is William Beezley (University of Arizona), noted historian of Mexico and Latin America and author and editor of numerous books, including Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico(1987), Latin American Popular Culture: An Introduction (Linda Curcio-Nagy, 2000), and A Companion to Mexican History and Culture (2011).

Access to the whole speech can be found here.

Posada Conference Poster IMG_1412 IMG_1400FullSizeRender[8]

Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo – Photos Recap

On Nov. 5 and Nov. 6, 2016, Dickinson College successfully hosted Posada Conference 2016: Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satire in Latin America, a two-day conference sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This international conference provided a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America.

Posada Conference Poster

EXHIBIT

The Trout Gallery – the art museum at Dickinson College – has been presenting José Guadalupe Posada and the Broadside in Early Twentieth-Century Mexico since Oct. 28, 2016. For more information, visit The Trout Gallerie Exhibition Website here.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Conference Program

Friday, November 4th

5pm – Altar Offerings. Waidner-Spahr Library

6pm – Keynote Speaker. Althouse 106

Professor William Beezley, University of Arizona, “Laughter and Hope: Humor in Everyday Life in Mexico”

 

7pm – Reception. Weiss Center

7-9pm – Sugar Skull-Making Workshop.

Saturday, November 5th

8:30am Coffee – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

9:00am Panel #1 – Althouse 106

1. Gabriel Antúnez de Mayolo Kou, University of Wisconsin-Madison, “Boogie, el “americano”: el uso de parámetros globales en la adaptación cinematográfica animada de la tira cómica Boogie, el aceitoso de Fontanarrosa”

2. Lloyd Anglin, Universidad Veritas: Costa Rica, “Humor gráfico en Costa Rica: identidad y otredad 1917-1948”

10:00am Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

10:15am Panel # 2 – Althouse 106

1. Jason A. Bartles, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, “El Gaucho Jodón: Mocking Nationalism in Juan Filloy’s Ochoa Family Saga”

2. Brian Bockelman, Ripon College, “‘Poor Palms’ and Petty Politicos: The Role and Forms of Satire in the Argentine Plaza Palms Crisis of 1883”

3. María del Pilar Aja Pérez, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, “Goya’s and Goitia’s Hanged Men: Ironic and Grotesque Sociopolitical Criticism at War Periods.”

11:30am Tour of Exhibit “José Guadalupe Posada and the Mexican Penny Press” – Trout Gallery (Weiss Center)

Trout Gallery Director and Associate Professor of Art History Phillip Earenfight

12:30pm Lunch and Student Poster Presentation. HUB

2:00pm Panel # 3 – Althouse 106

1. Ana Yolanda Contreras, United States Naval Academy, “Memes humorísticos, irreverencia y crítica sociopolítica contra los ex-mandatarios guatemaltecos”

2. Elizabeth Cooper, Gettysburg College, “Correa’s #CaricaturaCrackdown: Social Media, Satire, and Free Speech in Ecuador”

3. Michele Nascimento-Kettner, Montclair State University, “‘Rir para não Chorar’: Why Laughing Matters in Brazil’s Current Political Debates?

4. José Alfredo Contreras, University of Maryland, College Park, “Current Events and Culture as Laughing Matter in Hernández and Helguera’s Monosapiens”

3:20pm Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

3:35pm Panel # 4 – Althouse 106

1. Jacqueline Avila, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, “El espectáculo on Stage and Screen: Evocations of the teatro de revistas in cine mexicano”

2. Marina Fleites, Gettysburg College, “Pushing the Critical Limits in Tomás Gutiérrez Alea’s La Muerte de un Burócrata (1966) and Guantanamera (1994)”

4:40pm Closing Reception

Say “Yes” to Argentina (from The Dickinsonian)

Letter from Abroad

Carol May ’18, Abroad Columnist

September 22, 2016

Filed under Life and Style

Screen Shot 2016-10-22 at 3.31.10 PM

Photo Courtesy of Carol May ’18/ The Dickinsonian

Before leaving for my abroad experience in South America, I asked everyone I knew for advice as to how to make the most out of being abroad. Above all else, I was told to always say “yes” when asked to try something new. Little did I know, this one piece of advice would help me make friends with people in class, explore the local sights, and eat some of the best meals I’ve ever had.

My first “yes” occurred in my Political Sociology class here at UNCuyo (our university in Mendoza). Being the only exchange student in the class and still fumbling my way through the Argentine Spanish filled with “vos” and “che” made for a very nerve-wracking experience. But as I was sitting in class, a girl next to me asked if I wanted some Mate, a bitter tea that Argentines consume constantly. I heard the advice of others running through my head, and said “yes”. From there, I got to know the girl and other people in my class simply by sharing Mate. This first “yes” has given me a network of people to help me with my classwork and with anything else I may need while in Argentina.

The second “yes” came when my host sister asked if I wanted to go to Portreillos with her and some friends. Having no clue what that even was, I just immediately said “yes” and I am so glad I did. Despite having to wake up relatively early to get there, I have no regrets about this “yes”. My host sister and I drove over an hour outside of Mendoza and arrived at the foothills of the Andes near a huge lake. Other than the incredible scenery, we shared asado, the sacred art of grilling meats in Argentina, and I met a whole group of her friends. Despite being overwhelmed by having fifteen people talking in crazy fast Spanish all at once, I felt like I was truly experiencing the culture here in Argentina.

Finally, saying “yes” to a dinner out with my host mom and her friend, led me to one of the best meals I’ve had in my life. Even though it was a Friday night and I planned on going out with my friends, I opted instead to eat with my host mom. We went to one of the best restaurants in the city where we shared steak, pasta, empanadas, and of course a wine tasting. While the food was incredible, I also was able to talk with the two women about everyday life in Argentina and share aspects of my culture with them.

As much as being abroad is enjoying your time in a specific place, it is equally about cultural exchange. I love being able to share my experiences from Dickinson and the United States with people here almost as much as I love learning about the culture here. By saying “yes”, I have stepped out of my comfort zone in so many ways and cannot wait to see where other “yes[’s]” take me. ¡Hasta luego!

Source: http://thedickinsonian.com/life-style/2016/09/22/say-yes-to-argentina/

Posada Conference

POSADA CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 4TH, 2016:

MOCKING THE STATUS QUO: SOCIOPOLITICAL HUMOR AND SATIRE IN LATIN AMERICA

 

Posada_Revoltijo

CONFERENCE

Sociopolitical humor and satire have a long tradition in Latin America. Since the 19th century, a variety of artists and writers have contributed to its development. Mexican illustrator José Guadalupe Posada (1851-1913), whose satirical broadsides and calaveras, or “skulls,” provided a critical portrayal of social, cultural and political tensions in Mexico during the Porfiriato and the beginning of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, is considered one of the founding figures of this tradition. Many other figures took this tradition in different directions up to the present. The growth in newspaper circulation and popular media during the 20th century created new outlets for social and political humor and satire, especially in the form of political and comic cartoons. Published in newspapers and in popular graphic publications such as Tia Vicentaand Humor Registrado in Argentina, O Pasquim in Brazil, and Monos y Monadas in Peru, among others, graphic humor became the vehicle of commentary of dominant social conventions and it provided a space to challenge and subvert political structures. In addition to graphic humorists, radio and TV performers have also contributed to the genre. The list of artists, writers and performers who have followed in Posada’s footsteps is long and rich in discursive perspectives, media choices and aesthetic representations – as varied as Quino’s Mafalda, the controversial cartoons of Bonil (Javier Bonilla), the sketches of the long-running Venezuelan show Radio Rochela, and the international TV phenomenon CQC or Caiga quien caiga/Caia quem caia. Publication and performance outlets have increased and audiences have diversified with new media and digital content.

Dickinson College will host a two-day conference on Nov. 5 and 6 sponsored by The Central Pennsylvania Consortium, as well as Franklin & Marshall College and Gettysburg College. This two-day international conference provides a forum to address the various and manifold developments in the fields of humor and politics in Latin America. The conference will provide an important opportunity to attend the inauguration of José Guadalupe Posada’s exhibit and aims to bring together academics working across interdisciplinary fields.

EXHIBIT

The Trout Gallery – the art museum at Dickinson College – will present José Guadalupe Posada and the Broadside in Early Twentieth-Century Mexico. This exhibition features over sixty works of graphic art by Posada and his contemporaries, including many of his best-known images of calaveras, sensationalistic crimes, natural disasters, political prints, curious phenomena, chap books, devotional images and game boards. It considers the meaning and importance of Posada’s imagery in turn-of-the century Mexico and its role in society. The exhibition is complemented by an extensive catalogue by curator Diane Miliotes as well as educational programs and a mobile application. For additional information on the exhibition see: www.troutgallery.org. The exhibit will open on Oct. 28, 2016.

 KEYNOTE SPEAKER

The conference keynote speaker will be William Beezley (University of Arizona), noted historian of Mexico and Latin America and author and editor of numerous books, including Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico(1987), Latin American Popular Culture: An Introduction (Linda Curcio-Nagy, 2000), and A Companion to Mexican History and Culture (2011).

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Friday, November 4th

5pm – Altar Offerings. Waidner-Spahr Library

6pm – Keynote Speaker Prof. William Beezley. Althouse 106

7pm – Reception. Weiss Center

7-9pm – Sugar Skull-Making Workshop. Open Arts Lab (Weiss Center). Stop by 20-30 minutes

———

Saturday, November 5th

8:30am Coffee – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

9:00am Panel #1 – Althouse 106

10:00am Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

10:15am Panel # 2 – Althouse 106

11:30am Tour of Exhibit “José Guadalupe Posada and the Mexican Penny Press” – Trout Gallery (Weiss Center)

12:30pm Lunch and Student Poster Presentation. HUB

2:00pm Panel # 3 – Althouse 106

3:10pm Break – Althouse Lounge (first floor)

3:30pm Panel # 4 – Althouse 106

 

REGISTRATION

Registration is free of charge, but if you want to attend the conference and you are not presenting a paper, please, fill out this form:

Registration for “Mocking the Status Quo: Sociopolitical Humor and Satyre in Latin America” Conference

 

LALC Studies Fall 2016 Courses Offer

Fall 2016:

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 101-01 Introduction to Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
A multi-disciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the regions through a study of their history, economics, politics, literature, and culture in transnational and comparative perspective. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework that will prepare students for more specialized courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of LALC studies. Required of all LALC majors.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
LALC 200-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and FLST 210-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
LALC 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as PORT 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
LALC 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1) What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and ANTH 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
LALC 300-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-01 and ENGL 370-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
LALC 300-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 380-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.
1330:TF   BOSLER 313
LALC 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and AFST 320-03. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
LALC 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: SPAN 305. This course is cross-listed as SPAN 341 and is taught in Spanish.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
LALC 490-01 Latin American Interdisciplinary Research
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Research into a topic concerning Latin America directed by two or more faculty representing at least two disciplines. Students must successfully defend their research paper to obtain course credit. The paper is researched and written in the fall semester for one-half course credit and then defended and revised in the spring semester for the other half credit. Prerequisite: senior majors.
0800:W   DENNY 315
LALC 550-01 Female Political Participation in Argentina
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Courses Offered in AFST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 320-03 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 301-01 Freedom Dreams: 20th Century Black Nationalism
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-03 and LALC 301-01. With a specific emphasis on the cultural aspects of black nationalism concentrating on literature, music, and the visual arts, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to reading the canonical primary documents focusing on black nationalism as part of Africana social movements, political consciousness, cultural endeavors, and intellectual traditions. We will critically examine the ideas of a few key theorists and iconic spokespersons and take up the core themes of the tradition. Topics to be explored include the varieties of black nationalism; black selfdetermination; the ideas of race and nation; racial solidarity and group selfreliance; selfdefense and political resistance; the construction of gender roles and configurations of class within black nationalist discourses; the relationship between black identity and black liberation goals; the role of black artistic and cultural expressions in black freedom struggles; and the significance of Africa and the Caribbean for black nationalist ideals. In addition to the work of David Walker, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, and Huey Newton, we will also explore the literary works of Pauline Hopkins, Toni Cade Bambara anthology The Black Woman, Assata Shakurs autobiography, the music of Bob Marley, and the writings of Steven Biko and Patrice Lumumba. We will also discuss some contemporary critical assessments of the tradition and its legacy in contemporary black diasporic social movements. Students who register for this course as LALC 301 must write the final research paper on a Caribbean topic.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ARCH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ARCH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARCH 262-01 South American Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01. This course examines the development of prehistoric societies in the South American continent through archaeological data. This course will explore the interactions of culture, economics, and politics in the prehistory of two major regions: the western Andean mountains and Pacific coast, and the eastern lowlands focusing on the Amazon River basin and Atlantic coast. In addition to learning the particular developments in each region, we will address three overarching themes: 1)What role did the environment play in shaping socio-political developments? 2) What influence do ethnographic and ethno-historical sources have on the interpretation of pre-Hispanic societies in South America? 3) What were the interactions between highland and lowland populations, and what influence did they have (if any) on their respective developments? This course is cross-listed as ANTH 262 and LALC 262.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 370-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
Courses Offered in FLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 210-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-02 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-01 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 242-01 Brazilian Cultural and Social Issues
Instructor: Carolina Castellanos
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 242-01.Taught in English. In this class students learn about a variety of aspects of Brazilian culture and social issues. While highly discussed topics in Brazil and about Brazil, such as carnival, malandragem, and jeitinho are examined, throughout the semester students explore three different types of encounters: Native encounters, African and Afro-Brazilian encounters, and gender encounters. Students analyze these ideas concentrating on the nature of the encounters and the criticisms generated. Also, the class examines issues of representation related to marginalization, violence and banditry. In order to carry out the analysis of ideas and cultural representations and their development, students work with a variety of texts from different disciplines – literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and film – and follow an intersectional methodology. This course is cross-listed as LALC 242. Offered every year.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 341-01 Studies in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Texts
Instructor: Hector Reyes Zaga
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 341-01. This course will analyze major literary and cultural trends in Spanish American narratives and drama of the 20th Century. Special attention will be given to the connection between these works and the important socio-political movements of the time.Prerequisite: 305. This course is cross-listed as LALC 341.
1500:TF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-01 Routes through the Early Americas
Instructor: David Ball, Elise Bartosik-Velez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 370-01 and LALC 300-01.This course will count toward the pre-1800 or post-1800 English major requirement depending on what subjects/writers the indvidual student chooses for his/her projects. The professor of the course will send the appropriate designation for each student to the Registrar’s Office for coding in Banner after the semester is complete. One lens through which to view the history and literary history of the Americas, North and South, is that of national, cultural, and linguistic frontiers. Traditional understandings of this frontier have been dominated by Frederick Jackson Turners thesis, which conceives of that frontier as a single, westward-moving, and continuously receding line across the North American continent that separates the civilized from the barbarous. Recent historians and literary critics of both British and Spanish America have challenged this model, employing theories that employ a hemispheric perspective and take into account zones of contact that are multidirectional, contested, and often discontinuous. Well be testing these hypotheses throughout the semester, as we look at representative works from multicultural and multidisciplinary texts in the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries, including travel journals, political documents, and the visual arts, in addition to more conventionally literary works. At stake will be not only the boundaries of indigenous, colonial, and new national territories, but the very meaning of the terms American and the Americas. Taught in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
SPAN 380-02 19th Century Chilean Literature: Representation of Chile’s First and “Second” Independence
Instructor: Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02. This seminar examines two major historical moments in Chilean history of the nineteenth century and their representations in Chilean literature: the patriots’ fight in the war for independence from the Spanish crown, and the subsequent war between Chile and the Peru-Bolivian Confederation in the 1830s. A series of texts from nineteenth-century political figures and authors will be analyzed to discuss the political and literary representations of these critical events. Such authors may include: Rosario Orrego, Jos Victorino Lastarria, Diego Portales, Mercedes Marn del Solar, Andrs Bello, and Alberto Blest Gana.

Afro-Brazilian Funk Workshop

Afro-Brazilian Funk at Dickinson, Monday, April 11

Afro-BrazilianFunk LALC April 11 bPercussion Workshop and Performance by Dendê and Banda

4:30 Workshop: Learn to play timbal with Dendê (Allison Great Hall)

7:30 Performance by Dendê and Banda (Allison Community Room)

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