A People’s History of WDCV ‘80-’89- What’s So Special About The Radio?

Show Schedule from Spring 1980

It is more important now than ever to preserve creative outlets for freedom of expression! Commercialization of the music industry has stripped artists and the community of this expressive experience, with college radio being free of sponsors and contractual obligations, it protects a true creative community. Our WDCV alums shared with us some of their stories of experimenting artistically on the air and how they cherish their time working with the radio! 

 

Thanks to all the alums from the 80s for sharing their stories!

WDCV T-Shirt from 1980 (Thanks Helen Loidl ’80!)

David Dixon’ 80, Tom Hamill ‘80, Laurel Dickson-Bull ‘80 

Frances Fernandez ‘81, Andrew Hyde ’81, Elizabeth G. (Betsy Gill) Walters ‘81, Barb Freda ’81

Bill Epperly ‘83, John Philip ’83, Greg Zimmerman ‘83, David Alterman ‘83, Stu Fischer (with a “C”) ‘83

Roderic Flowers ‘84, Lori Pellnitz ‘84, Laurie Bacon ’84, John Basso ‘84

Andrew Brotmann ‘85

Eric Philip ‘87, Dolores “Deeg” Shank ‘87, Pete Frengel ‘87, Christine Olinick Lowry ‘87

Ed Weber ‘89

Are you an alum reading right now and want to share a story with us? Add yours to the People’s History of WDCV!

 

David Dixon’ 80

David Dixon ’80

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My favorite memory was interviewing The Ramones, on-air, prior to one of their concerts at Dickinson. Joey, Deedee, Johnny, and I think Tommy Ramone all crammed into the tiny, secondary studio, with me and the Program Manager, and we just talked.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Downstairs at the HUB, to the right of the college store. I think the area has been taken over by the college store now. We expanded out the back for record storage (yeah, we actually had “records” back then). We also installed a new transmitter and increased our wattage during my time there.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“It provides a great outlet for new music, and allows college students to express themselves through music. When I ran DCV, our format ranged from Rock’n’roll to classical, and everything in between. We encouraged our DJs to show off their divergent interests in music, and they created some very innovative shows.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I never had more fun than the time I spent on-air at DCV”

 

Tom Hamill ‘80

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I was TJ the DJ. Freshman year I did a 8-10 am Thursday show.  Junior year I did something like 4-7 on Sunday.  Plus I did a lot of cover shifts so I got a lot of different air time.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“1976 was the beginning of the punk revolution.  While I was listening to ELO, ELP, Yes and Genesis at the time, I was intrigued by the Ramones and Sex Pistols and brought a little of that into my show.  The Music Director heard it and came down to tell me it wasn’t good music for the time slot.  He also helped me out a lot with my music mixing techniques so it was overall a plus visit.  But I wound up mellowing my playlist way down.  In May, the last day he was Music Director, he came into my show, grabbed the Ramones  and put them on the turntable.  I looked at him quizzically as he started Blitzkrieg Bop.  He said “hey, I was wrong, loosen up.””

Who was the WDCV advisor at that time?

“We had an advisor?”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Progressive radio rocks!  You miss 99% of the music with no crossover on commercial radio.”

Any parting thoughts?

“I always loved requests because you knew somebody was listening but you can only play Moondance so many times.  And then there were the townies with Budgie.”

 

Laurel Dickson-Bull ‘80 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I can’t remember! I think I was on Saturday mornings and it was a Rock show.” 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The radio station back in 1977 was pretty basic and pretty grimy, but I loved it. People actually smoked in the radio station! The albums were all vinyl of course and kept in a library in a side room. I remember Dewitt Long had a great jazz show and Dave Manges knew everything about contemporary rock… Jennings (what was his first name, Jim? Paul? …) anyway, he booked the best concerts. The Ramones, Warren Zevon, Steve Martin, Hot Tuna, Buddy Guy, Steve Goodman. Such a well-chosen eclectic mix!”

 

Frances Fernandez ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Ebony in motion TGIF 2-5 FRIDAYS”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ from freshman year through graduation, Production staff prom carts, New LP reviews”. 

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“What happens at WDCV stays at WDCV”.

 

Andrew Hyde ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had several shows:

— a rock show for three hours on Thursday nights

— a half hour reggae show on Tuesday evenings

— a Big Band show on Sunday afternoons.

I was also news director for awhile”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The best story on which I have based a draft play is the experience at the radio station when 3 Mile Island erupted.  Being underground, the station was rated as an emergency broadcaster.  We had a struggle with President Sam Banks, however, when he suggested evacuating all the students.  We stayed on the air with volunteers, however, throughout the whole crisis.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“It was also on the lower level of the hub but just opposite the exit from the circular staircase.  i think there is a convenience store there now (what a travesty! 🙂 )”

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

Elizabeth G. (Betsy Gill) Walters ‘81

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember a name, but as I recall, my show aired on weekday mornings. I remember that it played in the cafeteria during breakfast, which meant that I got lots of commentary from my friends. (In those days, kids actually showed up at the cafeteria three times a day.)”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I played the music I liked at the time– I suppose it would best be described as “girly soft rock” — I certainly liked and played Eric Clapton, the Beatles, Elton John, Steppenwolf, Steely Dan, Lynrd Skynrd and the Grateful Dead, but also lots of Dan Fogelberg, Pure Prairie League, and a particularly sappy song called “Wildfire,” (by Michael Somebody-or-other, I think.)

I also parlayed my WDCV experience into an internship with a local radio station and was ultimately hired as a local radio newscaster. That career was brief, but fun. It particularly impressed my parents, who heard me for the first time as they drove into Carlisle for a visit, and said I sounded just like a real person. :)”

Barb Freda ‘81 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember any name, but Maureen Fitzgerald was the official host. We agreed to do it together and she was the one who passed whatever it was to make it official. If I recall correctly, we were on on Sunday nights from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I remember being so tired I didn’t want to play a lot more songs, so I decided to play all of one side of an Alan Parsons Project album, I Robot (which I just dredged up from my memory–30 years gone by…listening to it right now). I got some comments about that, including something about weird music I had chosen. I’m guessing I played other things that had nothing to do with that music: Stephen Bishop, Linda Ronstadt…Maureen may remember more.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“We could do what we wanted to with no agenda. Glad to know Dickinson still has its radio station.”

Greg Zimmerman ‘83

Live from the WDCV Studio! (Gregory E. Zimmerman circa ’82)

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Breakfast with the Clash, early morning.  Also did Saturday evening fill-ins.  Also had a political commentary show with Professor Andrews for the 1980 presidential primaries and election”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“DJ and political commentator”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I loved the commentaries with Professor Andrews, and I remember playing INXS for the first time on campus when their debut album, Shabooh Shoobah came out.”

 

Bill Epperly ‘83 

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had 3-4 shows over the years. Not sure they had names: a classical show, a new music show, a comedy show.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“I think so. It is one place where the particular culture of the campus shows itself.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Being part of WDCV was one of the great experiences of my college days. I’m so grateful for the experience!”

Show Schedule 1981-My little eye just spotted something of note in this schedule. Friday 8-10am lists Roseann O’Donnell for the show “Good Morning Carlisle!” Could it be THE Rosie O’Donnell? We are pretty sure it is as she went here for just one year. We didn’t know she was a DJ though. Her show description reads: “Contemporary and Mellow Tunes to dry your hair by”

 

David Alterman ‘83

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I did a comedy show where Bill Epperly and I played comic routines on the radio.

We also performed a few original routines as well. 

I also did a classical music hour. It was slotted in between a hip-hop hour and a new wave rock hour.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I dj’d some kind of show every year I was there either a comedy or classical music show.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“We once had a very renowned Early Music (medeval music) conductor and performer named Thomas Binkley visit my senior year. Prof. Slavin gave me some of his LP records to play on the radio to honor his visit. 

After the hip-hop hour, I came on. I proudly announced what I was going to play, a “salterello” quick medeval dance. I had never heard the piece before. 

After a few seconds, the phone rang. That was unusual for the classical show. Usually when it rang folks were dissappointed I was not playing hip-hop music and after I told them this was the classical hour, they always either requested “Bolero” or Pachabel’s “Cannon”. This call was different. 

“David, this is Betzi.” I think the music is playing too fast.”

Indeed, I forgot to change the LP speed from 78 for the previous show, to 33 1/3 for mine.

I got a real dirty look from Prof. Binkey the next day, he was not very nice to me the rest of his visit and I had to sing for him for about a week or 2.”

 

Stu Fischer (with a “C”) ‘83

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had time slots in the morning, either from 8 to 10 or from 10 to 12 on various days during my last three years at Dickinson (1980-1983) except for the Fall of 1981 when I was on the Washington Semester.  Because there (incredibly) was a Stu Fisher on campus that I was always confused with–and who often got my mail because he had the more common spelling of an uncommon name–I called my radio show the “Stu Fischer with a “C”‘ show to try and distinguish myself.  After Stu Fisher graduated in 1982, I changed the name of my show to “The Grand Illusion”, the show that is so good that it’s unreal.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“In addition to being a DJ, I recorded a station ID that was used for years, imitating the voice of the 1960s cartoon character, Underdog (actually imitating his voice, the actor Wally Cox).  The promo went like this: “There’s no need to fear, Underdog is here!/When I’m through with a day of fighting crime/I like to go home and sit around and unwind/And when I want great music it’s plain to see/I just change my dial to WDCV/88.3 on your FM dial, give us a listen, it will be worth your while.””

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“1. Regarding the Underdog promo: back when I was working at WDCV, we used tape “carts” (cartridges) to play PSAs and Station IDs, but many DJs would forget to rewind them after they played so there would be a dreaded click when we put them on, followed by dead air.  What I always did was if that happened to me, I just started doing my Underdog station ID live and went into the next record.  If I had no cart problems during my entire show, then I did the Underdog ID live near the end of my shift.

  1. I was the first person on the air the morning after John Lennon was killed in December 1980.  I played an all Lennon show and told stories about Lennon (which I knew as a Beatles fan).  At the beginning of the shift I got an angry call from someone that was not aware what had happened and thought that I was pulling a sick joke. 
  2. I was also on the air when the hostages were released from Iran on January 20, 1981.  As a Democrat, I was appalled at Ronald Reagan’s election and volunteered to take all of the shifts from 10 to 2 that day (the semester was just starting and a permanent schedule had not been made yet). I was playing protest songs all day and heard the teletype ring like crazy when the hostages were released.  So I actually got to turn the sound down on my record, take the mike and say “we interrupt this program for a special bulletin!”  That was the highlight of my tenure at WDCV. 
  3. I always tried to do theme shows on my shift, but one feature that I always did was the “Trivial Person of the Day” contest.  The shpiel went like this: “Since we go to a liberal arts college, we should be above expecting material rewards for our achievements, therefore there is NO PRIZE given for winning the Trivial Person of the Day contest, just the pride and joy of knowing that you are the only person in the entire known universe that can call yourself the Trivial Person of the Day.”  Then I asked a musical trivia question and the first one to answer correctly won and got another canned spiel ending with me applauding.  Near the end of 1981, Roseann O’Donnell (now going as Rosie) substituted on the show after mine with Bill Hill III and started asking follow-up trivia questions to my then-winner, a Carlisle pharmacist named Bob Smith who was the first person to win the contest three times.  In 2009, when I joined Facebook, I revived the Trivial Person contest (this time as the Trivial Person of the Week) and have folks from all over the country (including Jeopardy champions) playing.  Dan Davis (1983) is the only person so far to win the contest on WDCV and on Facebook.”

 

John Philip ’83

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Wednesday Night Heavyweight Lineup with Jack Morris 8-10, me 10 to midnight, Tom Fleming midnight to when he got tired). 3 idiot football teammates playing music.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Was there when we turned on the 450 watt transmitter in 1981.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years. We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio. Do you think college radio is still important? Tell us why!

“Yes. While terrestrial radio is all but dead as an important enitity (am is a wasteland of extremist ideology and sports betting programming) there is a need for an eclectic place to broadcast music and discourse.”

Do you have any WDCV memorabilia hidden away that you might want to share with us? Please tell us what you think you may have and we will find a way to get a copy to us.

“I have some tapes from 1981 and that I can attempt to digitalize including a roast beef sandwich eating contest broadcast live in November 1982 from Rax Roastbeef on High Street and a March 1982 hockey game between Dickinson and Bucknell.”

Any parting thoughts?

“Love WDCV. Still listen online.”

 

Roderic Flowers ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Soul Shot in 1980, then Soul Connection from 1981-1984 from 2p-4p”

Photos from the station (circa 1982)

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started as a DJ at WDCV playing oldies and R&B.  I also served as Music Director for 2 years.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When I came to Dickinson in 1980 they were looking for variety and alternative music for WDCV.   I was told that freshmen rarely get a prime time slot, if any, however, I was fortunate enough to get a prime time Saturday afternoon slot because I was going to play oldies, doo-wop and R&B, which was something that they never had before. I seized the opportunity and called by radio show -Soul Shot because I thought that might be my “sole shot.”  As fate would have it,  the show was well received and I was asked to return.  I called myself the House Shocker, the Rhythm Rocker from that point forward.”

 

Lori Pellnitz ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I had a number of time slots when I was at WDCV. My first one was Tuesday mornings from 10am to noon. It was my first semester freshman years – and I had a thick Long Island accent and called myself  “The Islander.” I pretty much played various rock songs. I eventually migrated to my favorite time slot, which was Friday from 5pm-7pm and played “New Wave and Reggae” and the show didn’t have any name in particular.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Started my first semester freshman year. By my sophomore year I was on the Exec Board and was the Public Affairs Manager. I also DJ’d, broadcast the news and sports.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I used to play alternative/new wave music when not many stations were playing it. I would go home to Long Island and record hours and hours of music from one of the top alt music stations in the country, then would go back to Carlisle and play some of the music I recorded on my show. One of the incidents that I really remember was the first time I played “Holiday” by Madonna. She was virtually unknown back then. The phone started ringing off the wall with people wanting to know the name of the song and who was the performing artist.”

 

Laurie Bacon ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember the name of our show, but Tammy Nestuk (’83) and I played classical music on Sunday mornings. This was during the 1980-81 school year, I think. (perhaps 81-82)

A symphony gave us plenty of time to throw laundry in the wash or the dryer just down the hall in the HUB basement.

This was when the station’s bandwidth was much less that it was just a few years later. I was grateful to have the opportunity to do something like this – I never would have been able to at a bigger school.

Happy 50th! (wait, I’m a year older that WDCV? oh my, I don’t know what to make of that.)

:)”

 

John Basso ‘84

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Uncle John’s Band: 7-8pm every Monday night…”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“Live Dead tapes played with a little history of the band, I recall it was on Monday’s as John Lennon was murdered on a Monday night and the AP ticker would spit out the news to read live on air, i had just gotten off the air when the next DJ, John Black, announced the news…everyone wore black on Tuesday…”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“The doctors from Harrisburg would call the show and ask what year was the recording from, I had an extensive collection of bootleg cassettes and the campus had loads of deadheads, it was nice being at frat parties and someone would say they liked my show…”

 

Andrew Brotmann ‘85

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Sound Connection- Fridays from 6-8PM”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My first time slot was Saturday morning from 6-8AM. By senior year i had graduated to the 6-8PM slot on Friday evenings, just while everyone was getting ready to go out. My most memorable moment was doing a ‘War of the Worlds’ type show where I said that portions of the campus were under attack. Since it was 6:30 in the morning, i figured no one was listening. But, we started receiving calls from the Carlisle PD and Fire Dept and I had to cut my planned show short. Who knew so many Townies listed to WDCV?”

 

Photo from 1980(ish)

Eric Philip ‘87

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Rumble Show.  Played on Saturday nights.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started as a Freshman as a fill in.  I had regular slots my sophomore and senior years.  (Did my junior year abroad,).”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Here are some random memories.  I played straight roots influenced rock and roll when new wave was the rage. “Rumble” by Link Wray was the show’s theme song. I used to get a lot of calls for requests and many were from people in the local listening area (non-student). The show went on relatively early on Saturday night and many people listened prior to heading out to the quad to party.  I’d have people come up and talk to me later in the night about different songs. Back at the time I had to buy and play my own records although I found a few (very few) gems in the library.  So I played a lot of deep cuts. One of my fraternity buddies caught some guys walking down the street one day with a box of my records (they dropped them and ran when challenged). In those days we had to play periodic PSAs which were on “carts” that were like an 8 track tape. I tried to find the shortest ones possible so as not to detract from the listening experience.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes – it’s a creative outlet for students. Radio remains an art form – the segue between songs, the narration about a band or a track, the difference between shows.  It’s dominated commercially by bot driven playlists which has taken a lot of the art away.  College radio is one of the few places where that tradition can remain.”

Dolores “Deeg” Shank ‘87

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I got a phone call after the activities night asking did I still want to do a Sinatra show. Of course I said yes. He asked if I could start that night. Yes! I went to the station (felt like a closet off where convenience stores is now in the HUB.) He ‘showed me the turntables, 8-track PSA stuff, mics, etc. Then he says, you’ll be fine, call me if you need help…and I was in the air in about 10 min. Later! When I returned to the airwaves in 2010 (Davis Tracy hooked me up) it was still the same control board as 1987! That was funny! Since upgraded but it was nostalgic for a while.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“‘Closet’ at bottom of spiral staircase in HUB.”

Live from the WDCV Studio! (Cheryl A. De Bari ’81)

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“Yes! It’s freedom not found on commercial radio. No “obligations” to owners/sponsors/commercials. Such great variety or shows too. I am sooooo thankful I am able to continue my show and keep the music I love on the airwaves. Thank you Dickinson and all who keep it on the air!!!”

February 16th, 1989- WDCV Soon to Air in Stereo

 

 

Pete Frengel ‘87

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“”College Rock Radio” – If I remember correctly (and there’s only a slim chance of that) my show was on Saturday afternoons, maybe 4:00 to 6:00, in 1984-85 and 1986-87.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a very, very small part of a movement that popularized “college rock” nationwide – a movement that eventually became known as “alternative,” or “alternative rock.”  According to wikipedia, “These [college] stations were the majority broadcasters of this music, as the stations’ playlists were often created by students who preferred underground rock music.” 

Bands like U2, R.E.M., the Talking Heads, the Smiths and the Cure went on to commercial success, but in the early 80’s they were considered edgy and not mainstream.  Other great bands never made it as big, but were widely respected on college campuses: Hüsker Dü, Sonic Youth, the Meat Puppets, Dinosaur Jr., the Replacements, Violent Femmes, Camper Van Beethoven, and the Pixies, to name a few.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“My friend, Randy Ensley (’85), aka “Slomo,” loved classic rock of the 60’s and 70’s and had less appreciation for the new music coming out.  When I knew he was listening to my show, I’d use the two turntables to blend a portion of Led Zepplin into a Smiths song, or segue some Pink Floyd into the bridge of an R.E.M. song.  I’m not sure that I did too much to further my “college rock” cause, but it kept us amused at the time.”

Where was the station located when you went to Dickinson?

“Descending the circular staircase in the HUB, you’d make a right and it was straight ahead.  In the backroom there were thousands of LPs – a treasure trove – but I mostly brought my own in a milk crate.”

Christine Olinick Lowry ‘87

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“It took place near dinner time once a week. Whenever we started broadcasting, the Holland Union Building speakers would be turned off.  I remember it was very popular with the local prison and we would get requests from there.  We played all the popular Hard Rock/Metal of the time and my co-DJ would wheel his albums in a kid’s wagon over to the station because DCV did not have the appropriate material.  I think we were also one of the first to play Guns and Roses on the radio. The station had received an advanced copy of their first album and we enjoyed playing it.  On our final show we played a song by WASP that pushed the envelope, but it was a fun farewell.”

 

Jeannie Gabardine Thatcher ‘88

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“House on Pooh Corner, Tuesdays and Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to noon”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a freshman and a friend of mine from Phi Psi had a show, couldn’t do it at the last minute and asked me to fill in.  Talk about learning as you go!   It was a lucky break because I had a show all four years.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Only that I loved every second of it. It was back in the day when you brought your own albums along with using what the station had. It was great running into people who said, I heard your show today and I loved that song ….. I had a following albeit a small one.”

 

Ed Weber ‘89

Photo from 1980(ish)

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I had a two-hour time slot. I had a friend that had a time slot adjacent to mine. We were both Who fans. One week we took all four hours and played nothing but back-to-back Who songs. We even played different versions of the same song one right after the other. The weirdest thing we did was put the same record on two different turntables and played them at the same time. It created quite a strange stereo effect. I’m not sure how much our listeners cared for our creativity.”

Some Colleges have sold their broadcast licenses in recent years.  We are grateful Dickinson still supports us and cares about College Radio.  Do you think college radio is still important?  Tell us why!

“I think it is important because it gives an independent creative outlet, and allows students to decide what types of music and information is broadcast on campus and in Carlisle.”

 

David Brower ‘89

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I don’t remember giving my shows names.  I did the standard rotation shows in the evenings.  One year I hosted The Cumberland County Revue Sunday mornings.  I remember Davis Tracy calling me one morning with a compliment on the bluegrass I was playing at the time.”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I was a DJ and then spent 2 years as Music Director, or some would say Music Dictator.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I loved hanging out at the station and opening the mail.  We’d get so many great and important records.  We also had fun booking concerts to put on at ATS.  We had a constant fight against the group that booked lame big name bands.  I fondly remember one of our young DJs doing a cookout outside Kline center during the Eddie Money show.  He gave away free hot dogs to anyone that was NOT going to the concert.   That was the year I couldn’t find $250 to book the Indigo Girls to play at the snar.”

 

Tom Ciglar ‘89

What was your involvement with WDCV?

“I started doing shows with a friend in 1987. He had a lunch time oldies show. I started doing my own show in the winter of 1988 and I guess you would have called it “college rock”, though I did occasionally fill in for one or two of the metal shows.”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“No secrets, but I do remember helping set up some station id’s with guests at Dickinson, Abby Hoffman being one of them. Also remember one of dj’s being on a semester abroad in England and seeing Billy Bragg on the street in London, accosting him with a tape recorder and coaching him through a station id right there on the street. 

Getting to see the Ramones in Baltimore on comp tickets so that we could interview their opening band. I don’t remember the opener’s name, they never made it big, and the Ramones wanted nothing to do with us, but still I got to see the Ramones live. 

Some of the radio staff got a little tired of quality of the spring concerts in those days so we started a music production company of our own and brought bands to campus for smaller shows. We weren’t much of a financial success, but we did bring some great groups to campus. I remember Fugazi, Kingface, the Cynics, and a number of others playing ATS. It was great to be part of it.”

 

Erika DeCree ‘89

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Caffeine Express – Tues. & Thurs 6-8am  1986-87, Sunshine Daydreams – Wed 2-4pm 1987-88”

What was your involvement with WDCV?

WDCV Shirt Logo Late 80s/Early 90s

“Started Spring of Freshman year (1986) as an intern for Seniors Janice Rowley 7 Helen Seaman. Personnel Director 1986-87 semesters.

It was all about the music all the time!”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“When the Class Officers/Senate selected Eddie Money for the Spring Concert, there was a velvet revolution at DCV.  Several of us, appalled by the uninspired selection, played Eddie Money ad nauseum.  The campus was sick of him before he ever got to the Kline Center.  Eddie then berated the student body, from the stage, for not “showing up”.  It was basically supported by the Carlisle locals.”

 

A People’s History of WDCV ’70-’74 – the FCC saga and blast to FM

February 5th 1971 WDCV Schedule

February 5th 1971 WDCV Schedule

Thanks to these wonderful folks for telling us their stories!
Earl Douple ’71, Richard Mohrfeld ’71

Gary Toller ’72, John Englander ’72, Jerry Edling ’72, Susan Brubaker Innes ’72

Rich Wilson ’73, Fred Birnbaum ’73, Pete Taft ’73

David Johnson ’74, Stephen Meyer ’74, Larry Kovnat ’74

When we asked for stories from our Alums we were hoping to connect stories like this but we weren’t sure what we would get. The early 70’s were a time of great change at WDCV as we transitioned from AM to FM….all under the looming threat of an FCC shutdown.  John Englander gave us a little story during our 50th anniversary of his memory but we were able to let him know that in actually, his name is THE name on all of these documents from the FCC thanks to the Dickinson Archives preserving so much of our history. He was quite surprised to realize that he was so crucial in such a high level federal investigation. But like all things…..WDCV persevered thanks these alums. Although some crazy things were happening the shows were still going on and here are some stories from those who lived it. Thanks for sharing. Alums, you still can give us your memories to add to the People’s History of WDCV!

Earl Douple ’71

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

The Disco Show with Discophonic a/k/a Disco Douple. 10 to midnight. Started as a news reader freshman year, was Station Manager CY1969 and CY1970

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“We were 640AM at the time. Bob Wallace was Program Director, John Englander, Ad Manager, Alex Cavalli, Chief Engineer, Jeff Mohler, Sports Director, Ed Lichtenstein, News Director, and Dennis Fortune, Treasurer. My predecessor was Rick Kolb.”

Richard Mohrfeld ’71

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Did not have a show, built new station when moved from the music building attic to HUB. We were still carrier current with am transmitters in most dorms. Started with Jim Scharf and George Thomas in the egg crate studio.”

Any parting thoughts?

“College radio is a unique small voice that can sometimes roar.”

Gary Toller ’72

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“DJ 1969-1972 News, weather, and music, usually late night (various time slots). Played whatever I wanted and took requests.”

Any parting thoughts?

“College radio remains important because its number one focus is to serve the college community. It provides broadcast and engineering experience to the students involved. It provides the forum to discuss issues and present college sports coverage of interest to its listeners. It covers local cultural programming and informs the community of local upcoming events. Back in the era of my involvement, it did all this without commercial interruption. 

WDCV has come a long way. It’s broadcast power has increased at least 10-fold since my era and I’ll bet the equipment has gone through several major upgrades. A complete history should also provide information about the changing technology.”

John Englander ’72
WDCV Experience/Show

“Think I started in Freshman year 68/69. Worked as DJ, announcer, and advertising. Was in Management position by senior year (72), but frankly don’t recall title. On Executive Board. “

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I was in some senior management position at WDCV by graduation in 1972 — but frankly can’t recall the title. The strongest memory was rather a secret. Not sure if it is now known, or should be made known. I will leave that to your discretion. We were broadcasting over the power lines on campus using the FCC’s limited power category, whatever that was called.The FCC notified us one day that they was a complaint from the local radio station that our signal was “leaking” beyond the campus and overpowering the commercial broadcast stations in some areas of the campus. I went out with our Technical / Engineering director to do a little study of our own. It was true. Somehow the power lines on campus were REALLY radiating our signal. We did not have a quick fix, but the FCC said they were sending an Inspector in the near future.

We were nervous about being shut down. At the announced date, the FCC guy showed up and I was the one who joined him on his inspection. Really nice guy. Had his analog tuner / signal strength monitor box in his hands (long before digital gadgets). We chatted about the complaint and how our system worked, before he said we should walk around the campus. I was really nervous. I am not sure whether the possible penalty was a serious fine, or just shutting us down, but it was ominous.

We got outside. He started looking for the station twirling this circular dials on this old style, but sophisticated tuner. He was looking for our station. As I recall he scanned through the dial and I heard our station blaring at some multiple of our frequency which was 710 — probably the harmonic was 1420. The needle on his machine jumped WAY high as he passed that frequency. I was sure he was going to nail us. I had visions of the station being shut down and fines. He made some comment, like “wonder who that is” but then proceeded to try to find us at 710. Down at our frequency we were a little over the limit too, and he told me we had to get it under control. What he didn’t realize was that the big problem was the harmonic. We struggled to find the technical solution over the next few months. Tim R___ was our technical director. He figured that the signal was looping somehow in the power wires in the dorms. We bought some large ferite doughnut type things to go over the power lines to try to correct the problem. Even getting those installed was a big deal. Frankly I can’t remember exactly how it all was resolved. But the station continued on the air, and we did enough things to get through the issue. But it was very stressful at the time.”

Jerry Edling ’72

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“My first show was from 12:00 P.M. until 2:00 P.M. on Thursdays, after which I had to sprint to a 2:00 Biology lab class in Dana Hall. After I became a member of the executive staff I had a show from 11:00 P.M. until 2:00 A.M.

I had a show and worked on the news staff during my freshman year. (I traveled to New York in November of 1968 to cover election night at Nixon headquarters.) I became Campus News Director in September of my sophomore year, News Director that December and Program Director the following April. I held two jobs (Production Manager and News Director) beginning in December of my junior year.

Worked with : Stephen J. Simpson (’73), Robert W. Wallace (’71), John Englander (’72), Hal German (’72), David James (’74), Dave Johnson (’74), William (“Tripp”) Martin III (’72), Ken Baker (’74), Alan Myers (’72) and Paul Nickerson (’72).”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“During the fall of 1969, as the U.S. was involved in the Vietnam War, the nation held its first draft lottery. It was very much like the multi-million dollar lotteries of the present day. 366 pieces of paper with the days of the year written on them were mixed in a shoebox and dumped in a glass bowl in Washington, DC. They were then drawn out one by one, and the order of drawing determined the order in which men of eligible draft age would be called to serve in Vietnam. There was no such thing as CNN, MSNBC or Fox News in those days, so WDCV’s teletype was virtually the only source of information on the numbers drawn. We decided to do a special program broadcasting the numbers as they were drawn. Hal German (’72) created a promo for the show using the song “Birthday” by the Beatles as background. Needless to say, the show garnered one of the largest tune-in audiences in the history of the station. Just about everyone at Dickinson was listening, and people mobbed the station in the basement of the Holland Union Building for information. (We posted a list of the numbers as they were drawn.)

One anecdote we’d all like to forget was the time one of the disc jockeys said something like this on the air: “Wouldn’t it be nice if President Nixon announced to the nation that he was withdrawing all U.S. troops from Vietnam?” Some people missed the first part of what he said and thought the President had actually announced it. People who heard it in the Snack Bar ran screaming with joy through the Holland Union Building. I think the student who made the blunder was fired that night.

That same year, students organized a march past the U.S. Army War College. At the time, the station ran at least one major half-hour newscast every weekday at 11:00. (I think we did a 7:00 newscast at one time as well.) Hal, Bob Wallace (’71) and I were among the station personnel who covered it. (Bob also fed reports to WIOO, for which he worked part time.) The following year, the shooting at Kent State and the U.S. incursion into Cambodia prompted another march and a student strike. The protest began with a march past the U.S. Army War College to a vacant lot, where there were some speeches. On the way back to the college one contingent marched onto the grounds of the Carlisle Barracks. They were met by a well-disciplined force of about a dozen soldiers carrying nightsticks, who arrayed themselves across the entrance. The chaplain of the U.S. Army War College came out and successfully defused the standoff by organizing some discussion groups on the lawn. (The standing joke then became that Dickinson was incapable of causing a riot; everything always ended in discussion groups.) WDCV covered it all. As I recall, we covered the emergency meeting of the student body, at which we voted to strike, live on the air; and the station was manned 24 hours a day after students occupied the Holland Union Building and other buildings on campus.

When I started at WDCV in 1968 it was a Top 40 station. It changed to album rock in either 1969 or 1970. There were a number of specialty shows as well, including classical programming with Neil Ross on Sunday mornings and a daily soul show, including “blue-eyed soul” with Paul Nickerson (’72), from 5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. on weekdays. During my junior and senior years Dave Johnson (’74), who had worked professionally in Kane, PA (his home town), hosted a very popular oldies show. One night he broadcast it live from Theta Chi (his fraternity) at a party that was open to all students.

One final anecdote. Ken Baker (’74) used to engineer some of our extended newscasts. His job was to introduce the anchors and play the carts with the news actualities in order. He engineered from Studio A, and the news and sports anchors sat in the news booth. From where he stood he could see through the window to Studio B, where there were three lights. If the red light was lit, Studio B was on the air; if the amber light was lit, Studio A was on the air; and if the white light was lit, a Wollensak tape recorder (which we used to play music tapes when no one was manning the station) was on the air. We decided to play a joke on Ken. We pre-recorded a ten minute interview; and then H. Stephen Miller, who I believe was station manager at the time, rewired the three lights so that Ken would think his studio was on the air when it actually wasn’t. We secretly started the interview on the Wollensak and then told the news and sports anchors to take the newscast into a complete downward spiral. They laughed, made deliberate mistakes and turned the show into a complete farce. Ken though it was all going out over the air, but it wasn’t. His face turned beet red as he tried to regain control of the newscast, and he was screaming through the intercom at the anchors to behave.

In reality, it was a flawless newscast. “

Any parting thoughts?

“It is true that in the era of the Internet anyone can broadcast to the world, but there is something exclusive and spontaneous about radio that cannot be replicated online. Radio isn’t lost in the clutter. It’s distinctive, and it forces its practitioners to perform at a certain level. WDCV had a major impact on my life and career choice. I hope WDCV-FM has an impact on generations to come.”

Susan Brubaker Innes ’72

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“I did not have a Radio Show. I was a News Announcer for five News Slots a week. “

“I worked at WDCV from my second week of College my Freshman Year September of 1968 to the week after I graduated in May of 1972. I started as an Assistant Editor for the News and I was named to a full Editors Spot in May of my Sophomore Year in 1970. Editors were required to serve on the Board. I reported to the station in time to edit, compile and write international, national, local and campus news. I conducted live interviews. I sold advertising. I coordinated the Campus and Community On-line Announcements and Public Service Announcements. “

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I have wonderful memories of our WDCV Staff. We were all very close to each other and we all worked very hard to make WDVC the best that it could be. 1968 to 1972 was an exciting and turbulent time on campus. We covered every aspect and every point of view of the Fight for Racial Justice, Freedom, and Equality, the fight for Women’s Rights, Migrant Workers Rights and Treatment, the Vietnam War Protests, the SDS, the Black Panthers, Child and Elder Abuse, the development of Chemical Warfare, the safety of Three Mile Island and other Nuclear facilities, the Climate Crisis, the need for Cleaner Food and sustainability, Drugs and Health, and so many other issues. “

Any Parting Thoughts?

“Leslie Scott ( married name Kraus) was WDVC’s Weather Girl from 1968 to 1971. She had flaming red hair and was famous for her soft, sultry voice and perfect diction. Her voice was like silk. People tuned in just to hear her read the Weather. Leslie was from Mechanicsburg, PA and lived in Rye, New York. She worked in the History Department at Dickinson College then at the Council on the Humanities for the State of Pennsylvania. She was the Director of Patroon Relations for the Philadelphia Opera Company, The Mark Twain Foundation in Hartford, Connecticut, and later for SUNY Purchase. Leslie passed away in 2021 and is missed by her Dickinson Friends. “

March 9th 1973

March 9th 1973

Rich Wilson ’73

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

Wow, I don’t know. It was 50 years ago! LOL It was in the evening, probably late like 8-midnight or something. I don’t remember anybody having a name for a show, but maybe some did. My nickname on campus was The Bear. It’s possible I used that on air, maybe as an identifier for my show, but I don’t recall. I would have used my actual name, too.

What was your involvement with WDCV?
I think it was sometime in Spring or Fall 1972. I did not do sports or news. On my show I played album cuts — progressive rock, folk etc. I was occasionally asked to do voice work for student projects.

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?”

WDCV was still on AM when I got involved with the station in 1972. By a quirk of fate, this happened to be right around the same time that Dickinson was getting in trouble with the FCC for the radio station having too strong a signal.

So, just as I was about to begin my college radio career, there were big changes. This signal-strength contretemps spurred the college to apply to the FCC for a low-power FM license. With this new license came a caveat: all on-air staff would now be required to have a minimum FCC third-class radiotelephone license (what people in the biz referred to as a “third phone”).

To get a third phone, you had to take a test that was, at the time, somewhat rigorous. The test covered basic electronics, radio propagation concepts, and some legal stuff. I don’t recall all the specifics, but I do remember: this was not information most students at a typical liberal arts college would know.

Somebody back then published a little study guide with a practice test, and some clever person at the station made sure that we all got a copy. Those of us who planned to take the test really did have to use that guide, and put some effort into preparing. It had sample tests that showed you just how little you knew about the world of broadcasting.

The nearest FCC office is in Philadelphia, so a bunch of us jammed into cars and drove down to take the test. I spent at least part of the ride reviewing that study guide, one more time.

At the FCC office, we were going into the testing room when a contingent from another college arrived. I’ve decided not to name them here because I do not want to make fun of them. I’ll just say, it was a state college in the Philadelphia region. They had arrived with the same goal we had.

One of our group had some kind of issues and had to start over. But most of us finished quickly and sat in the waiting area while the other school’s students went in for their tests. The FCC staff started scoring the tests right away. Before long, we found that we had all passed.

Our slowpoke was still in the testing room as the other school’s students came out and waited. By the time he finally emerged, the FCC staff was already giving them their test results.

Every time I think back to this episode, I tell myself that my memory must be wrong, that I’m exaggerating. But what I recall is that none of the students from the state college passed the test that day.

I was never good enough to play organized sports, but on this day I allowed myself to enjoy a sense of competition, as if we had just won the GE College Bowl on TV. The Dickinson banner that day was borne not by athletes, but by the radio nerds.

The point of the story is not to knock those other kids, nor their school. It was more a point of pride for me, that the Dickinsonians had taken the challenge seriously, and – maybe – demonstrated that our SAT scores and selective admissions actually represented something.

Especially: an enhanced ability to learn new things, in unfamiliar fields of study.

EPILOGUE: Within 20 years, the FCC had decided that people operating radio stations did not need to know what they were doing. They did away with the Third Phone license and its test. But in the early 70s, that license helped me get jobs in professional radio, where it was – irony of ironies – more important to management than my college degree! So, thanks to WDCV-FM, and to whoever complained to the FCC and indirectly made that license test necessary. It enabled my employment when I graduated, in the depths of a recession. And, to quote Robert Frost, “that has made all the difference.”

Any parting thoughts?

“For me, radio was a stepping stone to TV, video, and film. I’ve been to grad school along the way and studied media from many angles. This is the most important thing I’ve learned: choose your information sources very, very carefully. Americans are huge consumers of media from myriad sources – but they are not discerning or selective enough. Our society is at great risk right now, and our addiction to unfiltered, unedited media content is tearing us apart. Conversely, broadcasters and other media creators should take their responsibility seriously, to be as truthful as possible. Try to become the dependable source in a sea of misinformation and confusion, that your listeners can rely on for honesty and fairness.”

Fred Birnbaum ’73

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“The Tony Burns Show 1969-70 (Top 40) Sat AM I Can See for Miles – Progressive (Classic) Rock show (the first music show with no playlist at WDCV)- 1970-73 – various times, usually evenings. 1969. Became programming manager in 1972-3. “

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“I have many stories I could relate about my experiences at WDCV. The first time I had a show was a 7-10 AM show on Saturday mornings. There is still a question in my mind if anyone but the food service people ever heard that show. This was the beginning of the time when FM progressive rock shows with themes, soft-spoken DJ’s that the discussed the music- it’s history, lyrics and the bands playing it began.

My show, once I managed to talk the conservative AM-top 40 management into letting me do this, was modeled after those in Philly like Michael Tierson’s Marconi Experiment and WDAS-FM Sunday eves. I would bring in various students who were ahead of the curve as to new Rock bands to discuss the new bands, while I moderated. I would do theme shows with songs that followed a pattern- like songs with the word “Sun” in it. I always started my show with a theme song, “I can see for miles” by the Who so that people would know that my show was starting when they heard it. I also used it in promos when I would air specials like an entire show on the Grateful Dead.

As the music evolved, more shows like mine were being aired, and the day of the playlist was at an end. Bringing in more and more new music got our student concert promoter involved and it lead to concerts being held at Dickinson- first in the cafeteria and then in the then brand new Anita Tuvin_Schlecter auditorium in the round. The first band who played there was an up-and-coming band called Yes.

As the music spread into jazz, more people became aware of the Jazz-Rock fusion music which probably began with Miles Davis album called “Bitches’ Brew” which spun off Chick Corea and Return to Forever, Herbie Hancock Group, Stanley Calark Band, Al DeMeola and John McLaughlin who, along with Billy Cobham formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra.

We brought the Mahavishnu Orchestra to Dickinson in spring 1972 and people were blown away by the music. I thoroughly enjoyed myself during my time at WDCV during those heady years, and hope today’s radio station still permits the same freedom of expression for it’s DJs (or whatever they are called nowadays).”

Pete Taft ’73

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

No name, but had the 6-8AM slot, as I recall, a couple weekdays. Involvement: Just a simple jock.

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Got a call from the then-station manager (in the middle of the show) telling me it was the best new show he’d heard from a freshman! (Maybe he told everyone!). Anyway, fast forward a bit and I was offered, I think sophomore year, a low-level jock position at a small Harrisburg station. I turned it down: No car! And D’son was more fun. One more: A friend and I first heard Monty Python’s first album in the studios, as a record was playing. We stared at each other and said, ‘What on earth is this?!'”

Any parting thoughts?

“I will never, ever forget the station’s signoff (midnight?) tape: Then-President Howard Rubendall singing “Noble Dickinsonia” (recorded at an event, close mic) and garbling the lyrics into a hilarious mishmash. All you could hear clearly was “Noble Dickinsonia.” Now, Bud Rubendall was, in fact, a great man and a great president. But not a great singer!”

 

May 10, 1974

May 10, 1974

David Johnson ’74

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Oldies Request Show, Fridays, 11 p.m. – 2 a.m. The evening news, 6:30-7 p.m. Oldies request show, news director, broadcast basketall games”

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“WDCV was a very large part of my life at Dickinson. In fact, it was probably one of the biggest drawing cards to come to Dickinson since the station was much more advanced than the commercial station at which I had worked throughout high school– WKZA, Kane, PA, now out of existence. “

Stephen Meyer ’74

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Oldies Request Show, 10PM-Midnight, Friday, following Dave Johnson portion of same format. We also did a live broadcast from Theta Chi fraternity house for the entire Dickinson community once a semester. 1973; mostly as a newscaster. Lengthy evening newscasts. “

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Probably have old cassette tapes of the Oldies Show stashed away somewhere.”

Larry Kovnat ’74

What was the name of your radio show and what time slot did it air?

“Don’t remember if I named the show. I wasn’t very good. That’s why they made me program director for two years. Steve Simpson (class of ’73) and Phil Wirth were program directors. David James was Music Director. Barry Kresch (’75) followed him. We were the board that converted the station from closed circuit AM to broadcast FM. 10 watts – woo hoo! I even got my FCC 2nd class license. I also remember the previous crowd, mostly class of ’72 graduates, mostly Jerry Edling and Ed Lichtenstein. “

Do you have any stories, memories or secrets related to WDCV that you would like to share with us?

“Yes, but this was 1972. We were still getting draft numbers. Not sure how much I can share without talking to the others ;)”

 

WDCV-FM 60th Anniversary!

Anniversary collageHello WDCV Alumni!

WDCV is celebrating its 60th anniversary. As a part of that celebration we would love to hear from and reconnect with alumni. We are inviting alumni to come visit us on Homecoming and Family weekend (September 23-25). On the 24th at 3-5 pm we plan to have an Open House of our station, t-shirts, a place to record alumni stories, and of course, music! Can’t make it? That’s okay. We would love it if you could record some memories from your time as a WDCV. Little stories that would be lost otherwise. It doesn’t have to be anything grand, but if it’s something you remember, it must have been important enough to stick in your memory so why not share it. Even the ones that might have been more secretive are welcome. 

Fill out our Alumni Survey and you can write out any memories or we have a space to drop in an audio story. 

Alumni Survey

While we have a list of WDCV alums, we may not have a list of everyone. Please pass on this letter to any WDCV alums you are aware of.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfchH633V7ChKoppMQ9lVXoqUqic3YNdtEjVpipypA_lzG-yA/viewform 

We have a list of alums that have been identified as listing WDCV as one of their activities, but we surely are missing people who we would love to reconnect with.  If you know of other WDCV alums, we would be grateful if you would pass this information their way so we can gather as much WDCV goodness that we possibly can. 

We hope you will stay in touch with WDCV through our website wdcvfm.com & our Facebook and Twitter pages. 

Also, if you have pictures or other memorabilia that you would like to share with us we would be very thankful.  You can either send digital images of pictures or documents or if you want to donate originals to our archives please mail them to us. We would love audio of old shows or just you recording a story or Station ID for us.  If you have problems getting any of these items to us, let us know, we will find a way to help!

Thank you,

WDCV Exec Board

Contact Us!

wdcvfm@gmail.com

 

WDCV-FM

Dickinson College

PO Box 1773

Carlisle Pa 17013

Under Milk Wood with the Dickinson College Department of Theatre and Dance

This past weekend, WDCV had the chance to collaborate with the Dickinson College Department of Theatre and Dance on their spring show. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the theatre and dance department decided to take this semester’s production online with the radio drama, Under Milk Wood. See below for a short synopsis of the play:

“Under Milk Wood tells the gentle story of a day in the life of a small seaside village in Wales, beginning with the first rustlings of pre-dawn and continuing until all in the village rest in the arms of nightfall. In this unique radio broadcast, the characters of the village are brought to life by a cast of over thirty voice actors composed of current Dickinson students and Dickinson alumni guest artists.”

Although originally aired on WDCV on March 5th and 6th, you can listen to the recording at your leisure by clicking the play button below.

CREDITS:
The Dickinson College Department of Theatre and Dance

Technical assistance & help: Kent Barrett, Taylor Garrett

Concert Review: AJR’s One Spectacular Night

by Amy Soba ’21

On Saturday, December 26th, AJR hosted their first full livestreamed concert. I’m not normally a big fan of livestreamed concerts, but this was something different. It was hosted on VENEWLIVE which presents a more interactive interface than Facebook or Instagram Live. For example, the viewer can rotate between different camera angles and chat with other audience members. Viewers can also cheer, stomp, and applause which are played at the end of each song. Fun fact – AJR themselves created the cheering sound effects! (see their TikTok or Instagram for more @ajrbrothers).

 

I’ve been to two AJR concerts, one for The Click and one for Neotheater. Both times I was absolutely blown away by the level of dedication and creativity the brothers show to their music and to their audience. Thus, I was really intrigued to see how they would pull off a virtual concert experience.

 

The show started out with a FANTASTIC overture containing pieces from AJR’s entire discography. As a big AJR fan, I was a little sad that they did not include an overture on their Neotheater album like they did on Living Room and The Click, so, to me, this was the perfect way to kick off the night. The band played through a good portion of their Neotheater album while also throwing in some bigger hits like “Weak,” “Sober Up,” “Burn the House Down,” and (perhaps their biggest hit yet) “Bang!” They also debuted a new song, “My Play,” which will be part of their upcoming album OK ORCHESTRA.

 

Just like with any in-person concert, there were also tons of lighting effects like strobe lights and laser beams in addition to the songs themselves. Similar to their Neotheater tour, AJR also used a giant projector screen which Jack, the lead singer, interacted with. However, I think the coolest stunt they did was having Jack suspended mid-air with wires and making it look like he was walking on a laser beam. In a way, I think certain visual effects could have only worked in this virtual setting, as you would have had to look at the stage from just the right angle to make the effect look real. That’s what I really like about AJR. They took this virtual concert space and were like, “Okay, the audience can’t really be there, so how do we make this an experience worth watching and how can we take advantage of this virtual setting?”

AJR performs “My Play”

 

 

One of my favorite moments of the night was when Ryan broke down the production of “Bang!” AJR does a song breakdown in every concert they do, so it’s always fun to guess which one will be featured. “Bang!” was a little tougher to guess than past ones because it honestly sounds like a standard pop song until you hear that tell-tale marching / swinging rhythm and trumpets. I loved how Ryan started with the simple, everyday sound of a door knock, and added in elements piece by piece until he created a whole song. It was like watching them produce a song right in front of us.* 

 

*if you’re into music production or really love song breakdowns,  I highly suggest checking out AJR’s Youtube channel where Ryan opens up their ProTools setup and breaks down acouple of different songs.  

 

All in all, AJR’s One Spectacular Night was indeed spectacular. While nothing can be the same as moshing to “Weak” with hundreds of other people, the band did a fantastic job putting together and performing a virtual show. Everything from the song selection to the visual effects to the stunts was completely captivating and I’m really glad I decided to go.

 

If you’re looking for the latest from AJR, check out “My Play” and make sure to keep an ear out for their upcoming album, OK ORCHESTRA, which drops March 26th, 2021.

 

Find AJR on Spotify!

All featured photos are from AJR’s Instagram @ajrbrothers

A Reflection on Remote Radio

From the perspective of a station manager

Photo credit: Amy Soba ’21

 

The fall semester has come to an end and what a crazy one it’s been. I remember walking out of the station in March thinking “I’ll be back soon. It’s just spring break.” Boy, was I wrong. One week turned into two weeks and then a month, and then a whole summer which blurred into a remote fall semester. I was definitely let down. I thought, “Wow, I’m a senior and one of my last memories of the station will be sitting on the couch watching Barry – wild.” Little did I know that radio could continue on from the oh-so-familiar four walls of my room. I called a meeting with the other station manager, our faculty advisor, and our technical engineer. We were able to brainstorm four pretty good ideas which we then pitched to the rest of exec and the DJs. One of the ideas – prerecorded shows – really caught on. We ended up with about 24 active student and community DJs, which I think is pretty amazing. I was able to record a show on Friday night and have it air on Tuesday, which was convenient.. The prerecorded format also gave me space to try talking more “on-air” and add in more fun facts about the artists or personal anecdotes about a particular song. Our exec board also hosted a few Zoom hangouts, game nights, and even pulled off our semesterly 24 Hour Live event.

 

The spring semester offers a whole new set of challenges with Dickinson’s plan to flip the on-campus student body halfway through the semester. I’m hoping to have more live DJs in the station with proper cleaning protocols in place along with continuing remote radio for those who are at home. In an ideal world, I would love to see a socially distanced Live on Britton once it warms up in April/May. With 2020 almost over, I’m definitely ready to look towards the new year. I’m sure I won’t wake up January 1st, 2021 with all of my problems solved, but if this year has shown me anything, it’s that people can be really creative in coming up with ways to keep moving forwards. All in all, I’m very impressed with how radio has fared and I’m curious to see what next semester holds.

 

by Amy Soba ’21

Album Review: Hurts Being Alive by Down Time

Artist: Down Time

Album: Hurts Being Alive

Genre: Indie

Hometown: Denver, CO

Track Listing (* – recommended tracks):

  1. Other Side*
  2. Take Me To A Place
  3. Hurts Being Alive*
  4. Not A Complicated Person*
  5. Star
  6. No Sentiment
  7. Blank Stare
  8. Despite
  9. Doubt
  10. There It Goes

Songs with profanity: #1, #5, #7

Recommended if you like: Frankie Cosmos, Snail Mail, Lomelda

Label: Self-released

Reviewed by: Lil Macchiato

Album Review: Man Alive! by King Krule

Artist: King Krule

Album: Man Alive!

Genre: Alternative, Lofi

Hometown: London, England

Track Listing (* – recommended tracks):

  1. Cellular*
  2. Supermarché
  3. Stoned Again
  4. Comet Face
  5. The Dream
  6. Perfecto Miserable
  7. Alone, Omen 3*
  8. Slinky
  9. Airport Antenatal Airplane
  10. (Don’t Let the Dragon) Draag On
  11. Theme for the Cross
  12. Underclass
  13. Energy Fleets*
  14. Please Complete Thee

Songs with profanity: #2, #3

Recommended if you like: Cosmo Pyke, Ariel Pink, Blood Orange, Homeshake

Label: Matador Records

Reviewed by: Lil Macchiato

Interview with Dr. Ruth Westheimer

This year, the Poitras Gleim Lecture guest was Dr. Ruth Westheimer. The lecture honors people who’ve made significant cultural contributions to media and popular culture, and this year Dickinson was pleased to have Dr. Ruth. She’s best known for being the sex therapist on American broadcast media, alongside many other things such as being a Holocaust survivor, Israeli military member and more.

Our interview with her discussed a lot about her general career, and her own reflections of life at age 92! WDCV can proudly say Dr. Ruth gave us glowing reviews for our interview and she enjoyed it very much, which we take as high praise since she’s done radio far longer than our station members.

CREDITS:
Interviewers: Rosey Pasco & Nuhan B. Abid

Technical assistance & help: Brenda Landis, Taylor Garrett

The BEST Halloween Playlists you have never heard of, until now

Aquarium Drunkard. Bookmark it. Put it on your daily reads list. Educate yourself on all sorts of awesome music that isn’t on commercial radio (but we play on WDCV!). Their vintage mixtapes are the stuff of legend. Perfectly crafted finds from scratchy records that might have languished in a forgotten box in your neighbors basement but these expert diggers source, curate, and share these gems for all of our benefit.

My favorite ones are the Trick or Treat Mixtapes filled with a focus on 60’s garage and surf rock monster tunes but other vintage gems are peppered in there. You won’t hear Monster Mash but I promise you will hear tunes you wish you heard before today. I can only find volumes 5-9 online and if you can find me 1-4 I will forever be in your debt.

They have 7-9 still posted and 5 and 6 links straight to a sketchy download site.  So, for your trick or treat bag I have downloaded all 5-9 for your enjoyment and also because they keep removing the old ones and I don’t want them to disappear forever. 

If you like these I highly recommend their other holiday mixtapes “Lit up like a Christmas Tree Vol. 1 and 2′ And “Christmas Jambree :: A Vintage Jamaican Yuletide Mixtape”.  Really, just use this link to search any post with the term ‘mixtape’ in it and you are likely to stumble upon the best treasure trove of downloadable vintage jams you never knew were missing from your life until now. 

I’m also a fan of the Bomboclat! Island Soak series.  Really, you can’t go wrong on any of these mixtapes.  Happy listening!