Breminale 2021

© Ingrid Krause / BTZ Bremer Touristik-Zentrale

After the Breminale – Bremen’s annual music festival at the river Weser – had to be suspended last year due to the pandemic, the people of Bremen and everyone around can again look forward to 5 days full of music and other entertainment.

This year, however, with a slight twist: This summer, Bremen’s music festival runs under the name “Breminale  – Dezentrale” (a phonetical wordplay – Dezentrale can be translated here as “decentralized”). Normally, the festival always takes place at the Osterdeich, directly next to the Weser, where every year a very long festival site is built. But this year, in order to comply with the COVID hygiene measures, the various acts take place in different places throughout the city.

What makes the festival so special is that it appeals to all age groups through its varied program, so that the whole city of Bremen can come together.

So finally again this year, from July 21 to July 25, 2021, the city of Bremen gets to enjoy a wide and diverse creative program filled with many different musical genres and bands from and outside of Bremen, which can be found here: https://breminale-festival.de/programm?tag=mittwoch

 

50 Years of University of Bremen

© GfG / Gruppe für Gestaltung

This year marks the 50th birthday of the University of Bremen. To celebrate half a century of Uni Bremen, the university offers a wide range of various events throughout the year.

The “50 reasons WHY” exhibition (in German: “WARUM? DARUM.”) throughout 50 different locations in Bremen, which started in March and will close in August, displays all of the achievements of people from and with the University of Bremen as well as where the Uni is involved and how it has changed Bremen since 1971. As of October, the exhibition will be brought together in the Lower Town Hall.

The fall program involves a wide range of research and teaching topics under the headline “CAMPUS CITY” which is scheduled from October 14, 2021 – 50 years to the day after the university was founded. More information about CAMPUS CITY will follow soon.

Moreover, Uni Bremen has set up the project “#IchBinUniBremen” (in English: “#IAmUniBremen”) in order to present the ‘human side’ of the University of Bremen: 50 different individuals affiliated with the University of Bremen give personal insights into its past, present and future. The project page and its social media sites can be found here:

https://www.uni-bremen.de/50-jahre/programm/projekte/ichbinunibremen

https://www.instagram.com/ichbinunibremen/

 

Further information about 50 Years of University of Bremen can be found here:

https://www.uni-bremen.de/en/university/university-communication-and-marketing/all-news/details/for-the-city-and-society-50-years-of-university-of-bremen

https://www.uni-bremen.de/en/university/university-communication-and-marketing/all-news/details/darum-50-jahre-universitaet-bremen-zum-mitnehmen

When we will be able to travel again… Part III

Germany is opening up, and people are planning their vacation. We are hoping to explore sites and places with our students, rich in culture and history as well as vibrant and lively in the present. Here are some pictures from one of the trips we did to nearby Hamburg and Lübeck:

 

This video features the song “Happiness” by Bensound, available under a Creative Commons license.

When we will be able to travel again… Part II

by Dr. Janine Ludwig

Right now, things are looking much brighter with regard to the pandemic, and we are hopeful that we will be able to travel again at some point. We are looking forward to offering rich academic excursions for our students again, one of them to Vienna. The broader theme of this annual trip is German-Austrian history and culture from the Middle Ages until today.

In introductory lectures, we follow the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, from Charles the Great (800) to the Napoleonic conquests (1806). We track the Habsburg dynasty (1273-1918) and the Austro-Hungarian k.u.k Monarchy, later: Austrian Empire (1804-1918), overlapping with the German Empire (1871-1918). With this information, the students can better understand our tours and exhibits and grasp the importance of Vienna as a former political and cultural center of Europe. Additionally, we indulge in the imperial glamour and culinary abundance of this beautiful city.

In recent years, we have visited Mozart’s house, the Sigmund Freud Museum, castles, and the United Nations Office Vienna. We saw productions in the world-famous Viennese Burgtheater, the Volkstheater or the opera and indulged in traditional delicacies as well as in the famous coffee house culture.

Student’s comments:

“In Vienna, we learned a lot about the history of Austria and by extension Germany. My favorite part of the trip was learning about the Hapsburg dynasty, and visiting the castle in which they lived. I also enjoyed visiting Vienna’s many churches. One of my other favorite parts of the trip was the day in Bratislava. I knew basically nothing about Bratislava and Slovakia, and I enjoyed learning about the city and its history.” >James Moore ’20<

“What attracted me the most about Vienna was the vibe of the city. As a cultural center in Europe, Vienna has retained its historical memory and blended it with the bustle of modern society.” >Zhen Luo ‘18<

“Vienna has quickly become one of my favorite places in the world […] and within this gorgeous palace is the National Library. […] The best part of the tour for me was being able to see some selected books like a Gutenberg Bible up close and even touch it. My nerdy book-loving soul was close to exploding. The trip to the library was an absolute highlight of our trip for me.” >Meghan Straub ‘18<

Bremen’s Rhododendron-Park is in full bloom!

At the Rhododendronpark in Bremen, visitors get to enjoy one of the largest collection worldwide of these unusual, beautiful flowers: The park offers over 1,000 types of Rhododendron and Azalea bushes stretched over 46 hectares of parkland!

We highly recommend you to visit the park in the month of May: During this time of year, the Rhododendron starts to come into full bloom and shows its many vibrant colors.

If you already want to have a sneak-peak, check out the park’s 360° tour:

https://roundme.com/tour/598271/view/1915145/

For more information visit: https://www.rhododendronparkbremen.de/

Photo: Heinz-Josef Lücking, Creative Commons licence CC BY-SA 3.0 DE

Meet the people behind the Durden Dickinson Bremen Program: Leandra Thiele

Leandra Thiele holds a bachelor’s degree in English-Speaking Cultures and Linguistics from the University of Bremen and will soon complete her master’s degree in English-Speaking Cultures. She was an OSA (Overseas Student Assistant) in 2016-17 in the German Department at Dickinson College. For the Spring Semester 2021, she has returned to her old role as teaching assistant and is remotely teaching German 101 and 102 classes.

Leandra is also currently replacing the Dickinson-in-Bremen program coordinator Verena Mertz and is very happy to be back on the program.

She is looking much forward to be hopefully welcoming new Dickinsonians to the Uni Bremen campus in the fall!

Meet the people behind the Durden Dickinson Bremen Program: Antje Pfannkuchen, Ph.D.

Prof. Pfannkuchen arrived at Dickinson in 2009. After living in Berlin, NYC and London, Carlisle was a bit of a change, but by now (and especially during the pandemic) small-town living has grown on her. At the moment, though, she is on leave as a visiting scholar at Johns Hopkins University, finishing her manuscript “Printing the Invisible.” This book studies the beginnings of photography in the early 19th century and how they were connected to research in electricity and to romantic poetry.

Prof. Pfannkuchen came to German Studies indirectly after a first degree in “Kulturwissenschaften” (Cultural History) with a focus on media theories and a second master’s from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) exploring technological innovations. Her current work is informed by her continued interest in the media-technological state of our world. That’s why students in her courses with topics as diverse as “German-Jewish Culture,” “Goethe Forever!” or “The German Political Landscape” are taught to produce podcasts and videos, instead of merely consuming them.

Normally she is back in Germany at least twice every year with regular stays in Bremen, Berlin, and her hometown Dresden.

Meet the people behind the Durden Dickinson Bremen Program: Ann Hudson

Her interest is bringing the German and French speaking worlds to the elementary levels of the Dickinson classroom. Her specialty in second language acquisition is teaching not only how to communicate in both languages, but to also make connections and comparisons between our culture and the various communities of those worlds, so that the students will one day be able to use their target language(s) globally.

Meet the people behind the Durden Dickinson Bremen Program: Kamaal Haque, Ph.D.

“Servus!” Prof. Haque has been teaching at Dickinson since 2008. He teaches all levels of the curriculum. Some courses he regularly teaches include Mountains in German Culture, German Literature and Film of the First World War and German Intellectual History. His research focuses on the Alps in German-language film and literature. When he is in Europe, you can find him in Munich or the mountains of Germany, Austria and Northern Italy.  If he has to be somewhere flat, Bremen is a great place to be!