Experience Bremen at Home

View of the Market Square

Sunset at the Schlachte

“Would you like to discover the most beautiful corners of Bremen from home, visit our parlour from your couch or take a stroll through the winding Schnoor? Would you like to take a virtual tour of the museums and knowledge worlds or sail on the Weser?”

Famous Schnoor quarter

If so, then you should definitely take a look at the Visit Bremen website. There you will find lots of amazing videos, information, 360-degree tours of Bremen, as well a guided visit of the City Center. Pierre will take you on a tour of the Marktplatz square – known as Bremen’s ‘Gute Stube’ or ‘drawing room’. But what else can be found at the historic marketplace? Get ready for some surprises!

Further information can be found here: https://www.bremen.eu/tourism/bremen-at-home

And here: https://www.bremen.eu/tourism

Kathryn Baker’s Reflections on Studying Abroad in Bremen

by Kathryn Baker ’23

I studied abroad in Bremen for the full year. In that year I had some of the best times of my life and some challenging times. When I visited Munich back in 2016, I thought it was an amazing city and wanted to go to Germany again. In my first semester at Dickinson I started with German 101. When I found out there was a study abroad program in Germany, I told myself I must go. I had never even heard of the city of Bremen until I learned about the Dickinson in Bremen program. Fast forward 2 years later and I’m flying to Bremen! I struggled at first with all of the cultural differences, and I had a hard time figuring out how to work German household appliances (I may have broken the toaster). But after living in Bremen for a few months, I figured it all out. In my free time I explored every part of Bremen, and I fell in love with the city. I lived with 7 other students in a Wohngemeinschaft (WG), close to the most beautiful park in Bremen, the Bürgerpark. The majority of the students I lived with were German so I practiced my German with them and tried to understand what they were saying when they spoke fast. My flatmates and I became really good friends, and we went out together in Bremen many times. One of my flatmates even came along with my boyfriend and me to take pictures when he proposed! Some of my favorite memories include going to the Bremen Weihnachtsmarkt with my flatmates, visiting Köln with other Dickinson students, getting engaged in the Bürgerpark, going to my first pride parade in Bremerhaven, and staying with one of my German friends in Berlin for Berlin pride! I have so many funny and amazing stories ranging from getting stranded in Belgium, to clubbing in La Viva in Bremen. One of the challenges I struggled with was all of my classes being in German. The first semester of classes were especially difficult for me, but the longer I lived in Germany and the more I spoke German with my flatmates, the easier it got. The second semester of classes at Uni Bremen was much more fun since I could understand better. Despite the difficulties I had during my study abroad, I would say this was the best experience of my life. I loved Bremen so much that I am applying for EU citizenship now so I can move back to Bremen in a few years.

Webinar: Putin – The Engima by Professor Janine Ludwig

“Who is Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin, the president of the Russian Federation who is waging a war against Ukraine — and, as he claims, against the “collective West”? Why is he doing all of this?”

Professor Janine Ludwig, academic director of the Durden Dickinson in Bremen Program, will discuss these topics in the free Webinar ”Putin – The Enigma“ on Tuesday, September 26 at 12pm EDT (6pm CEST).

You may find more information and the chance to register for free (until September 24) here: https://our.dickinson.edu/24aewebinarputin

📸 https://www.pexels.com/de-de/foto/fokusfotografie-der-weissen-maske-2375034/

Memorable Experiences: Volunteering and Cultural Engagement in Bremen

by Vasilisa Pallis ’24

During my study abroad year in Bremen I was incredibly grateful to have had the opportunity to not only study in a German University and learn so much, but also volunteer. Before coming to Germany, I feared I wouldn’t get the opportunity to use my Russian as much, since I am a double major in German and Russian. But I was happily surprised when I was able to not only take classes with Russian content but also volunteer with Ukrainian refugees at the “Nachbarschaftshaus Helene Kaisen”, an open space for events, social facilities, and recreational areas in Bremen.

Glance at American Delegation at Special Olympics in Bremen.

There are numerous opportunities within this cultural center for Ukrainian children and teenagers to participate in different activities, such as learning English, and German, or simply having a place to go to after school. There I started a “Sprachcafé” (a language café) for Ukrainian teenagers, to practice their language skills. It was an incredible experience to get to meet such brave young students who have gone through such a horrifying experience and get to simply speak with them and get to know them. I loved having a chance to use my Russian as well as German, it was so cool to be able to speak almost three different languages at the same time. I am so grateful to have had this memorable and fulfilling opportunity.

American Delegation being interviewed in the city center of Bremen.

 

In addition to my help with Ukrainian refugees, I also had the opportunity to help with Special Olympics Bremen. It was amazing to get to help during the Host Town Program when the US delegation came to Bremen before heading off to the Special Olympics in Berlin. I loved meeting the different athletes, making them feel comfortable, showing them around Bremen, and helping with their training before the Olympics. All in all, I am extremely grateful to have experienced my year in Bremen and to have helped in any way I could while in Bremen. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and I am proud to say I have enjoyed and learned so much from it.

Time to say Goodbye: Farewell Dinner 2023

An insight into our (very yummy) farewell dinner in mid-July. It’s hard to believe, but unfortunately, our students’ time in Bremen is already over. We hope that you enjoyed your time here and that you take with you many unforgettable memories. We wish you all the best for your future, whether in your further studies, career or personal goals. If you ever get homesick for Germany in the future, you are always welcome to visit us in Bremen!

OPEN CAMPUS 2023

This year’s OPEN CAMPUS was a blast. Inspired by the motto “Open worlds – share knowledge” around 20.000 guests were not only able to learn more about the Uni itself and its institutes through lectures and guided tours, but also enjoy some great music in a festival-like setting in the evening. We’re already excited for the next year!

Independence Day Dinner 2023

We hope you had a great Independence Day!  Here are some moments we captured at the Independence Day Dinner organised by the Carl Schurz Deutsch-Amerikanischer Club e.V. at the Restaurant “Waldbühne”.

New Scholarship Flyer for the Spring Semester 2024!

Attention Bremen students! Our new scholarship flyer for the spring semester 2024 has arrived 👀

You can find all necessary information about our scholarship program between the University of Bremen and Dickinson College on the flyer. We are looking forward to your application! 🤓

Should you like to have more information, you can come visit us during our office hours on Wednesdays, 11 – 12 (Uni Bremen Sportturm, C5200) or schedule an appointment with us.

Romano De Caprio’s Internship („Praktikum“) in Rhineland-Palatinate

by Romano De Caprio ’24

Gerd Schreiner is a local politician for Rhineland-Palatinate, and he is currently fighting to make big changes. Throughout the month of March, he was gracious enough to let me experience the beauty of German local politics.

Mr. Schreiner is a member of the “Christlich Demokratische Union Deutschlands“ (CDU) in Rhineland-Palatinate, which is a successful Christian-democratic, conservative, and economically liberal party in Germany. He is the head of the ‘Klimaschutzpolitik’ for his faction, which means he has input in every form of climate protection-based policy in Rhineland-Palatinate. When I first arrived in Mainz at the end of March, I had no idea what to expect. All that I wanted to get out of this internship was to be able to see how the inner workings of German politics function. It did not take long for me to see Mr. Schreiner meet with numerous Mainz Citizens daily and work with them to better his beautiful city. On the very first night of my internship, Mr. Schreiner said to me “Come to my event tonight, it will give you a true insight into the way politics work here.”
The event was called a podium discussion, which Mr. Schreiner was the moderator of. I was unaware until the beginning of the event that the two men discussing at the podium would be Nino Haase (non-party) and Christian Viering (Die Grünen), the two men running for Mayor and at the time in a run-off race. Although it was apparent that they were competing against each other, their civility and respect for one another were incredible. Even though I might not be German it was evident to me that both candidates had the goal to make Rhineland-Palatinate better for all. The event itself was delightful and truly set the tone for the rest of my time in Mainz. The next day I was able to sit in on the CDU-Fraktion’s group meeting where they discussed what they would say at the next Parliament meeting, and then I was able to witness them in action hours later as the Bundestag met. My everyday life in Mainz was simply enhancing and unimaginable, every day was so different from the last.

One day Mr. Schreiner took me to the city of Sinzig to meet with businessmen and discuss how to avoid another possible flood. After that meeting, Mr. Schreiner drove me around the town so that I could see the impacts of the last flood and he informed me of all the tragedies that occurred in a certain area. The next day we met with two architects from Berlin and Mr. Schreiner gave them a private tour of Dom St. Johannis, the older delicate Cathedral in Mainz. I was very lucky to see the insides of this beautiful historic Cathedral for myself, and I could not believe how spooky the hidden crypt aspect was.

However, my absolute favorite experience of my internship did not even take place in Mainz. On a Friday in late March, Mr. Schreiner, his team, and I drove to a town called Würzburg in Bavaria. There we learned about the new innovative ways that people are becoming more carbon-friendly and what adaptations ‘Wine Mountains’ have made in the past few years. Both topics were insightful to learn about and everyone was extremely nice. It was tricky to understand the Germans from Bavaria because they have a very unique dialect, but I had an amazing time.

Overall, working for Mr. Schreiner was simply a pleasure, I was genuinely excited to go to his office every day. I did not have the most rigorous amount of daily work as my big project was to write an article on the differences in carbon neutrality in sports stadiums between the US and Germany, that will appear in a book published by Mr. Schreiner. This article took up the majority of my time in Mainz, and along the journey of writing it, Mr. Schreiner was extremely kind in helping me. He taught me a lot about the German grammar errors I was making but more importantly, this project taught me how to take it upon myself to research a topic and gain expertise on it all on my own. I am very grateful Mr. Schreiner took me on to be his “Praktikant” and it has been a memory of a lifetime for me!